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Miami, Florida

The considerable bulk of Peter Grant relaxed in a Miami Beach hotel after a day of fishing in the blue waters of Biscayne Bay.

The discerning South London-born manager of Led Zeppelin, the group which is the current sensation in the world of hard rock, had just heard with acute satisfaction that their last LP is topping the American album chart.

"Only our fifth album, and our fifth 'number one' here and in Britain," he mused. Under Grant's astute guidance which has made them all into millionaires, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Robert Plant and John Bonham are being talked about as four young men who are doing what the American pop world thought impossible out-Beatling the Beatles.

The comparisons with the Liverpool group don't stop there for 38-year-old Grant, married with a wife and two children, is inevitably being compared with the late Brian Epstein as a financial genius who knows how to exploit talent to its full.

The unsentimental music moguls of America are contemplating with envy the cash that is flowing to Led Zeppelin.

They arrived only last week for their eighth tour of America and immediately pulled in a crowd of 54,000 in Atlanta.

Then, they moved south to Tampa, Florida where 58,000 fans paid a record £127,000 to hear them. The 35 concerts they will churn out on the tour are expected to bring them £2 million and Grant said they do the concerts to plug their albums.

The group's current LP, Houses of the Holy, has sold 1,200,000 copies in five weeks and is eventually expected to bring in £8 million.

And altogether this year the quartet of electronic musicians and their manager are expected to earn £12 million - "before expenses," said Grant.

"And they are pretty considerable we have a 10-man team of lighting and sound men to go ahead of us, and considering too, that it costs us nearly £15,000 to put on each concert."

Grant said that he joined Zeppelin five years ago (1968) when the Yardbirds, another group he used to manage, split up.

"We explored all the styles and techniques but tried not to lose the heavy core of raw feeling that was the sound in those days," said Grant.

Finally they developed a sophisticated free-floating blues style which has struck a chord of recognition in youth all over the world.
Ever wonder how the likes of Steven Tyler could produce an offspring as flawless as Liv? The answer is Bebe Buell. The inspiration for the Penny Lane character in Cameron Crowe's Almost Famous, Beverle "Bebe" Lorence Buell left behind her life as a Virginia military brat in the early Seventies and descended on New York City. Snapped up by top modeling agent Eileen Ford, the leggy 19-year-old and her incredible mane cut a wide swath down Seventh Avenue. Her future as a supermodel was assured, but Buell sought a different kind of satisfaction. Seduced by the siren song of rock 'n' roll, she ferreted out the New York music scene and never looked back.

Hanging out with the likes of Elvis Costello, Iggy Pop and Andy Warhol, Buell's sexy, sloe-eyed cool helped her to bed some of the rock world's greatest talents. Those acid-infused connections and her arresting looks eventually led her to Playboy and a November 1974 Centerfold. Buell's tumultuous five-year relationship with live-in love Todd Rundgren is legendary -- as is her tryst and subsequent love child, Liv, with pouty Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler.

These days, the formidably 48-year-old Buell has come full circle, forming a band and watching her daughter become a star in her own right. In Rebel Heart, her soon-to-be-published rock diary, Buell offers up a pleasure chest of anecdotes about her days among rock royalty. We sat down with this melodic muse to talk about her book, her boyfriends and her badass reputation.

Playboy.com: How did you become a Playmate?

Bebe Buell: In 1973, Lynn Goldstein came over to the flat where Todd and I lived in New York and took some pictures of me. She was making a name for herself at the time as a young rock photographer and we just set up something very informal -- no big deal. We started drinking chianti, one thing led to another, and before I knew it we were shooting nudes. Lynn and I were so blown away by the pictures when she got them back that we shot a second set. It was her idea to send them in to a men's magazine. About a week after she sent some shots to Playboy, I got a call from [Playboy editor] Hollis Wayne.

PB: We've seen your pictorial -- incredibly sexy. Did you ever have a fling with Hef?

BB: Never even kissed him. Hef never showed any interest in me sexually. I think he's a sexy man. He was very, very hot in the Seventies. I just wasn't his type. Platinum blonde, thin eyebrows, big boobies -- those were the kinds of women he dated. People just assumed that all the Playmates slept with him. Back then, the magazine used to have stars on the cover that were supposed to indicate how many times you'd slept with Hef. [Editor's note: In fact, the stars indicated the domestic or international advertising region for that edition of the magazine.]

PB: Any stars on your cover?

BB: I don't remember. If there were, they weren't legitimate. I embraced the whole Playboy philosophy, but I never bought into the Playboy world. I never did Playmate promotions, I never wore those little [Bunny costumes]. Hef always looked at me as the nonconformist Playmate.

PB: You mentioned in the book that after your Playboy pictorial you developed an unsavory reputation. Any truth to the rumor?

BB: Unfortunately, doing Playboy carried a stigma [in 1974]. Now if you do Playboy you can become Pamela Lee. But because I was a fashion model when I did my pictorial, it ruined my reputation. And, you know, concepts like "ruined my reputation" should not even exist! I still don't regret doing the pictorial. I'm glad I did it! I can show my grandkids. Wasn't your grandma hot? I have absolutely no regrets about my affiliations with the Playboy family. I wanted to be the one you unfolded from the middle of the magazine. But my earning capacity completely plummeted after that.

PB: Your doing the pictorial must have been a novelty with your crowd. There really weren't any Playmates hanging out with you guys.

BB: I think I was the first successful model/girlfriend of a rock star to do Playboy. Todd dated Marlene Morrow [Miss April 1974], but she wasn't a famous model or anything. She hadn't merited any publicity in that arena. Playboy was probably the biggest thing she ever did. Todd was really the first rock star to do the Playmate thing. He's been a pioneer of many things in music and video -- why not be the first one to start dating Playmates? I mean, he had two Playmates in one year. I can't say the same for Tommy Lee. And Todd found time to fit Patti Smith in there, too!

PB: You describe your relationships with guys like Steven Tyler, Mick Jagger, Bowie and Jimmy Page as "sweet, normal, romantic and nice." Sounds positively missionary -- not at all what anyone would expect from these guys.

BB: I like missionary. I think those guys are probably different sexually with each person they're with. Sexuality is a meeting of the minds, not just a meeting of the bodies. And I think that however you perceive yourself is how you're going to be treated.

PB: So you think they were responding to you -- to what you liked.

BB: And to what was inside of them when they were with me. I had a very animal attraction to my daughter's father. But I didn't have an animal attraction to Todd. There's a picture of Steven and me in my book, and the caption is "Born to breed," because I think that was really what was meant to happen between us.

PB: There's a passage in the book about Jimmy Page's weird penchant for "spewing saliva" into your mouth when you were having sex. Was that a control thing?

BB: I think that was his way of putting some of himself in me. But, really, it was very romantic. Jimmy was very romantic. [Most of the time] these guys were with women who would do anything. I think it was refreshing for them to entertain that romantic, little-girl fantasy I've always had. It was like a vacation, a day off. They didn't have to get out the whips.

PB: The Penny Lane character in Almost Famous is adamant about her status as a "band aide" rather than a groupie. Define the difference.

BB: Groupies are girls who hang around and just want to have sex with rock stars. It's really kind of a gross tag. Band aides and people like that are there because they love the music. I think women have a right to an affinity and a love for music just as much as men do. I mean, no one calls Keith Richards a groupie just because he goes to see Chuck Berry -- because he hangs on Chuck Berry's vibe every second of being there. It's really no different. I was really, really very much in tune with the music. Courtney Love and Chrissie Hynde have dated a lot more pop stars than I have, but they've got on their penises -- their guitars -- and nobody says anything about them. If it was a guy, nobody would notice [his presence]. There were plenty of guys hanging around my boyfriend. There were just as many guys trying to get backstage as girls.

PB: What's the most unlikely place you ever had sex?

BB: An airplane. That was back in the days when you could smoke on a plane and when two people could go into a stall. I went in with Todd. And also one time with Stiv [Bator, of the Dead Boys]. I've been pretty traditional in the places I chose to have sex -- cars, beds, couches. The most unusual place for me was the bathroom. And, of course, because I'm five foot ten everybody had to stand....

PB: Did you limit your boyfriends to musicians?

BB: Not really. There was [British fashion photographer] Clive Arrowsmith. I dated him in 1976. Isn't that weird that I dated a guy named Arrowsmith, then a year later I hook up with Steven Tyler? Talk about synchronicity.

PB: Tell us about having sex up against a car with Jack Nicholson.

BB: I've known Jack since 1980. [Designer] Diane Von Furstenberg introduced us. The first time I hung out with him was with Jerry Hall and Mick Jagger. He's a great guy. We dated for about a year. I was dating him at the time the car thing happened. It was very cool. My first sex-against-the-car lesson with Jack.

PB: Any reaction to the book from any of the guys you mention in there?

BB: Well they haven't read it yet, but I don't give a flying fuck what they think. This is not 1987 when Pamela Des Barres wrote I'm With the Band. I'm hoping everybody will be happy with the way they're depicted in the book. If they're not, go write your own book. This is my life. I wrote this book to liberate myself and hopefully help other women to know that life isn't over when you reach 40, life isn't over if you don't have the perfect relationship, life isn't over if everything doesn't work out like the textbook says it's supposed to. Go deeper. Reach deeper. Go after it!

PB: Do you think today's Playmates are treated more like superstars than they were when you did your pictorial?

BB: Absolutely. They can do anything they want. You can do Playboy and be a movie star, star in a TV show, do anything you want. It holds no restrictions anymore. I'm actually surprised that more rock 'n' roll people don't do Playboy. I mean, you don't see Stevie Nicks in there, you don't see Debbie Harry, because they're afraid it's going to ruin their careers. But look at what it did for Kim Basinger's career. I love Belinda Carlisle's pictorial. To me sex, romanticism, rock 'n' roll...it all goes together. Why do you think these guys [musicians] all want to go up to the Mansion? I'm just waiting for somebody like Sheryl Crow or Stevie Nicks to get up there and strip. And if I have to do it again, if I have to pick up the sword again, I'll do it.

Taken from Playboy.com
By Adam Howorth

It's not easy being a living rock legend, the former Led Zeppelin wild man Robert Plant tells our critic

It's not been a good year for rock legends. Two Ramones, George Harrison, and now The Who's John Entwistle are all new additions to that great rock 'n' roll band in the sky. And Robert Plant, the voice and golden locks of Led Zeppelin, wonders if he's next.

"Maybe it's written in the stars that I'm going to expire before the autumn," he says. "Because there's a dramatic swing towards people coming along to have a look at me. But that can be quite a let-down, you know? When you're really into people a lot, sometimes you just don't want to see them later on."

What the public want and what Robert Plant wants is not necessarily the same thing. At a recent London gig the evening was punctuated by shouts from the audience for old Led Zeppelin material. After all, the Seventies rock goliaths did sell 200 million records, as well as being the most celebrated exponents of debauchery on tour since the Vikings. Plant stuck admirably to his game plan and material from his latest solo album, Dreamland, which entered the charts at number 20 last week.

Essentially a collection of cover versions, Plant feels justified in his decision to make it. "They were songs I've always loved and I didn't see them as covers because I was there when they were being written," he explains. "It was just this period in American music that I'd never really got near to vocally in my adventures up to now. My ability and vocal chords are all in good shape but I haven't really felt substantially relevant as a lyricist for a long time, so I thought, I'm dry as a bone but these songs are still vibrant."

Fortunately Plant's new record company Mercury (he recently left Atlantic after 34 years) was equally enthusiastic. "Expectations of shipping out truckloads of Robert Plant albums are a bit far-fetched," he says. "I don't know if Johnny Cash has trouble shifting units but I know that Peggy Lee lost her contract at Capitol after being there for 40 years, and she still sang good, but there was nobody to sing to any more. So I'm neither one of the Gallaghers nor am I quite Peggy Lee."

Plant began singing when he was 14, filling in for a school friend. "The singer got ill one night and we played an old ice-skating rink in Swanlicote," he remembers. "I could actually sing and ad-lib bits I'd heard on Dion and the Belmonts tracks in the middle of the song."

Now 53, he is still instantly recognisable as the bare-chested, preening frontman with the biggest and baddest rock band of them all. Though his face looks well lived in, the goldilocks are still in place, as is the voice that inspired generations of big-haired, tight-trousered, heavy metal screamers.

He's due to tour in the States later in the summer then here in October. After that he doesn't rule out another instalment of Page and Plant, his collaboration with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page. A reunion with the band's bass player, John Paul Jones, remains unlikely though. "My relationship with 'Jonesy' is hampered by one misinterpreted word, and that was at the first press conference that Page and I did to go with the 'Unledded' stuff. The first question to me was, 'Where's John Paul Jones?' I said, 'He's parking the car' - and that was it. No cards, no hellos. I apologised and went to one meeting and got on one knee as he was walking out, to tie my shoelace as well, and said, 'John, surely now we're way too old for this?' But he just sidestepped me and walked out. "But I love him and want you to know, John, that if you have me back we can go back to the one card a year."

Unsurprisingly, his recollection of the Zep days are a little hazy. "I don't remember a lot of it," he admits. "And I don't know whether it was a chemical excess that obliterated part of the memory. But then again excess can be quite humdrum when there's no end to it. You read about Lenny Bruce - people who have lived in a 'condition', from Fatty Arbuckle to Shelley, Yeats, all these guys who were out there - in the end there's nothing to remember; it's all burnt out."
By DAN AQUILANTE

As the voice of Led Zeppelin, Robert Plant redefined the scope of rock music.

On "Dreamland," his new solo record out Tuesday, he dusts off old rock songs for a contemporary audience.In a conversation with The Post from his home on the rolling hills on the Welsh border, the 54-year-old singer seemed a total gentleman - hardly what you'd expect from a guy who sowed acres of wild oats in his chaotic younger days in Led Zep.

When asked how he's changed over time, he paused thoughtfully - as if he'd never considered he was a day older than when he first met Jimmy Page, John Bonham and John Paul Jones.

"I've gotten a bit more patient, I suppose," he said.

"I lost a bit of my ego, but those carnivorous days of swallowing cities whole seem to have been replaced with a feeling that I'm doing something that is so wholeheartedly beautiful that I've found nirvana."

For someone who's found bliss, Plant has quite a bit on his plate. He's the subject of a VH1 "Storytellers" documentary airing Sunday at 11 p.m. He appears Thursday on Letterman and has a July 24 solo gig at the Hammerstein Ballroom.

Then he and his new band, Strange Sensation, will open for The Who when the group performs here later this month.

Post: Naming your record "Dreamland" begs the question - do you remember your dreams?

Plant: In my dreams, I go to wonderful places. Often I go to this beautiful city in the desert. Once I was in India and visited a town that I think might be the place I dream about. My dreams are peaceful places - I don't wake up sweating.

Post: Why did you decide to cover old rock songs on "Dreamland"?

Plant: I don't consider these songs old or rock. These are heirlooms. They come from another time - the end of the two-minute pop pastiche. Men like Dion and the Belmonts and Bobby Vee were passing into history, and this whole department of thought-provoking American folk poetry came forth. This was the music that really stirred me when I was a kid.

Post: And now?

Plant: It continues to do so, and I wanted to go back there. I've always taken strength from these songs - both from the beauty of the melodies and the intentions of what the writers were trying to convey.

Post: You called them heirlooms.

Plant: I don't think of them like they're museum pieces, like say a Chuck Berry song. I believe the lyrical content, the poetic endeavor, is as meaningful today as it was when these songs were written.

Post: Tell me about "Morning Dew."

Plant: That was a song that was around when I was a kid. With few words, it expresses the demise of the human race. I can't call it charming, but it is a beautiful, beautiful song.

Post: This song is treated more gently than some of the others on your disc.

Plant: You're right. I hit "Hey Joe" with a hammer, but not "Morning Dew."

Post: Some artists from big-name bands make cover albums as solo projects to distance themselves from their outfit.

Plant: You might think this is a cheap cop-out, but I put a lot of thought into the music. For me, this is a re-initiation and a return to the beauty of the music and the time it was written.

Post: Why do it now?

Plant: I've always been so busy with Zeppelin and with Jimmy, but I thought, "I'm always listening to this stuff. Why not do it myself?" It was a cathartic exercise of getting the music and the feelings out. I wanted to get it off my chest because I've loved it for so long.

Post: Didn't you do that in Led Zeppelin?

Plant: Yeah, we managed it in songs like "You Shook Me," "Whole Lotta Love" "In My Time of Dying," "Nobody's Fault But Mine" - all those songs are leaning back. We did a whole lot of leaning back in those days, my friend.

Post: So what do you say to the skeptics who charge you with taking the easy way out?

Plant: It isn't easy to maintain a career of some distinction and do a Hendrix tune. I gotta live with what I do, and right now, my soul is intact. So is Jimmy's. We do what we want, and we may work together again, but when we do, it has to be real.

Post: Is it real now?

Plant: I'm doing OK. I'm having a good time. I have a good record and a fantastic band, and my voice is in good shape and my tennis is good and I can still see a good-looking girl from 100 yards.

Post: Being on the road, you probably see lots of good-looking girls even closer.

Plant: I can recognize a good overhand top-spin serve, but that doesn't mean I can do it. And the same goes for the girls.
Message From: Diane [This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]
Subject: Band of Joy Interview

As promised, here is an interview I did with two of the members of The Band of Joy. This was in 1992.

Before Led Zeppelin, Robert Plant was in many bands around the Midlands. These included Hobbstweedle, The New Memphis Bluesbreakers, The Black Snake Moan, The Banned, The Crawling Kingsnakes, The Tennessee Teens and Listen. One of the earliest of these groups was The Band of Joy. This group went through several incarnations, with and without Robert, but it seemed to play an important part in Plant's formative years as a singer. In 1967 The Band of Joy line up was Robert Plant on vocals, John Bonham on drums, Kevin Gammond on guitar, Paul Lockey on bass, and Chris Brown on keyboards. Today, Kevin Gammond is a music professor at a Midlands college and Paul Lockey is a primary school teacher. They both continue playing music in their spare time, and both remain very close friends with Plant. This interview took place over a period of several hours, and was more of a conversation than an interview, so a lot of editing was needed, and the end result is a series of excerpts that are not necessarily in chronological order! It was an enjoyable trip down memory lane for them, and I think they did quite a good job remembering things from 24 years ago!

D-(LOOKING AT BAND OF JOY PHOTO AND SPEAKING TO PAUL) THAT'S YOU?

P-YES, I'M 19, THEY'RE ALL 19 ... (LOOKING AT JACKET HE WAS WEARING IN THE PHOTO) JOHN HAD THIS JACKET THAT HE USED TO WEAR WHEN HE WAS PLAYING, AND HE LOOKED ABSOLUTELY TREMENDOUS, AND I ALWAYS LIKED THIS JACKET. APPARENTLY HE'D WON IT IN A CARD GAME, A SUIT ACTUALLY WITH TROUSERS TO MATCH, WOULD HAVE COST A FORTUNE, SO ANYWAY JOHN SAYS TO THIS GUY I'LL PLAY YOU FOR YOUR COAT, ALWAYS LIKE THAT, ALWAYS THE GAMBLER, SO HE WON THE COAT. AND THEN SIX MONTHS LATER I GOT THE COAT. BECAUSE I LIKED IT SO MUCH THAT WE CUT A DEAL, I DON'T KNOW, SOMETHING LIKE 2 POUNDS OR 2 POUNDS FIFTY AND SOME CIGARETTES, SOMETHING LIKE THAT. AND I'VE STILL GOT IT IN THE WARDROBE NOW!

D-WHO IS THIS?

K-CHRIS BROWN THE KEYBOARD PLAYER IN THE BAND. HE PLAYED THE (MARQUEES?).

P-WAS IT, OR DID HE HAVE A HAMMOND ORGAN IN THE END? I THINK HE HAD A HAMMOND

K-DID HE END UP WITH A HAMMOND?

P-I THINK SO, YEAH. BACKING VOCALS ALSO.

D-KEVIN IS REALLY A PRETTY GOOD GUITAR PLAYER, I SAW A VIDEO OF YOU LAST NIGHT AT THAT LITTLE BENEFIT AT THAT DANCE CLUB.

K-AH, FRANK FREEMAN?

D-YEAH, FRANK FREEMAN

K-AHH, OH MY GOD!

D-YEAH, IT REALLY WAS GOOD.

K-FRANK FREEMAN 1S A LITTLE PIECE OF HISTORY IN THIS TOWN (KIDDERMINSTER). EVERYBODY STARTED OFF COMING THROUGH THE FRANK FREEMAN SORT OF SCENE.

P-YEAH YEAH.

K-IT WAS VERY AMAZNG REALLY BECAUSE GROUPS LIKE CAPTAIN BEEFHART AND ALL MY SORT OF HEROES WERE MUCH MORE SORT OF ETHICAL AND MUCH MORE, BUT I CAN SORT OF LOOK BACK NOW AT ZEPPELIN AND THINK, OH MY GOD, AND CAN REALLY APPRECIATE. AT THE TIME I WAS NOT AT ALL, I WAS MUCH MORE SORT OF VELVET UNDERGROUND, LOU REED, CAPTAIN BEEFHART, ALL THAT SORT OF AN AREA, AND PAUL I THINK. WHERE WERE YOU AT? YOU WERE MUCH MORE SORT OF...

P-WELL A BIT OF EVERYTHING REALLY, A BIT OF THE BLUES, A BIT OF THE OLD SOUL STUFF, IN THOSE DAYS EVERYBODY WAS INTO THE SOUL STUFF. I SORT OF DRASTICALLY CAME FROM NOWHERE REALLY, HA HA, TO PLAY THE BASS...I'M A GUITAR PLAYER, BUT DURING THAT TIME WITH BAND OF JOY I LEARNED TO PLAY THE BASS AND TO PLAY LOUD. YOU HAD TO BECAUSE JOHNNY BONHAM WAS SO LOUD, I STOOD NEXT TO HIM EVERY NIGHT GOING 'AHH!'. MINDBLOWING, YOU KNOW.

K-WHEN YOU LISTEN TO ZEP STUFF NOW, EVEN THE FIRST ALBUM, IT'S VERY GOOD.

D-YEAH, THE FIRST TWO ALBUMS ARE MY FAVORITES.

K-YEAH, BUT THEY WERE JUST...

P-WELL IT WAS JUST WHAT THE BAND OF JOY WAS PLAYING.

K-YEAH, LIVE, YEAH.

P-ONLY THEY DID IT SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT, YEAH, SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT.

D-WELL THOSE FIRST TWO ALBUMS ARE MY FAVOURITE, BUT A LOT OF THOSE SONGS WERE SOME THAT THEY HAD NICKED.

K-OH YEAH, YEAH, WILLIE DIXON WAS, RIGHT UP UNTIL A FEW YEARS BACK THERE WAS THE COURT CASE OVER WHOLE LOTTA LOVE AND EVERYTHING. BUT THEN AGAIN THEY STOLE FROM THE REALLY GREY AREA. THE PROBLEM I HAVE WITH THAT, AND I'LL BE HATED FOR SAYING THIS, IS THAT WHY BANDS LIKE ZEPPELIN WERE SO CONVINCING AND STILL THE MUSIC STANDS UP TODAY IS BECAUSE THEIR IDOLS WERE ACTUALLY PEOPLE THAT THEY GOT ALL THEIR INFLUENCE FROM. EVERYBODY FROM ROBERT JOHNSON TO MUDDY WATERS TO HOWLING WOLF, ALL OF OUR HEROES. WE USED TO GET THESE PACKAGE TOURS WITH ALL THESE PEOPLE ON THEN, IT WAS AMAZING!! I USED TO GO UP TO LIGHTNING HOPKINS AND SAY CAN I HAVE YOUR AUTOGRAPH AND HE WOULD SELL ME HIS HANKIE FOR 50P (LAUGHTER) OR WHATEVER. INCREDIBLE REALLY, SO WE USED TO GET ONCE OR TWICE A YEAR THE WHOLE PACKAGE SHOW COMING OVER.

D-JEALOUSY MAKES ME REALLY HATE HEARING ABOUT THAT!

K-WELL YEAH, ALL THOSE GROUPS ARE GONE, BUT NOW ALL THESE SORT OF TENTH GENERATION OR MUTANT OFFSPRINGS OF VILE OLD ROCK DON'T HAVE THAT SAME SORT OF LUNATIC EDGE OR WHATEVER. IT MAY BE THAT THE TECHNOLOGY MAY BE THERE BUT.. I'M MUCH MORE INTO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE SORT OF...ALL THE SORT OF HOUSE AND THE RAP AND ALL THAT SORT OF STUFF THAN I AM TO ROCK MUSIC.

D-WELL THERE'S NOTHING MUCH GOING ON IN ROCK MUSIC.

K-YES...

D-WELL, ALL OF THE SEATTLE STUFF IS A LITTLE OF A KICK START....

K-WELL YEAH, I AGREE.. LIKE YESTERDAY IN CLASS WE WERE PLAYING PEARL JAM, AND YOU COULD COMPARE IT TO EXACTLY WHAT WE WERE DOING. BUT THEY'RE A YOUNG BAND AND IN A WAY I QUITE LIKE THOSE YOUNG GROUPS, LIKE NIRVANA, TEEN SPIRIT, YOU KNOW, GREAT, IT'S SO SORT OF JUST RAW, INTELLIGENT.

D-AT THE LEAST IT'S A BREAK FROM THE NOTHINGNESS WE'VE HAD TO LISTEN TO FOR SO LONG NOW.

K-YEA, THAT SIDE OF ROCK THAT I THINK OUGHT TO BE BULLDOZED, NOT ALL THESE NEW BANDS, LIKE THE CHILI PEPPERS AND PRIMUS...

D-YEAH!

K-FUCKING GREAT! YEAH, THEY'RE LUNATICS IN A WAY AND I THINK THEY'RE GREAT, AND THAT'S WHAT IT IS, WHAT MUSIC IS ABOUT. BECAUSE ALL THE THINGS THAT WE HAD, THEY'VE GOT BUT IN ANOTHER WAY AND IT'S PLAYED IN 1992, AND IT WORKS WELL.

P-YES, YES. THAT'S RIGHT.

K-AND THERE'S A PLATFORM FOR EVERYBODY, THE KIDS IN COLLEGE WHO SORT OF SAY, OK WELL I'M NOT LISTENING TO ANYBODY BUT THESE PEOPLE. -(LAUGHTER) YOU KNOW MY HERO JUST DIED A FEW WEEKS BACK, AN ACCORDIONIST FROM ARGENTINA, ASTA PIAZZOLA (NOT SURE OF SPELLING). HE REALLY DID BEAUTIFUL MUSIC, IF HE'D HAVE BEEN AMERICAN EVERYBODY WOULD HAVE BEEN ... HE'D HAVE BEEN FRONT PAGE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES, EVERYWHERE...OH FANTASTIC! WHEN YOU HEAR OF A TANGO YOU SORT OF THINK, OH MY GOD A TANGO... BUT HE WAS LIKE JIMI HENDRIX ON THE ACCORDION (LAUGHTER).

D-JIMI HENDRIX ON THE ACCORDION???

K-YEAH, MAYBE IN FACT HE MAY HAVE DONE PURPLE HAZE, I'M NOT SURE! (LAUGHTER) BUT IT'S THE MOOD, FANTASTIC!

[FROM THIS WE WANDERED INTO A DISCUSSION OF FAIRPORT CONVENTION AND CROPREDY]

K-HAVE YOU BEEN TO SEE THEM?

D-YEAH...

K-WELL DAVE PEGG, WHO RUNS THE CROPREDY EACH YEAR, DAVE PEGG AND ROBERT GO...WELL IT GOES BACK TO THE BAND OF JOY DAYS ACTUALLY, HE WAS UMMM..

P-DAVE PEGG SHOULD HAVE BEEN THE BASS PLAYER, NOT ME (LAUGHTER), AND THAT'S WHAT HAPPENED, DAVE PEGG OPTED OUT.

K-YEAH WELL, BUT WE GOT A BETTER BASS PLAYER IN THE END! (LAUGHTER)

P-HA HA, YEAH...

K-HE'S GOT MUCH MORE HAIR THAN PEGGY! (LAUGHTER)

[DISCUSSION THEN WENT TO ZEP AND HOW BIG THEY STILL ARE TODAY, WHICH LED TO...]

K-WELL ... UMMM.... WE'LL REFORM THE BAND OF JOY (LAUGHTER) AND SEE IF WE CAN GET SOME THINGS OUT OF THE CAN AND UMMM (LAUGHTER)

D-SO WHEN IS THE REUNION???

K-WELL, IT'S STRANGE REALLY, THINKING ABOUT A REUNION, BECAUSE WE, PAUL CAN HELP ME ON THIS, THERE WAS THE BAND OF JOY ALBUM WHICH WE DID

P-YES, THIS WAS ABOUT 10 YEARS DOWN THE ROAD. SOME GUYS FROM A BAND CALLED POSSESSED HAD DIED IN A CAR ACCIDENT, INCLUDING A GOOD FRIEND OF ROBERT'S, AND S0 WE ALL GOT TOGETHER AGAIN AND DID SOME CHARITY GIGS TO RAISE MONEY FOR THE FAMILIES. SO WE TURNED UP IN VARIOUS PUBS AND CLUBS IN KIDDERMINSTER AND BIRMINGHAM, AND IT WAS A SORT OF ORGANIZED CHAOS. SO, THAT'S WHEN I MET KEVIN AGAIN AFTER ALL THOSE YEARS, AND WE SAID YES, WE'LL GET THE BAND BACK TOGETHER, ROB PLANT AND THE BAND OF JOY, AND WE'D MAKE A RECORD. THAT'S WHAT WAS HAPPENING, AND IN THE END ROBERT NEVER MADE IT BECAUSE OF A TRAGEDY IN HIS FAMILY.

K-YES...

P-SO WE JUST CARRIED ON...

D-SO THIS WAS IN THE MID 70'S?

K-YES, AROUND 1976-77. AT THAT TIME, SUDDENLY THERE WAS THIS WOMAN ON A TV SHOW GOING FUCK OFF!!!, AND IT WAS JOHNNY ROTTEN AND PUNK, AND I'M GOING 'GOD WHAT'S HAPPENING!'

P-AND WE WERE WALKING AROUND IN LONDON DRESSED JUST LIKE THIS (POINTS TO OLD BAND OF JOY PHOTO) ONLY IT WAS TEN YEARS LATER..

K-WE WERE ALIENS!

P-WE WERE IMMEDIATELY OUT OF PLACE AND WE HADN'T EVEN STARTED YET BUT WE SOON WERE ...AND THE ALBUM...

K-WELL, A FRIEND OF OURS CAME ROUND, AND WANTED TO KNOW IF WE HAD ANY SONGS FROM THAT SORT OF PERIOD FOR A BAND HE WAS MANAGING, ANYWAY, AND THEN WE MADE THE ALBUM AND WERE DOING SORT OF NUMBERS LIKE "3 AM IN THE CITY" AND THEY SOUNDED LIKE SORT OF A MIXTURE OF THE FIRST JEFF BECK AND ROD STEWART BAND, AS IN "ROCK ME 'SORT OF, WITH STEELY DAN SORT OF HARMONY VOCALS, THEN THERE WAS A MISTAKE.

P-WELL THEY PRINTED STUFF IN THE BRITISH PAPERS LIKE "I COULD HEAR ROBERT IN THE BACKGROUND", AND ROBERT DIDN'T COME ANYWHERE NEAR IT... IT WAS KEVIN, MYSELF, OFF BASS NOW AND ONTO GUITAR, MIKE CHETWOOD ON KEYBOARDS, HE HAD A GROUP CALLED TAPAU AND THAT HAD JUST SPLIT UP, AND ON DRUMS FRANCISCO NIZZA, A BIG 6'4, 6'3 GUY, REALLY COOL, GOOD DRUMMER, JOHN PASTERNAK ON BASS, WHO HAS UNFORTUNATELY SINCE DIED, A GOOD FRIEND OF KEVIN'S. WE HAD A MANAGER NAMED CLIVE SELLWOOD, AND SO WE RECORDED THE ALBUM ON POLYDOR, AND IT DID OK, I THINK THE RECORD COMPANY GOT THEIR MONEY BACK.

K-ONE NICE THING ABOUT IT WAS THAT WE DIDN'T TRY TO SOUND LIKE THE BAND OF JOY OF OLD. WE WERE TOTALLY, MUCH MORE PUNKIER, FAST, SORT OF UP TEMPO. YOU MUST GET A COPY OF THAT BECAUSE YOU'D ENJOY IT...

P-YEAH, IT'S JUST CALLED THE BAND OF JOY.

K-YEAH, IN FACT WE RELEASED THE ALBUM IN THE STATES, IT WAS AROUND 77, AROUND THAT TIME. I'M NOT SURE THOUGH BECAUSE WHAT HAPPENED WAS THAT THE MANAGING GUY FROM HERE TRANSFERRED TO OTHER PARTS AND THEN A NEW GUY CAME IN AND RIGHT AWAY HE SAID BASICALLY "WHAT'S WITH THIS GROUP,THEY LOOK SORT OF OLD. OH YEAH, YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE A TWIN-NECKED GUITAR IN THIS DAY AND AGE", SO RIGHT AWAY THE WHOLE THING WAS FORGOTTEN, WHICH IS A SHAME REALLY.

P-YEAH, BUT THEN WE DID ANOTHER.

K-'24K' WASN'T IT?

P-YEAH, THAT WAS ABOUT FIVE YEARS LATER, ABOUT 92, ON CLIVE SELLWOOD'S LABEL, THUNDERBOLT. THAT WAS OUR FINAL THING AS THE BAND OF JOY. WE PLAYED FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN WE SPLIT UP AND WENT OUR SEPARATE WAYS AGAIN.

D-YOU REALIZE THAT THERE ARE SEVERAL OF THE EARLY DEMOS OUT ON BOOTLEG, BUT NOT ALL.

K-WELL THE DEMOS WERE MEMORY LANE, HEY JOE, FOR WHAT ITS WORTH, ADRIATIC SEA VIEW.

[DISCUSSION GOES OFF FOR AWHILE WITH ME SUGGESTING THEY SERIOUSLY CONSIDER RELEASING THAT STUFF ON A LEGITIMATE FORMAT FOR THE FANS. MET WITH SOME SERIOUS DISCUSSION OF THE POSSIBILITY AND SOME SURPRISE THAT SOME OF THOSE SONGS ARE COLLECTED ON BOOTLEGS!]

D-WHAT IS THE STORY OF THE BAND OF JOY DEMOS?

P-THEY WERE THE HIGHLIGHT OF MY CAREER!

K-DENNY CORDELL, WHO PRODUCED ALL THE MOVE RECORDS, PICKED UP ON THE DEMOS, AND ROBERT SAID 'OK I'M GOING TO LONDON WITH THE DEMOS', AND DENNY WAS REALLY OVER THE MOON ABOUT THEM THE NEXT WE HEARD AND ROBERT WAS KNOCKING ON THE DOOR SAYING 'YEAH THEY LOVE IT!'. BUT THEN SOMEHOW IT GOT MESSED UP, ROBERT SAID COME ON AND LET'S GO MEET DENNY AND HE DIDN'T COME BACK. SO WE WENT DOWN AND HE SAID 'GREAT LET'S GO IN THE STUDIO', AND DENNY SAID 'THERE'S A GUITAR', HE STUCK IT IN MY HAND AND SAID 'WRITE SOMETHING!'. AT THAT AGE WE REALLY HADN'T STARTED WRITING, SO HE SAID, 'OK I'LL GIVE YOU A TENNER OR SOMETHING AND PUT YOU UP AT THE MADISON HOTEL, GO WRITE A SONG AND COME BACK IN THE MORNING.' SO THERE WAS ROBERT AND I WITH A BORROWED GUITAR, AND WE SAID 'WELL WE BETTER COME UP WITH SOMETHING.' SO WE DID THIS WILD THING WITH LIKE ONE BAR, AND WE WENT BACK THE NEXT DAY AND OF COURSE THAT KILLED US (LAUGHTER), AND PAUL PICKED US UP COMING BACK OFF THE MOTORWAY ABOUT 10:30 THAT NIGHT, WE HAD NO MONEY FOR TRAIN FARE, AND HE MET US AND WE GAVE HIM THE EXCITING NEWS.

P-DIDN'T THAT GET PUT OUT?

K-NO I DON'T THINK SO. A FEW YEARS BACK WE WERE GOING TO MAKE A 12 INCH OUT OF THE DEMOS FOR THE COLLEGE, BUT WE COULDN'T GET ALL THE PERMISSIONS FROM FAMILY OR WHATEVER, AND WE DIDN'T DO IT, AND AS DIANE SAID IT'S ALREADY BOOTLEGGED...

[The track 'Adriatic Sea View' was officially released on a charity compilation tape that had extremely limited distribution in the Midlands. This tape was later made available exclusively through Nirvana Magazine.]

K-WHEN YOU GET INTO THAT, THAT SORT OF REALLY EARLY BAND OF JOY STUFF, ROBERT'S VOICE. AMAZING ISN'T IT? YOU KNOW TO BE 19.

P-YEAH, THE VOICE WAS OUTRAGEOUS.

K-YEAH, I'VE GOT AN, OR I DID HAVE SOMEWHERE HAVE MADE A SORT OF IMPERSONATION OF JACK JONES. DO YOU REMEMBER THAT ONE. IT WAS AHHH!

P-OH YEAH. [SOME LAUGHTER]

K-THEY LIKE TOOK HIM IN THE STUDIO AND SAID, "OK BOY, WE'RE GOING TO MAKE YOU A STAR!"

D-YEAH, ONE OF THE FIRST SINGLES WITH CBS.

K-YEAH, AND THEN HE DID A REMARKABLE COVER WITH LISTEN CALLED "YOU BETTER RUN".

D-AND WHO WERE THESE "TENNESEE TEENS", ANY BAND OF JOY FOLKS IN THAT?

P-NO, I KNOW THEM, BECAUSE I WAS PLAYING IN A DIFFERENT BAND YEARS AGO. I NEVER ACTUALLY SAW ROBERT PLAY WITH THEM, BUT I MET THE GUY WHO PLAYED BASS, AND A CHAP CALLED MICK REEVES, THE SON OF THE GUY WHO DIED IN THE ACCIDENT YEARS AND YEARS AGO. AND THEY WERE SORT OF A MOD BAND. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER BAND CALLED 'THE SHAKEDOWN SOUND' WHERE KEVIN WAS ALREADY A BIT OF A BLOOMING STAR.

K-YEAH, THEY DID SORT OF JAMAICAN FLAVOURED STUFF LIKE 'THE HARDER THEY FALL' OR...

P-WHAT WAS THAT...'GIVE A LITTLE, TAKE A LITTLE', REMEMBER THAT?

K-YEAH, OUR BAND WAS REALLY SORT OF RIVAL TO ROBERT, HE HAD A GROUP CALLED THE BANNED FROM UP THE ROAD, FROM STOURBRIDGE, AND WE WOULD PLAY THE USUAL CIRCUIT, PAUL WAS IN A BAND CALLED THE SHOOTING STARS AND THERE WAS ABOUT THREE BANDS THAT PLAYED ALL AROUND THIS CIRCUIT..PLAYING THREE AND FOUR GIGS A NIGHT..AND ANYWAY WE WERE SORT A RIVAL BAND TO ROBERT'S, WHO WAS MUCH MORE SORT OF BLUES BASED.

D-HOW MANY VARIATIONS ON THE BAND OF JOY WERE THERE?

P-WELL, WHEN I FIRST MET ROBERT, HE HAD A BAND CALLED ROBERT PLANT AND THE BAND OF JOY, THIS WAS WITH MICK REEVES, VERNON PRARRERA, PETER ROBINSON, AND CHRIS BROWN. THIS WAS JUST A LOCAL BAND, THEY DIDN'T PLAY OUTSIDE TOWN, JUST LOCALLY, AND ROBERT APPEARED ON THE SCENE AND THEY SAID THIS IS OUR NEW SINGER, AND IT LASTED ABOUT 3 OR 4 MONTHS I THINK.

D-IS IT TRUE THAT ROBERT GOT FIRED FROM THAT FIRST VERSION, BEING TOLD THAT HE COULDN'T SING?

P-YEAH, THAT'S THE ONE WHERE THEY SAID WE DON'T NEED YOU ANYMORE.

K-WE WEREN'T INVOLVED UNTIL LATER.

D-WHAT ABOUT THE VERSION THAT PAINTED THEIR FACES?

K-YEAH, THAT WAS BEFORE US....

P-THEY WERE CALLED 'THE PAINT' AND ROBERT WAS WITH THEM FOR ABOUT ANOTHER SIX MONTHS MAYBE, NOT EVEN THAT, AND THEY PAINTED THEIR FACES AND WORE ALL THESE HIPPY CLOTHES AND STUFF.

D-AND THEN THE NEXT BAND INCLUDED YOU?

P-YES,THAT'S WHEN I MET YOU KEVIN.

K-YES, I WAS IN WITH THE JIMMY CLIFF BAND, PAUL WAS WITH THE SHOOTING STARS BAND, JOHN BONHAM WAS IN 'WAY OF LIFE '- AND ROBERT CAME OUT OF THAT GROUP AND SAID, OK I'M GOING TO FORM SOMETHING NOW. WHICH IS WHEN DAVE PEGG WAS AROUND, I THINK DAVE PEGG AND JOHN BONHAM WERE TOGETHER IN THE SAME GROUP, AND JOHN SAID YEA I'M GONNA JOIN, AND THEN HE RECOMMENDED PAUL OR KNEW PAUL.

P-YEAH, I'D NEVER MET KEVIN, I'D SEEN HIM ON STAGE WITH JIMMY CLIFF AND THOUGHT HE WAS GREAT, AND THEN SUDDENLY HE WAS STANDING AT THE FRONT DOOR WITH ROBERT! I KNEW ROBERT, BUT I DIDN'T KNOW KEVIN.

K-SO WE DECIDED TO FORM A GROUP. AND WE ALL HAD OUR INFLUENCES, WE ALL WANTED TO PLAY SORT OF. I HAD MY FIRST VELVET UNDERGROUND, ROBERT HAD HIS MOBY GRAPE, WE ALL SORT OF LOVED THIS HARD SORT OF WEST COAST STUFF.

P-YEAH, WE LOVED IT!

K-AND WE ALSO DID STUFF LIKE THE LEMON SONG AND BLUES BASED STUFF.

P-BUT WE DIDN'T HAVE JOHN BONHAM AS THE FIRST DRUMMER, THERE WAS ANOTHER GUY.

K-YEAH, OF COURSE.

P-AND ROBERT WANTED JOHNNY BONHAM SO WE USED TO END UP GOING AROUND AT ALL HOURS TO SEE HIM AT GIGS AND SAY, YEA, COME ON, JOIN THE BAND.

K-AND THEN WE PLAYED GIGS AT LIKE MIDDLE EARTH, THE SPEAKEASY. AND AT THAT TIME EVERYBODY WAS GOING DOWN, LIKE CLAPTON, HENDRIX. I'LL ALWAYS REMEMBER THIS GUY WHO WAS RUNNING A PLACE SAYING "MY GOD THIS IS THE BEST BAND WE'VE SEEN IN THE LAST THREE MONTHS!" PLAYING A LONDON VENUE AND THEY'RE SAYING WE'RE THE BEST BAND.. YOU REMEMBER?

P-YEAH, WE WERE SORT OF POP STARS WITH NO AUDIENCE--PLAYING FOR VIRTUALLY NOBODY BUT ENJOYING IT. PLAYED WITH FAIRPORT CONVENTION, BEFORE DAVE PEGG JOINED THEM.

K-SANDY DENNY WAS IN THE BAND AT THAT TIME, TREVOR LUCAS.

P-TIM ROSE. WE PLAYED WITH HIM SEVERAL TIMES WHEN HE'D COME OVER FROM THE STATES AND WE WERE SORT OF THE WARM UP BAND.

K-YEAH, AND WE BLEW HIM OFF STAGE! (LAUGHTER)

P-YEAH, BUT HE WAS GREAT

K-I REMEMBER WHEN HE DID MORNING DEW, AND THERE WAS SOME QUESTION.

P-DIDN'T HE WRITE IT.

K-I DON'T THINK HE DID, NO.

P-AND HE ALSO DID HEY JOE.

K-WELL WE WERE DOING THAT IN OUR SET BEFORE TIM ROSE.

P-WE PLAYED ALOT WITH THE TERRY REID BAND, HE WAS A GREAT SINGER, WE REALLY ADMIRED HIM AND HIS BAND.

D-I READ AN INTERVIEW WITH HIM NOT LONG AGO, ABOUT WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN, BECAUSE HE CAME S0 CLOSE.

P-YEAH, TO BEING IN ZEPPELIN. IT WOULD'NT HAVE BEEN THE SAME THOUGH, WOULD IT? BECAUSE ROBERT YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THOSE DAYS, 18-19 YEARS OLD, PEOPLE WERE TAKEN ABACK. HE'D WALK INTO A PARTY AND ALL THE WOMEN THERE YOU KNOW WOULD BE JUST STANDING THERE GOING 'AHHH'. THEY WERE ALWAYS REALLY TAKEN WITH ROBERT YOU KNOW, EVEN MY WIFE! ALL THE GIRLS WERE JUST FASCINATED, AND THE GUYS WERE TOO IN A DIFFERENT SORT OF WAY. I MEAN, HE ALWAYS HAS SOMETHING TO SAY YOU KNOW, HE CAN ALWAYS COME UP WITH A GOOD STORY. I HAVE SEEN ROBERT IN A QUIET MOMENT, BUT NOT VERY OFTEN, NOT WHEN THERE'S OTHER PEOPLE AROUND.

D-HE'S ALWAYS ON STAGE IN A WAY?

P-YEAH, I MEAN IF YOU'VE GOT FIFTY PEOPLE AROUND, HE STARTS ENTERTAINING REALLY. BUT ANYWAY, WE ALWAYS PLAYED JUST LIKE THE RECORD, WITH ALL THE MISTAKES, WE NEVER PLAYED ANY DIFFERENT, IT WAS AMAZING STUFF, THAT BUILD UP TO THE END.

K-THE BEST THING ABOUT ROCK AND ROLL AT THAT TIME WAS THAT YOU JUST SORT OF SAID FUCK YOU AND JUST PLAYED DIDN'T YOU, AND NOW YOU KNOW IT'S JUST SORT OF TO PLAY LIKE THAT WAS REALLY GREAT, YOU DON'T REALLY CARE ABOUT THE TUNE AND JUST PLAY...

P-YEAH, BUT IF YOU DO THAT TODAY YOU CAN'T HAVE SOMETHING LIKE ALBUM OF THE WEEK! BUT WE USED TO STAND AND PLAY FOR ABOUT AN HOUR AND A HALF, REALLY HEAVY BLUES WASN'T IT?

K-WELL SORT OF A MIXTURE OF BLUES AND WHAT WE WERE GETTING FROM THE AMERICAN BANDS. WE DID SOME SONGS BY TIM HARDEN, STUFF LIKE "HANG ONTO A DREAM", STUFF THAT WE HAD SORT OF MUTILATED.

P-BUT OUR VERSIONS WERE GREAT, WE COULD TAKE VIRTUALLY ANY SONG.

K-YEAH, THEY WERE GREAT SONGS AND IN A WAY WERE THE SORT OF BLUEPRINTS. I MEAN A LOT OF THE SONGS THAT CAME OUT OF THE BAND OF JOY FITTED RIGHT IN TO THAT FIRST ZEPPELIN ALBUM.

P-WELL WITH BOTH ROBERT AND JOHNNY BONHAM.

D-I'VE WONDERED WHY IN THE PAST SO MUCH HAS BEEN SAID ABOUT THE INFLUENCE ZEPPELIN GOT FROM THE YARDBIRDS, BUT VERY LITTLE IS MENTIONED ABOUT THE INFLUENCE OF THE BAND OF JOY.

K-YEAH, YOU'RE RIGHT, BUT THEN AGAIN, YOU HAD SOMEBODY LIKE JIMMY PAGE, WHO WAS A GREAT PRODUCER, A VERY EXPERIENCED GUY IN THE STUDIO. NONE OF US REALLY HAD ANY IDEA HOW TO WORK IN A STUDIO. HE'D GROWN UP WITH PEOPLE LIKE NEIL CHRISTIAN & THE CRUSADERS AND STUFF, AND HAD LIKE 6 OR 7 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE.

D-BUT IN TERMS OF THE HISTORY BROUGHT INTO THE BAND, THE INFLUENCES...

K-WELL THE YARDBIRDS DID HAVE A LOT OF HITS, DIDN'T THEY? THEY WERE REALLY SORT OF A WIMPISH BAND TO BE HONEST, AND THEY USED TO COME AND PLAY KIDDY TOWN HALL.

P-WE PLAYED BETTER BLUES.

D-THEY HAD A BIGGER NAME SO THEY GOT MORE CREDIT?

P-YEAH, WHEN THEY SAID THE NEW YARDBIRDS ROBERT SORT OF WENT "HUH, THE NEW YARBIRDS??"

K-I ALWAYS REMEMBER ROBERT SAYING THAT WHEN HE FIRST MET JIMMY, JIMMY LIVED ON A HOUSEBOAT, HE WENT DOWN TO DISCUSS HIS JOINING UP, AND TOOK HIM ONE OF OUR DEMOS. ROBERT WAS RECOMMENDED BY TERRY REID AND HE WAS LIKE FALLING APART BECAUSE IN THOSE DAYS PEOPLE WERE JUST SORT OF PACKING UP YOU KNOW, NOT BEING ABLE TO SURVIVE, AND THEN TERRY SAID 'I KNOW A GREAT SINGER' AND THEY CAME UP AND CHECKED HIM OUT, AND THAT'S HOW IT ALL SORT OF STARTED.

P-JIMMY PAGE KNEW OF THE BAND OF JOY ANYWAY, WE USED TO PLAY THIS TECHNICAL COLLEGE IN SOUTH LONDON, AND THE STUDENTS LOVED US, AND THEY USED TO SAY THEY'D TOLD JIMMY ABOUT US. AND I'D SAY 'JIMMY WHO', 'JIMMY PAGE'.

K-REALLY?

P-YEAH, JIMMY PAGE, LIVED NEXT DOOR TO THIS PLACE.

K-I DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT THAT.

P-OH YEAH, SO JIMMY PAGE ALREADY KNEW OF US, CAUSE I REMEMBER THAT PLACE AND IF HE MIXED AT ALL WITH THE LOCAL KIDS HE MIGHT HAVE SAID, "DO YOU KNOW ANY GOOD SINGERS?"

D-SO HOW LONG DID YOUR VERSION OF THE BAND OF JOY GO ON?

K-ABOUT TWO YEARS?

P-YEAH.

[KEVIN AND PAUL THEN TRY TO RUMMAGE THIER MEMORIES FOR ANY LAST TALES ABOUT PLANTY THAT MIGHT BE INTERESTING TO ME.]

P-WELL, I'LL TRY TO THINK OF SOMETHING CLEAN AND NOT THE NAUGHTY BITS.

K-PAUL, YOU'VE GOT THE BETTER MEMORY, I CAN'T EVEN REMEMBER THE NAUGHTY BITS!

P-THERE WAS A PLACE CALLED WHITBY I THINK, IN YORKSHIRE, ON THE COAST, WE PLAYED IN WHITBY SOMEWHERE. A BIG GIG WITH A FEW BANDS ON, AND WHAT WITH ALL THE GIRLS IN THE VAN.

K-ALL THE GIRLS IN THE VAN?!

P-(LAUGHTER) THERE WASN'T ROOM IN THE VAN FOR EVERYONE. SO THEY DROPPED ME OFF ON THE BEACH.

K-REALLY!

P-YEAH, I CAN'T REMEMBER WHO ELSE FROM THE BAND, BUT WE LEFT THE VAN WITH ROBERT AND JOHN, AND I SLEPT THERE ALL NIGHT ON THE BEACH. WELL IT WAS WARM ENOUGH, AND WE SLEPT THERE, AND THEY CAME ALONG ABOUT 8 O'CLOCK IN THE MORNING. AND WE SAY, WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL NIGHT, AND THEY SAY, "JOY RIDING".

K-I DON'T REMEMBER THIS ONE!

P-YOU KNOW THAT BOOK BY BRAM STOKER, DRACULA? WELL APPARENTLY THIS BEACH IN WHITBY IS WHERE THIS DRACULA GUY WASHED UP ON THE BEACH, I DIDN'T KNOW THIS. (LOTS OF LAUGHTER) THANK YOU ROBERT FOR DROPPING ME OFF AND NOT COMING BACK!! IT WAS ALWAYS THAT WAY THOUGH, TRYING TO SEE WHO COULD DROP OFF TO SLEEP AT TWO IN THE MORNING WITH ALL THE GEAR IN THE BACK OF THE VAN.

K-AND WE NEVER HAD ROADIES DID WE, WE DID ALL THE DRIVING AND STUFF OURSELVES. WE DID HAVE A FOLLOWING THOUGH, PLAYING AT PLACES LIKE THE MARQUEE.

P-YEAH, IT WAS GREAT REALLY, WE JUST SORT OF DID OUR OWN THING AND HAD A GREAT TIME.

K-DO YOU KNOW PAUL WHERE THE NAME BAND OF JOY CAME FROM? I NEVER ACTUALLY KNEW.

P-CHRIS BROWN INVENTED THE NAME, SOMEONE SAID WHAT SHALL WE CALL THE BAND AND HE SAID ROBERT PLANT AND THE BAND OF JOY, AND THE NAME SOUNDS A BIT COMICAL.

K-SORT OF LIKE THE NEW CHRISTIE MINSTRALS.

P-ON ONE OF OUR TOURS, A ONE WEEK TOUR UP NORTH, YORKSHIRE, LANCASHIRE, MANCHESTER, MISTAKENLY THEY BOOKED US AT LIKE A WORKING MEN'S CLUB, YOU KNOW AND ALL THE PEOPLE PLAY BINGO AND WHEN A BAND COMES THEY WANT LIKE COMEDY OR SOMETHING. THAT'S WHAT THEY WANTED, SO THEY THOUGHT WE WERE A COMEDY BAND, ROBERT PLANT AND THE BAND OF JOY!! YOU KNOW, ITS A WORKING MANS CLUB, IT'S DINNERTIME, YOU HAVE A FEW PINTS AND YOU WATCH A COMEDIAN OR A BALLAD SINGER OR A STRIPPER, SOMETHING LIKE THAT. S0 WHAT DID WE DO, WE DIDN'T PLAY ANY OF OUR MASSIVE GREAT HEAVY BLUES, BUT SOME SIMPLE ROCK TUNES, HOPING THAT THESE PEOPLE HAD HEARD THEM BEFORE, AND YOU COULD SEE THAT SOME OF THEM ENJOYED IT, BUT BECAUSE IT WAS OLDER PEOPLE, 50, 60, OR 70, WE DIDN'T EVEN FINISH THE WEEK OUT!
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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

February 07, 1962 - Deborah Bonham, sister to John, was born in Redditch, Worcestershire, England
February 23, 1966 - Warren Grant, son of Peter, was born.
February xx, 1969 - Led Zeppelin enters the Billboard Top 40
February 16, 1969 - Led Zeppelin wrap up their first American tour in Baltimore, MD.
February 07, 1970 - Edinburgh gig cancelled after Plant receives facial injuries in a car accident
February 28, 1970 - The band performs as "The Nobs" in Copenhagen after threat of legal action from Countess Von Zeppelin
February xx, 1971 - John Paul Jones involved in legal issues regarding a musician who shares the same name
February xx, 1971 - Overdubs for the fourth album are recorded at Island Studios
February 14, 1972 - The band is refused admission into Singapore due to their long hair
February 16, 1972 - The Australian tour begins in Perth
February 21, 1972 - Led Zeppelin: Rock and Roll b/w Four Sticks (Atlantic 45-2865) 45 single is released in the US.
February xx, 1973 - The band makes final preparations for the European tour
February 16, 1973 - The release date for Houses Of The Holy is pushed back due to some sleeve problems
February xx, 1974 - Sessions for Physical Graffiti continue
February 14, 1974 - Page, Plant and Bonham attend a Roy Harper concert
February 04, 1975 - Zeppelin perform a last minute show at Nassau Coliseum to accomodate fans after being banned in Boston
February 24, 1975 - Physical Graffiti finally issued worldwide to phenomenal sales
February xx, 1976 - Media reports that Zeppelin are due to release an album entitled Obelisk
February xx, 1977 - Robert contracts a bout of tonsillitis postponing the American tour
February xx, 1978 - Robert Plant helps produce a record for punk band Dansette Damage
February 16, 1978 - The cases against Bonham, Cole & Grant stemming from the Oakland incident are heard and all receive suspended prison sentences and fines
February xx, 1979 - Although absent from the US stage or market, Led Zeppelin rank best in many music magazine categories
February xx, 1979 - Mixing sessions for In Through The Out Door take place at Polar Studios. Rumors fly of a European tour
February 03, 1980 - Robert joins Dave Edmund’s Rockpile at the Birmingham Top Rank
February 13, 2005 - Led Zeppelin receives a Grammy for Lifetime Achievment.
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