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Sonic Boom: The Impact Of Led Zeppelin Vol. One

th sonic boom

"Page was really, really fast on the guitar. What a player - and loud! Plant's vocals were almost out of control and had a desparate quality to them that i hadn't heard in any other singer, quite like that. Bonham and Jones looked and sounded like they knew what they were doing. Like I said before, we didn't know who Jones, Bonham and Plant were. My friends were stunned at how Zeppelin played too. We were all impressed at how good they were. And they were only an opening act." -Bob Stall on Led Zeppelin's Dec. 29. 1968 Portland, Oregon Performance.

Sonic Boom: The Impact Of Led Zeppelin, Volume 1 Break & Enter by Frank Reddon is the first part in a series on Led Zeppelin as told by people that were there, seeing them live and concert and from the outside perspective of those that were alive and aware of the changing times of rock music.

From Don Fitzpatrick, who promoted Led Zeppelin at the JFK Pavilion, Gonzaga University at Spokane, Washington, who got swung at by Jimmy Page for introuducing the band incorrectly to the late, great DJ/VJ J.J. Jackson who attended Zeppelin's January 1969 Boston Tea Party shows to Andy Simpson, a San Francisco blues guitarist who discusses the 1960s music scene in San Francisco, I really got a total and complete sense of Led Zeppelin in their infancy.

This 736-page behemoth boasts 53 separate interviewees as well as a section of learning resources, which contains suggested books, articles, websites, officially released CDs and DVDs.

Volume 2: You Shook U.S. and Volume 3: The Tape Kept A-Rollin' are future volumes in this series set to be released later in 2009 and I personally cannot wait to read them as quickly and with such enthusiasm as I did this 1st edition.

You can order Sonic Boom: The Impact Of Led Zeppelin, Volume 1 Break & Enter online and via mail from the Enzepplopedia Publishing, Inc. website.

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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

July xx, 1969 - The band play many festivals now on their third American tour
July xx, 1970 - Additional recording for Led Zeppelin III at London’s Island Studios
July 16, 1970 - Photographer Chris Welch films Led Zeppelin on his 8mm camera, some clips later used in the Whole Lotta Love promo video
July xx, 1971 - Untitled gets re-mixed in London
July 05, 1971 - A riot erupts mid-concert, forcing Led Zeppelin to stop after about 40 minutes
July xx, 1972 - After repeated bad press, Led Zeppelin hire their first publicity firm
July 20, 1973 - A last minute decision is made to film the remaining part of the tour
July xx, 1973 - Led Zeppelin is filmed over the three nights for their film that will emerge as The Song Remains The Same
July xx, 1974 - After viewing their 1973 filmed performance, it is apparent critical errors were made
July xx, 1974 - Mixing for Physical Graffiti at Olympic Studios
July 05, 1975 - The band meet in Montreux to discuss adding South America and Japan to the end of their North American tour
July xx, 1976 - Bonham and Page fly to Montreux, Switzerland to check out some new sound and drum effects
July 17, 1977 - The last ever performance of Moby Dick played at the Seattle Kingdome
July 24, 1977 - The band plays its last US date at the Oakland Coliseum
July xx, 1978 - Led Zeppelin are invited to perform at Maggie Bell’s Festival Hall show
July xx, 1979 - Led Zeppelin film their rehearsal at Bray Studios
July 04, 1979 - Led Zeppelin confirm a second date at Knebworth in August 1979
July 05, 1980 - Simon Kirke joins in on drums for an encore in Munich
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