Main        |      Studio and Live Gear|News|Contact
    Facebook  Twitter  Instagram 

Led Zeppelin Kneads Crowd to Silly Putty, Jul. 16, 1973

The Buffalo Evening News
By Dale Anderson

Led Zeppelin doesn't give concerts; they perform physical transformation. They kneaded the full-house crowd in Memorial Auditorium into silly putty Sunday night with 2 hours and 50 minutes of massive sensory massage.

The sheer enormity of the sound did it (though the full moon may have helped), an enormity that resonates into your paleolithic pith, the cry of the dinosaur summoning out that primitive quickening in the face of monstrosity.

Whatever isn't touched by the earthquake rumble of John Paul Jones' bass, John Bonham's gunshot cracks on the drums or Robert Plant's echoey heart-of darkness voice is left quivering by the swooping electronic slices of guitarist Jimmy Page, especially his solo on the theremin.

Never mind that their newest album carries a variety of dynamics, the quiet sections hardly diminish the over-all sonic assault.

Their relatively simple brooding themes are blown larger than life, like sky scraping office buildings, and they lay on thick embellishments and b r o a d dramatic resolutions that mean more en mass than as individual items.

The four of them approached it all with unexpected good humor. Jones and Bonham laid back blithely amongst the folding backdrop of mirrors the run the length of the stage.

Page in black with a rhinestone-studded rose on his open jacket, prancing like a cocky midlands soccer player in a pub, Plant in tight jeans and a shirt jacket with rhinestones and, puffed sleeves strutting and grinding and shaking back his curly blond mane.

Plant avoided some of the astringent high notes he puts on records, singing for instance a low harmony line for "Over the Hills and Far Away." And for all his gyrations, he was hardly as compelling as Mick Jagger or Rod Stewart.

Page laughed off his first-number hassles with a slipping guitar strap as a stagehand buttoned it back together. Kept playing too. Plant was almost as cordial as a music hall host and chastised the firecracker tossers, of whom there were a lot more than usual.

The band took no breaks, despite the heat. Applause followed a few Page guitar solos but the youngish crowd didn't really erupt until the start of "Stairway to Heaven" and again when the spinning mirrored ball went on as it closed.

The heavy drumbeat into "Moby Dick" brought a rush on the stage and most of the hall stayed on its feet for that last hour, including along Bonham drum solo with special synthesizer effects.

An eight-minute ovation brought them back for an encore after their boogieing final number. "Thank you, Buffalo," Plant said when they finished. "Take care until we see you again."

Article

ADVERTISEMENTS

Candy Store Rock Gifts

Novel gifts for the consummate Led Zeppelin fan, as well as the best selection of quality gifts and accessories for musicians.

This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

August xx, 1968 - Page, Plant, Jones and Bonham hold their first rehearsals in Gerrard Street, London
August xx, 1968 - Page, Grant and Chris Dreja go see Robert Plant perform at a Birmingham Teachers College. Page invites Plant to his Pangbourne house and offers him the vocalist position
August xx, 1969 - Peter Grant starts enforcing the 90/10 split in favor of the band
August 31, 1969 - The third US tour ends at the Texas International Festival in Dallas
August xx, 1970 - Zeppelin earn no less than $25,000 per show
August 17, 1970 - Page completes mixing of the Led Zeppelin III in Memphis
August 19, 1971 - The seventh North American tour opens in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
August xx, 1972 - Jimmy Page purchases Plumpton Manor in Sussex
August xx, 1973 - Jimmy starts arranging ideas for the next album
August xx, 1974 - Film maker Peter Clifton has the band re-enact scenes at Shepperton Studios
August 31, 1974 - John Paul Jones appears with David Gilmour and Steve Broughton as Roy Harper’s backing band for the night
August 04, 1975 - Robert Plant and his family are seriously injured as their car veers off the road on the island of Rhodes
August 08, 1975 - Rehearsal for Zeppelin’s Eleventh North American tour postponed after Robert is involved in a serious car accident
August xx, 1976 - Arrangements are made to show the upcoming Zep film in theaters
August xx, 1976 - Jimmy Page finishes mixing the soundtrack for the movie The Song Remains The Same
August 14, 1977 - Jimmy jams with Ron Wood at a charity golf tournament for underprivileged children
August xx, 1978 - Robert plays with Dr. Feelgood and Phil Carson in Ibiza, Spain while on holiday
August 11, 1979 - Led Zeppelin perform a second show at Knebworth due to overwhelming ticket demands
August xx, 1980 - Jimmy moves into his new Windsor home, which was purchased from Michael Caine
August 14, 2009 - It Might Get Loud opened in select theatres in NY, WA & CA.
© 1996 - 2017 Led Zeppelin: Achilles Last Stand - All Rights Reserved
Advertise | Disclaimer | Site Map