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A life beyond Led, Robert Plant - Jul. 09, 2002

By Adam Howorth

It's not easy being a living rock legend, the former Led Zeppelin wild man Robert Plant tells our critic

It's not been a good year for rock legends. Two Ramones, George Harrison, and now The Who's John Entwistle are all new additions to that great rock 'n' roll band in the sky. And Robert Plant, the voice and golden locks of Led Zeppelin, wonders if he's next.

"Maybe it's written in the stars that I'm going to expire before the autumn," he says. "Because there's a dramatic swing towards people coming along to have a look at me. But that can be quite a let-down, you know? When you're really into people a lot, sometimes you just don't want to see them later on."

What the public want and what Robert Plant wants is not necessarily the same thing. At a recent London gig the evening was punctuated by shouts from the audience for old Led Zeppelin material. After all, the Seventies rock goliaths did sell 200 million records, as well as being the most celebrated exponents of debauchery on tour since the Vikings. Plant stuck admirably to his game plan and material from his latest solo album, Dreamland, which entered the charts at number 20 last week.

Essentially a collection of cover versions, Plant feels justified in his decision to make it. "They were songs I've always loved and I didn't see them as covers because I was there when they were being written," he explains. "It was just this period in American music that I'd never really got near to vocally in my adventures up to now. My ability and vocal chords are all in good shape but I haven't really felt substantially relevant as a lyricist for a long time, so I thought, I'm dry as a bone but these songs are still vibrant."

Fortunately Plant's new record company Mercury (he recently left Atlantic after 34 years) was equally enthusiastic. "Expectations of shipping out truckloads of Robert Plant albums are a bit far-fetched," he says. "I don't know if Johnny Cash has trouble shifting units but I know that Peggy Lee lost her contract at Capitol after being there for 40 years, and she still sang good, but there was nobody to sing to any more. So I'm neither one of the Gallaghers nor am I quite Peggy Lee."

Plant began singing when he was 14, filling in for a school friend. "The singer got ill one night and we played an old ice-skating rink in Swanlicote," he remembers. "I could actually sing and ad-lib bits I'd heard on Dion and the Belmonts tracks in the middle of the song."

Now 53, he is still instantly recognisable as the bare-chested, preening frontman with the biggest and baddest rock band of them all. Though his face looks well lived in, the goldilocks are still in place, as is the voice that inspired generations of big-haired, tight-trousered, heavy metal screamers.

He's due to tour in the States later in the summer then here in October. After that he doesn't rule out another instalment of Page and Plant, his collaboration with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page. A reunion with the band's bass player, John Paul Jones, remains unlikely though. "My relationship with 'Jonesy' is hampered by one misinterpreted word, and that was at the first press conference that Page and I did to go with the 'Unledded' stuff. The first question to me was, 'Where's John Paul Jones?' I said, 'He's parking the car' - and that was it. No cards, no hellos. I apologised and went to one meeting and got on one knee as he was walking out, to tie my shoelace as well, and said, 'John, surely now we're way too old for this?' But he just sidestepped me and walked out. "But I love him and want you to know, John, that if you have me back we can go back to the one card a year."

Unsurprisingly, his recollection of the Zep days are a little hazy. "I don't remember a lot of it," he admits. "And I don't know whether it was a chemical excess that obliterated part of the memory. But then again excess can be quite humdrum when there's no end to it. You read about Lenny Bruce - people who have lived in a 'condition', from Fatty Arbuckle to Shelley, Yeats, all these guys who were out there - in the end there's nothing to remember; it's all burnt out."
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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

June xx, 1969 - More recording for Led Zeppelin II at Morgan Studios
June 29, 1969 - Led Zeppelin play the prestigious Royal Albert Hall
June 28, 1970 - Zeppelin reach mass acceptance in Britain by playing Bath
June xx, 1971 - A news report claims Led Zep to play at an aid relief concert for Pakistan
June xx, 1972 - More recording sessions for Houses Of The Holy
June 21, 1972 - Eighth American tour begins in Denver, CO, almost four years since Zeppelin’s American debut
June 03, 1973 - Zeppelin play the Fabulous Forum in LA, a favorite venue to the band
June xx, 1973 - The band takes a mid-tour holiday in Hawaii
June xx, 1974 - Promoter Fred Bannister announces that Led Zeppelin will play Knebworth, the band declines
June xx, 1975 - John Bonham loses his license for six months over a drunk driving charge
June xx, 1976 - Filmmaker Kenneth Anger tells media that Jimmy Page is partly responsible for the failure of his film over the delayed soundtrack he provided
June 07, 1977 - The first of six nights at Madison Square Gardens
June xx, 1978 - Robert feels new life within Led Zeppelin again
June 26, 1979 - The entire Led Zeppelin line up appear at a Dave Edmunds show and party afterwards
June 17, 1980 - Led Zeppelin open their European (and last) tour at Westfallenhalle in Dortmund
June 27, 1980 - Zeppelin abandon their Nuremburg show after three numbers when Bonham collapses from exhaustion
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