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The charismatic John Stamos has done much to promote Fuller House, although the show's own promo spots have done nothing but terrify those who dared to mine the depths of Kimmy Gibbler nostalgia. If anyone can still bring viewers, it's Stamos, who has cheerfully removed his pants (not once but twice), and now he's stepped up for the ultimate sacrifice — a Howard Stern interview.

Of course, I kid. Stern isn't as hard-hitting as he was back in the day. He's actually a big ol' softie now, but Stamos and Stern dug into some hefty subjects. Stamos revealed his deep spiral of alcohol abuse and how he returned to happiness. He speaks of never becoming a father, and that subject was a sad one too. Then things got rowdy (as always) when the Beach Boys came up, and the subject turned to the time Jimmy Page dared to scream at John Stamos:

With Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page joining the Beach Boys during John's early Washington Monument show, Jeff Foskett was in charge of teaching Jimmy what key each Beach Boys song was in. John was brought along to the rehearsals in a hotel room. "We're in this hotel and we go up to the penthouse suite and there's cases everywhere … and I thought it was guitars everywhere. He had like whips and devil sh*t," John remembered. The defining moment came when Jeff was off with a roadie and in his absence, Jimmy turned to John to ask about the keys to a few songs. As a result, John got the brunt of Jimmy's displeasure with the answers. "‘I can't f*cking solo in E flat!' [Jimmy] was yelling at me and I was twenty years old or something."

Martin Barre has recalled the moment that speaking to Jimmy Page could have led to him losing a guitar solo on classic Jethro Tull track Aqualung. He risked bandleader Ian Anderson taking away the opportunity, and filling the space on tape with flute work instead.

The album of the same name was released 45 years ago in March. It was recorded at Island Studios in London, while Led Zeppelin were working on their fourth record next door.

Barre tells Guitar Player: "We'd locked ourselves away and I hadn't seen Jimmy at all. Finally he walked into the control room to say hello, just as I was recording the solo to Aqualung.

"In those days, if you didn't get a guitar solo in one or two takes, it might become a flute solo. It was, 'Go in there and do it or else.' And here was Jimmy, waving like mad - 'Hey, Martin!' - and I'm thinking, 'I can't wave back or I'm going to blow the solo!'" Read more here.

From: Antimusic

Last night in Seattle, at the Experience Music Project Museum, a group of musicians got together to honor Jimmy Page.

But no one expected the former Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin and Firm guitarist to actually perform.

Then, as the night (and the Firm's "Radioactive") was coming to a close, Page quickly took the stage and was handed a lovely Gibson Les Paul burst. Before anyone could react, the band launched into Led Zeppelin's "Rock and Roll."

Sharing the stage with Page were his former Firm band mate, Paul Rodgers (whose voice somehow sounds the same as ever) and Alice in Chains singer William Duvall. Also present were Soundgarden's Kim Thayil and Cheap Trick's Rick Nielsen. The house band featured former Guns N' Roses bassist Duff McKagan and ex–Screaming Trees drummer Barrett Martin.

A lot of other musicians were along for the ride. How many can you pick out?



From: Guitar World


Today (January 3) is John Paul Jones’ 70th birthday. He has been a professional musician for over 50 years, with 12 of those most famously in Led Zeppelin. If all that you listen to is his Zeppelin, you are sorely missing out on a musical maestro. Each song that he has performed on, every song that he has arranged for, every song that he has produced is pure genius. There is no way to narrow down a lifetime of virtuosity into a short, however, I present here my personal selection of tracks, in no particular order, that John Paul Jones has been a part of that shines brightly.

A Foggy Day In Vietnam



Most every young studio musician dreams of that one day when they can record their own music. 18 year old Jones recorded this nearly instrumental number in 1964 for Pye Records. Jones played some excellent honky tonk upright piano on this track. It is very reminiscent of songs later in his career, like Hot Dog and Darlene & his 1977 piano solos during No Quarter.

Scumbag Blues



This song starts out with a killer riff, heavy 4-string bass and layers guitar over that. Then it changes into a signature John Paul Jones walking bass run in the pre-chorus. The second half of the pre-chorus has some funky clavinet work. All that plus Jones contributing some backup vocals and mini improv bass solos when performed live.

Skótoseme



Jones has never been afraid to stray from traditional rock and roll. This has never been held more true than with the album The Sporting Life with avant-garde singer Diamanda Galás. To most ears, her vocals sound unintelligible, however, Skótoseme (Greek for “kill me”) has some tasty bass work on a Manson 8-string bass, wired in stereo and drums by Pete Thomas, Elvis Costello’s drummer, who later played on Jones’ first solo album in 1999, Zooma.

The Lemon Song



The Lemon Song features exemplary bass runs that many budding bass guitarists have often tried to imitate (including yours truly). Recorded virtually live in Mirror Studios in 1969, Jones is definitely pulling from his roots to pull this song off.

Dazed And Confused



The second that you hear the haunting, descending bass line, you can instantly tell that it’s John Paul Jones in Dazed And Confused from Led Zeppelin. In the first few albums, you can tell that Jones and Jimmy Page were experimenting with different studio tricks and the tone of the bass is a bit muted, lacking some natural echo that you hear in most other tracks. It adds to the overall psychedelic loneliness that creeps over you.

When this song was played live and it stretched to over 30 minutes in length, not once could you tell that Jones was straining to keep up with the guitar or drums. He was perfectly locked within the groove.

Stairway To Heaven



Some may look at Stairway To Heaven and think that it’s a Page track. How untrue? Jones was all over the place on this song. In addition to Fender Rhodes keyboard action that fills in against the beautiful Page guitar work and unreal bass guitar runs, there is no other song that better rocks out on a quartet of bass recorders, all played by Jones. You simply cannot get any more badass than that.

Tidal (Guitar Wars version)



Riding high from the underground success of two solo albums and supporting tours, Jones accepted the invitation to appear at Guitar Wars 2003 in Tokyo, Japan. The JPJ Orchestra was in full force with Nuno Bettencourt on guitar, Jones on 10-string Manson bass, Roger King on keyboards, Mike Szuter who came in later on the track on bass guitar & Paul Mastelotto on drums.

Jones was definitely feeling his oats, switching on some effects and taking on a freaking impressive outro bass guitar solo.

The Song Remains The Same (live version)



While Jimmy Page is busy weaving his guitar magic, John Paul Jones, with assistance from the drums, lays down a heavy foundation. Not satisfied with playing root notes to maintain the beat, Jones is all over the fretboard, finding a way to play some solo-sounding rhythm work.

No Quarter (live version)



John Paul Jones was so much more than a bass guitarist and this track exemplifies this. Originally, in 1970, No Quarter had a faster tempo and patched together several different contrasting parts. When it was time to record No Quarter in the studio in early 1972, it was slowed down and the whole song was dropped a semi-tone in pitch to add to the mysteriousness of the song.

This song was premiered on the second leg of the 1973 Summer US tour up until Led Zeppelin’s last date in 1980. It showcased John Paul Jones’ abilities on the keyboards, with lengthy piano solos added in the middle of the song.

Ice Fishing At Night



Some electronica starts this song off and then a simple piano passage begins. If you thought that John Paul Jones was only an instrumentalist, you were wrong. Jones adds in a very tender set of lyrics that has the aural mysticism of a classic oil painting. The piano continues into a solo passage that has a second piano part overdubbed. This is truly a non-traditional John Paul Jones-sounding masterpiece.
The soundtrack for CBS Films’ holiday comedy Love The Coopers won’t street until November 13, the same day the movie hits theaters, but this morning’s tease pretty much made my day: there’s a new original song (a Christmas one) on the album from Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, who in 2007 teamed for the Grammy-winning Album of the Year Raising Sand but haven’t recorded anything together since.

It’s a coup for CBS Films, which is good at the care and feeding of the music in its films — the studio guided the cool folk soundtrack (OK, they had help from uber-producer T Bone Burnett) for the Coen Brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis that featured music from Bob Dylan, Marcus Mumford and the Punch Brothers and of course the film’s stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, Adam Driver and Justin Timberlake. The Coopers soundtrack, from Republic Records, also features two Dylan songs, as well as Nina Simone, Sting and Fleet Foxes among others.

Love The Coopers centers on four generations of a family who come together for their annual Christmas Eve celebration, and a series of unexpected visitors and unlikely events turn the night upside down. Diane Keaton, John Goodman, Ed Helms, Olivia Wilde, Amanda Seyfried, Anthony Mackie and Marisa Tomie lead the ensemble cast helmed by Jessie Nelson.

Check out Plant and Krauss’ video released today for “The Light Of Christmas Day.”



From: Deadline Hollywood
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