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Jen Cry Baby Wah

Jen Cry Baby Wah
General Specs
Years in use: ca. 1993-Present
This pedal was manufactured in Italy and Jen was eventually purchased by the Thomas Church company. Another famous Jen Wah user was Jimi Hendrix.

The Jen Cry Baby Wah is part of the Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard.

Photos

Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard
Jimmy Page, ca. 2008, It Might Get Loud, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios, Burbank, California
Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard
Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard

Yamaha CH-10 MKII Chorus Pedal

Yamaha CH-10 MKII Chorus Pedal
General Specs
Controls: Speed, Depth
Connectors: Input, Mono Output, Stereo Output
Years in use: ca. 1993-Present
Website: http://usa.yamaha.com/
The Yamaha CH-10 MKII Chorus Pedal may have been used prior to the Coverdale-Page days. It was later incorporated into the Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard.

1964 Epiphone Rivoli EB232 Bass

1964 Epiphone Rivoli EB232 Bass
Jimmy Page & Chris Dreja, August 12, 1966, Indiana Beach Ballroom, Monticello, Indiana
General Specs
Body: Archtop
Finish: Sunburst
Neck: Thru body
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl dot inlays
Frets: 19
Headstock: Black
Tuners: Gibson EB right-angled
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: Black Florentine
Pickups: Gibson P-90
Controls: Volume and Tone knobs & tone selector switch
Years in use: 1966
Website: http://www.epiphone.com/
This bass guitar was played by Paul Samwell-Smith from May 1963 to June 18, 1966, Jimmy Page from June 21, 1966 to August 23, 1966 and Chris Dreja from August 25, 1966 - July 7, 1968.

The Rivoli, with a thin-line, semi-hollow body, was introduced in 1959, two years after Epiphone was bought by Chicago Musical Instrument Company (CMI), also the owner of Gibson. The Rivoli went in and out of production during the next decade until it was permanently discontinued in 1970. The Rivoli was Epiphone's most expensive electric bass in 1968, offered at $425.

Photos

1964 Epiphone Rivoli EB232 Bass
Jimmy Page & Chris Dreja, August 12, 1966, Indiana Beach Ballroom, Monticello, Indiana
1964 Epiphone Rivoli EB232 Bass
Jimmy Page, August 22, 1966, Where The Action Is, Malibu, California

Theremin

Sonic Wave Theremin
Theremin
Sonic Wave Theremin, Whole Lotta Love,
Madison Square Garden, New York City,
New York, July 28, 1973
General Specs
Years in use: April 26, 1969-July 7, 1980
The theremin was originally the product of Russian government-sponsored research into proximity sensors. The instrument was invented by a young Russian physicist named Lev Sergeivich Termen (known in the West as Léon Theremin) in October 1920 after the outbreak of the Russian civil war. After positive reviews at Moscow electronics conferences, Theremin demonstrated the device to Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin. Lenin was so impressed with the device that he began taking lessons in playing it, commissioned six hundred of the instruments for distribution throughout the Soviet Union, and sent Theremin on a trip around the world to demonstrate the latest Soviet technology and the invention of electronic music.

The theremin is unique among musical instruments in that it is played without physical contact. The musician stands in front of the instrument and moves his or her hands in the proximity of two metal antennae. The distance from one antenna determines frequency (pitch), and the distance from the other controls amplitude (volume). Most frequently, the right hand controls the pitch and the left controls the volume, although some performers reverse this arrangement.

Jimmy Page used the Sonic Wave Theremin with a Maestro Echoplex and Orange amps and cabinets in Led Zeppelin.

Between March and May 1971, Jimmy used a double-stacked Theremin.

Photos

Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, January 24, 1970, University of Leeds, West Refectory, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page & Double Theremin, March 11, 1971, University of Southampton, West Refectory, Garden Court, Southampton, England
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page & Double Theremin, March 18, 1971, Mayfair Ballroom, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page & Double Theremin, May 3, 1971, KB Hallen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page, December 7-8, 1972, Hard Rock Concert Theatre, Manchester, England
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page, May 22, 1973, HemisFair Arena, San Antonio, Texas
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page, ca. 1975
Sonic Wave Theremin
Jimmy Page, ca. 1977
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
Sonic Wave Theremin
 
   
 

Custom Theremin

Theremin
Custom Theremin, Whole Lotta Love,
U.N.O. Lakefront Arena, New Orleans,
Louisiana, October 1, 1998
General Specs
Years in use: April 29, 1995-ca. 2008
When Page and Plant began playing Whole Lotta Love again, beginning in April 29, 1995, Jimmy Page had a Custom Theremin built for the Theremin Duel section. Page used (2) Maestro Echoplex EP-3 units with the Theremin.

Page continued to use the Custom Theremin on the 1998 Page and Plant tour, the 1999-2000 Page/Crowes tour as well as the December 10, 2007 Led Zeppelin reunion concert.

There was a demonstration of the Custom Theremin by Jimmy Page for The Edge and Jack White in the movie It Might Get Loud at Warner Brothers Burbank Studios, Burbank, California.

Photos

Custom Theremin
Jimmy Page, October 13, 1999, Roseland Ballroom, New York City, New York
Custom Theremin
Jimmy Page, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England
Custom Theremin
Jimmy Page, It Might Get Loud, ca. 2008

Resources and Information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theremin

Herco Flex 75 Picks

Herco Flex 75 Picks
General Specs
Features: World-famous Herco Nylon Flat Picks feature uniform thickness and are extremely durable and long lasting. Made from high quality Nylon material. The unique pattern on the picks insures a slip-proof grip.
Years in use:
Website: http://www.jimdunlop.com/
Jimmy Page said in a 1977 interview with Steven Rosen that he used Herco Flex 75 Picks.

Photos:

Herco Flex 75 Picks
Jimmy Page playing the Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop , Going To California, March 20, 1971, The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, England

Strings

Ernie Ball Super Slinky Strings
General Specs
Features: Wound strings: Made from nickel plated steel wire wrapped around a hex shaped steel core wire - Plain Strings: Made of specially tempered tin plated high carbon steel
Gauge: e-.08 (banjo string)
B-.11
G-.16
D-.24
A-.32
E-.42
Used on: Electric guitars
Website: http://www.ernieball.com/
Jimmy Page said in a 1977 interview with Steven Rosen that he used Ernie Ball Super Slinky strings.
 
Ernie Ball Earthwoods Light Strings
General Specs
Features: Made from 80% copper, 20% zinc wire wrapped around hex shaped tin plated steel core wire.
Gauge: e-.11
B-.15
G-.22
D-.30
A-.42
E-.52
Used on: Acoustic guitars
Website: http://www.ernieball.com/

Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER

Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER
Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER, ca. 1977
General Specs
Features: Power Switch, Operate/Calibrate Switch, Tone Selector Knob, Gain Control, Signal Input Jack
Years in use: November 30, 1972-July 24, 1977
Website: http://www.petersontuners.com/
index.cfm?category=26&page=2
Jimmy Page's guitar technician Raymond Thomas used the Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER to tune Page's guitars behind his backline.

Photos:

Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER
Jimmy Page, January 22, 1973, Southampton University, Southampton, England
Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER
Jimmy Page, February 16, 1975, St. Louis Arena, St. Louis, Missouri
Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER
Led Zeppelin, ca. November 1976, Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England
Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER
Bonham, Page, Plant, ca. 1977
Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, July 17, 1977, The Kingdome, Seattle, Washington
Conn ST-6 StroboTUNER

Cello Bow » John Vogel

LED ZEPPELIN FANS: This is a once in a lifetime opportunity. A VIOLIN BOW actually played with by Jimmy Page on the 1977 Led Zeppelin Tour is offered for sale. My name is John Vogel and I worked on that tour with the lighting crew. I also had 2 other jobs during that show. I was in charge of John Bonham's drum riser when it rolled down to the front of the stage and back for his drum solo. I also set the chairs on stage and took them off for Jimmy Page and John Bonham for the acoustic set by the band during the middle of the concert. I was on the whole tour and worked every show until it was abruptly halted because of the death of Robert Plant's son. We did 45 days in 26 different cities over a 4 month period. The last month of the tour was cancelled. I got the violin bow from Raymond Thomas, Jimmy Page's personal guitar roadie, one night after a show. This BOW is a very unique item and an incredible piece of Rock @ Roll History. I know for a fact that there are not many of these out there, let alone finding someone who is willing to give theirs up. This is a VERY RARE Item, maybe the only one ever to be offered for sale. It is 24 years old. It is from the last North American Tour Led Zeppelin ever did. As you know, John Bonham died in 1980, and Led Zeppelin broke up, bever to tour again. That is what makes this Bow so VALUABLE. There are not very many of them out there and there WON't be any of them EVER AGAIN. Sure, you could probably get a violin bow that has been played by Jimmy Page, but NOT ONE by him when he was in Led Zeppelin. And since Led Zeppelin will NEVER get back together again, NO ONE is going to be making any NEW ONES. To me, Led Zeppelin was the GREATEST Band of all time. And Jimmy Page is the GREATEST Guitar player of all time. And still to this day the only one that uses a Violin Bow to play his guitar. Led Zeppelin was a phenomenon. Every show on the tour sold our in 8 to 15 minutes. Scalper ticket were going from $750 to $1500. The Violin Bow has (Czechoslovakia A. Prager) manufacturers markings on it. It is brown wood and white horse hair strings. It is about 3' long, with about 20 busted strings on it, which are all different lengths from when he would band it against his guitar strings during a guitar solo. "DANT, DANT ---- DANT, DANT, etc." It has a silver knob on the bottom with a black stripe around it. On the wood sleeve, about 6" from the bottom, it has Black Leather wrapped around it with 8 white stripes. The part on the bottom that holds the wood sleeve from the strings is black with a silver pearl spot in the middle. Below you will find 19 pictures that I hope will provide the PROOF that what I say is TRUE. The pictures take about 4 minutes to download, so PLEASE be patient. (1) the VIOLIN BOW itself (2) closeup of violin bow with manufacturers name (Czechoslovakia A. Prager) (3) the 'CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY' (4,5,6) Jimmy playing with a violin bow in concert (7) me in my bedroom holding the VIOLIN BOW in front of the blowup picture of me onstage with Jimmy Page (8)the bow and my SHOWCO/Led Zeppelin T-shirts from the tour (9) my ANVIL briefcase with my Led Zeppelin '77 Tour Backstage passes (10) me carrying John Bonham's chair offstage with Jimmy page sitting in the background (11,12,13,14) more pictures of me onstage with Jimmy page (15) my 3 laminate backstage passes, one for each leg of the tour (16) the 3 tour itineraries with my name in the upper right hand corner (17, 18, 19) First page of each of the itineraries showing tour dates and members of the crew. My name is in the upper right hand corner of each page. People, This is a ONCE IN A LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY!!! This is a legit, unique opportunity for someone to own an INCREDIBLE piece of Rock @ Roll history. INCLUDED IN THE PURCHASE OF THE VIOLIN BOW, the PURCHASER will also RECEIVE 'FREE OF CHARGE' the following {1} the ONE and ONLY 'CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY' for this VIOLIN BOW, and in a picture frame {2} COPIES of the 5 photos of me on stage with Jimmy Page {3} COPIES of the 3 tour itineraries {1st, 2nd, and 3rd leg) {4} COPIES of the 3 laminate backstage tour passes (red, white, and gray) {5} A SET OF 35 PHOTOS from the 1977 Led Zeppelin tour. They are all 5x5 color photos. All are CLOSEUPS taken from onstage or fro mthe first row of the audience. I took 160 photos during the tour and recently picked out the 35 BEST and had some copies made. They are EXCELLENT! They are described as follow: 1) Jimmy playing with the violin bow (front view) like on ebay ad 2) Jimmy Page playing with the violin bow (side view) like on ebay ad 3) Jimmy playing "Stairway to Heaven" (side view) with double neck guitar held up in air 4) Jimmy playing "Stairway to Heaven" (front view) with double neck guitar held up in air and out to side 6) Jimmy playing "Stairway to Heaven" (front view) with double neck held up in air / different from #4 7) Jimmy playing Les Paul during guitar solo (side view) down on 1 knee with guitar held over head with left hand 8) Jimmy playing Les Paul during guitar solo (rear view) down to both knees with guitar held overhead 9) Jimmy playing Les Paul (side view) with guitar held at thigh level 10) Jimmy playing Les Paul (front view) down on 1 knee bent over with his right hand pointing to floor of stage 11) Jimmy page playing Les Paul (front view) leaning backwards with guitar held overhead 12) Jimmy playing Les Paul (front view) with guitar around thighs 13) Jimmy upstage during guitar solo playing with knobs on amps doing feedback (front view) down on 1 knee 14) Jimmy upstage during guitar solo playing with knobs on amps doing feedback (side view) with guitar slung over back, right hand out 15) Jimmy upstage during guitar solo playing with knobs on amps doing feedback (front view) down on both knees 16) Jimmy upstage during guitar solo playing with knobs on amps doing feedback (front view) down on 1 knee / different pose 17) Jimmy covered with dry ice smoke up to his waist (side view) with hands pointing onstage 18) Jimmy covered with dry ice smoke up to his waist (side view) playing guitar 19) Robert singing (rear view) with microphone held up to his mouth 20) Robert standing downstage with hands on hips (rear view) 21) Robert sitting up on top of piano (side view) 22) Robert standing downstage with hands on hips & right leg raised up (front view) 23) Bonham playing drums (side view) 24) Bonham playing drums (side view) / different from # 23 25) Bonham and Keith Moon together on same drum riser playing drums (front view) 26) John Paul Jones playing bass dressed all in white (front view) 27) Band playing (side view) 28) Band playing (front view) Jimmy with legs spread playing Les Paul 29) Band playing (front view) Jimmy with legs spread playing with Les Paul 30) Band playing (side view) / different from #27 31) Band playing (side view) Jimmy bent down playing guitar 32) Band playing (side view) all upstage by drum riser 33) Band playing (front view) Robert with microphone held over his head with left hand 34) Band playing (front view) beginning notes of "Stairway to Heaven" 35) End of show / Band standing downstage center taking final bows (front view) IT's JUST LIKE YOU ARE REALLY THERE!!! These photos cover all the best and unique moments of the concert. And since I knew the show so well, I knew the exact second to take the photo. They are VERY RARE photos, and you will not find them anywhere else in the world. PURCHASING this VIOLIN BOW will make an EXCELLENT INVESTMENT. The PURCHASER should be able to re-sell it in 50 to 100 years for $1,000,000 dollars! All of these FREE items, are for the purpose of AUTHENTICITY in case you may want to re-sell the VIOLIN BOW in the future. Or, you can pass it down to your children and they will be able to re-sell it. It will be PRESERVED for future generations. As for DELIVERY. "*" I WILL SHIP IT---I have figured out a really safe way to ship it so I am offering FREE SHIPPING NOW "*" OR YOU CAN COME UP TO MY HOUSE IN HOUSTON, TEXAS AND PICK IT UP YOURSELF. AS FOR PAYMENT, I WILL ACCEPT "*"CASHIERS CHECK "*" ONLY! I WILL SEND YOU A NOTARIZED RECEIPT OF THE PURCHASE ALONG WITH THE OTHER ITEMS. ---NOTICE---!!!!! TO ANY NON-BELIEVERS OUT THERE!!!!!! I am very disappointed in you. I have only 3 words to say to you. "*YOU ARE STUPID*" Sotheby's believed me when I went to them. Do you really think I would go on the road for 4 months with Led Zeppelin (THE GREATEST ROCK&ROLL BAND IN HISTORY) and not collect some cool souvenirs? I also have a harmonica and tambourine from Robert Plant, Page guitar pick, and many Bonham drumsticks. "I SAID WHAT I MEANT, AND I MEANT WHAT I SAID." The nice people can email My home number is (M-F EVENINGS AFTER 6:00 P.M. Sat-Sun Anytime) Good Luck!

John Vogel John Vogel John Vogel
John Vogel John Vogel John Vogel
John Vogel John Vogel John Vogel
John Vogel John Vogel John Vogel
John Vogel John Vogel John Vogel
John Vogel John Vogel John Vogel
Photo by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
John Vogel
Photo by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
John Vogel
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R.I.P. John Vogel
Thanks to 3hrsoflunacy

Cello Bow » Steve Jander

Not many people can successfully play a guitar with a violin bow. But Jimmy Page has mastered this obscure art. The bow featured here was used by Page on April 20th of 1977. It was the second show at the Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati. After the show, Page’s guitar technician gave the bow to Steve Jander, the laser light engineer.

This bow is an amazing piece of rock’ n’ roll history as very few violin bows have ever been used in modern concerts. Technically, it's in remarkable condition for surviving a rock concert. Several strands of the hair frayed during the performance and have been left as they were. The extreme tip of the stick has a very small blemish that does not compromise the overall appearance or performance of the bow. The frog and pad are both in superb condition, showing just a small amount of wear form the concert. Overall, the bow is in serviceable, working condition.

Accompanying the bow is a 1977 Led Zeppelin North American Tour publication. It's a pictorial and is in NM condition. Within this booklet is a photo of Page using a violin bow with his guitar. Also accompanying the bow is a letter of provenance from Steve Jander. (Steve was employed by Showco Inc. as the director of the laser special effects department.) He received the bow from Page’s guitar technician, Raymund Thomas, after the concert.

Resources and Information:

http://www.americanmemorabilia.com/Auction_Item.asp?Auction_ID=46857

Cello Bow

Cello Bow
Cello Bow, Montreal Forum, Montreal,
Quebec, Canada, February 6, 1975
General Specs
Years in use: ca. 1965-Present

Page was not the first guitarist to use a violin bow. He was a favorite session musician of famed producer, Shel Talmy. Talmy had used Page on session work for the Who and the Kinks among others. One of Talmy's pet projects was a band called the Creation. Eddie Phillips, lead guitarist of said group, had employed a violin bow on his guitar on two 1966 singles, Painter Man and Making Time. It's worth musing over whether Page ever happened to see Phillips use the violin bow in the studio.

Page himself has claimed he didn't meet Eddie Phillips until Jim McCarty's 50th birthday party in 1994. Further, and to be fair, there are also pictures of Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett using a violin bow in concert. Eddie Phillips' underrated guitar work is now widely available with the reissue of the Creation's entire recorded legacy in the late '90s. Further, the movie, Rushmore, includes Making Time on the soundtrack.

There is a noticeable difference in the two guitar players' approach, however. Phillips' violin bowing is organic, much more integrated into the song structure itself. During Making Time, his bowing sounds very similar to feedback. When Page utilizes the effect, though, the song comes to a halt, with all attention being focused on the bowing.

In an interview in ca. 1990, Jimmy Page claimed that using a cello bow on the guitar strings was first suggested to him by session violinist, David McCallum, Sr., father of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. star, David McCallum, Jr.

He had first used it on two tracks on the Little Games LP, Glimpses and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor In Dazed and Confused, Page followed up the violin bowing with a furious spitfire solo which he had lifted from the flipside of the Yardbirds' last single, Goodnight Sweet Josephine b/w Think About It.

Jimmy Page used the cello bow on three Led Zeppelin studio tracks, Dazed And Confused & How Many More Times from Led Zeppelin and In The Evening from In Through The Out Door. On stage, Page used the cello bow throughout the entire career of Led Zeppelin for Dazed And Confused from ca. August 1967 to May 25, 1975 and How Many More Times from September 7, 1968 through January 31, 1975. On Led Zeppelin's 1977 US Tour, Page eliminated Dazed And Confused from the setlist and kept the cello bow solo as part of a Noise Solo that segued into Achilles Last Stand, that he played through August 11, 1979. Page continued the Bow Solo on The Firm's 1985-86 tour and the 1988 Outrider tour. Page used the cello bow one last time at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute concert for Dazed And Confused on December 10, 2007.

On the 1977 US Tour, it was said that Jimmy Page had a trunk filled with cello bows for the tour.

A few of these cello bows have been given to people, who have subsequently attempted to auction them online, most notably stage hand John Vogel, Laser Technician Steve Jander and Julian's Auctions.

In 1979, Steve Jander got the idea for the glowing bow at Knebworth from the part in The Song Remains The Same fantasy sequence where Jimmy waves the sword over his head and it strobes colors.

His violin bow could light up like neon and strobe colors as he waved it overhead. A powerful laser beam was emitted from the end of the bow which Jimmy could aim off into space. Two 100 micron diameter quartz fiber optic cables (with one spare) carried light from the argon and krypton lasers to a tiny lens that produced the beam and to a piece of glowing lucite rod attached to the length of the bow. Two different effects were produced - beam from the end and glowing piece of plastic attached to the bow.

There was enough power coming out the end of the bow to smoke the linoleum on the stage! Pagey almost nailed Bonzo in the face, even after Jander told him not to point it at anyone. Jander had his finger on the main shutter button and had to terminate the beam a couple of times.



Photos

Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, ca. 1967
Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, March 17, 1969,
TV Byen, Gladsaxe,
Denmark
Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, March 31, 1970,
The Spectrum, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, August 26, 1970,
Public Auditorium, Cleveland,
Ohio

Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, May 18, 1977,
Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center
Arena, Birmingham, Alabama

Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, August 4, 1979, Knebworth House Grounds, Stevenage, England
Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, November 5, 1988,
Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute Fieldhouse,
Troy, New York
Cello Bow
Jimmy Page, December 10, 2007,
O2 Arena, London, England
Cello Bow
A. Prader cello bow, made in Czechoslovakia, similar to the brand that Jimmy Page used on the 1977 US Tour

Resources and Information:

http://www.furious.com/perfect/jimmypage.html

Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer

Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer
Jimmy Page, Going To California,
ca. May 1975
General Specs
Features: Input Jack, 24-inch cable
Years in use: January 11, 1975-July 14, 1977
Website: http://www.barcusberry.com/
Jimmy Page used the Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer with the Barcus-Berry 1330S Preamp on the Martin D-28 Acoustic guitar.

Photos

Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer
Jimmy Page, Going To California,
ca. May 1975, Earls Court,
London, England
Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer
Jimmy Page, Going To California,
June 10, 1977, Madison
Square Garden, New York City,
New York
Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer
Promotional Literature

Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp

Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp
General Specs
Features: Treble, Bass, Sensitivity, Volume Controls, Input Jack, Output Jack
Years in use: January 11, 1975-July 14, 1977
Website: http://www.barcusberry.com/
Jimmy Page used the Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp with the Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer on the Martin D-28 Acoustic guitar.

Photos

Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp
Jimmy Page, Going To California, June 10, 1977, Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York
Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp
Jimmy Page, with Martin D-28 Acoustic, ca. 1977
Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp
 

VOX V846 Wah

VOX V846 Wah
General Specs
Years in use: January 11, 1975-March 27, 1975
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
The VOX V846 Wah was designed by the Thomas Organ Company, in Sepulveda, California and was manufactured in Italy for JMI. This pedal was completely black, with the "Vox" logo screen printed on the front.

Photos:

VOX V846 Wah
Jimmy Page, Rock And Roll, January 29, 1975, Greensboro Coliseum, Greensboro, North Carolina
VOX V846 Wah
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, March 24, 1975, The Forum, Inglewood, California
VOX V846 Wah

VOX King Wah

VOX King Wah
General Specs
Years in use: August 14, 1970-July 5, 1971, November 11, 1971-February 29, 1972
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
This pedal was designed by the Thomas Organ Company, in Sepulveda, California and was manufactured in Italy.

Photos:

VOX King Wah
John Bonham, August 22, 1970, Tarrant County Arena, Fort Worth, Texas. Note footswitches for Maestro Echoplex EP-2 and Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
VOX King Wah
Led Zeppelin, September 09, 1970, Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts
VOX King Wah
Led Zeppelin, March 06, 1971, Laugardalshöll Sports Arena, Reykjavik, Iceland
VOX King Wah
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, November 25, 1971, Leicester University, Percy Gee Building, Queens Hall, Leicester, East Midlands, England
VOX King Wah
Stage setup, February 20, 1972, Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia

VOX Grey Wah

VOX Grey Wah
General Specs
Features: 250mH Inductor (V846, V847, Clyde McCoy & Cry Baby used 500mH), lack of 33k resistor in parallel with inductor.
Years in use: ca. August 1966-July 19, 1970
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
Jimmy Page used the VOX Grey Wah when he switched over from the 1964 Epiphone Rivoli EB232 Bass in the Yardbirds on August 25, 1966.

This wah pedal had a tighter, thinner sweep, with a lot less low end, more emphasis on high end and upper midrange.

Page used the VOX Grey Wah in Led Zeppelin, through the July 1970 Germany dates.

Photos:

VOX Grey Wah
Jimmy Page, ca. 1967
VOX Grey Wah
Jimmy Page, October 18, 1968, Marquee Club, London, England
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, January 5-9, 1969, Whisky A Go Go, West Hollywood, California
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, March 25, 1969, Staines Lino Factory, Staines, England
VOX Grey Wah
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, May 2, 1969, Rose Palace, Pasadena, California
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, Dazed And Confused, August 18, 1969, The Rock Pile, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
VOX Grey Wah
Robert Plant & Jimmy Page, January 24, 1970, University of Leeds, The Refectory, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, November 4, 1969, Kitchener Memorial Auditorium, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, March 8, 1970, Circus Krone Bau, Munich, Germany
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, March 27, 1970, The Forum, Inglewood, California
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, June 22, 1970, Laugardalshöll Sports Arena, Reykjavik, Iceland
VOX Grey Wah
Led Zeppelin, July 19, 1970, Deutschlandhalle, Berlin, Germany
VOX Grey Wah

VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah

VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
General Specs
Years in use: August 7, 1971-September 29, 1971, May 27, 1972-July 29, 1973, May 17, 1975-ca. 2002
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
The VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah was designed by the Thomas Organ Company, in Sepulveda, California and was manufactured in Italy for JMI. This pedal was completely black, with the "Cry Baby" logo screen printed on the front.

Photos:

VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Led Zeppelin, August 08, 1971, Montreux Casino Hall, Montreux, Switzerland
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Robert Plant & Jimmy Page, September 17, 1971, Honolulu Civic Auditorium, Honolulu, Hawaii
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Led Zeppelin, June 25, 1972, The Forum, Inglewood, California
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Led Zeppelin, October 28, 1972, Pavillion Montreux, Montreux, Switzerland
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Led Zeppelin, June 02, 1973, Kezar Stadium, San Francisco, California
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Jimmy Page, JulY 17, 1973, Seattle Center Coliseum, Seattle, Washington
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Jimmy Page & John Bonham, May 18, 1975, Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, England
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Led Zeppelin, April 30, 1977, Pontiac Silverdome, Pontiac, Michigan
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Jimmy Page, July 23, 1977, Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, California
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Jimmy Page & John Paul Jones, August 04, 1979, Knebworth House Grounds, Stevenage, California
VOX 'Cry Baby' Wah
Led Zeppelin, July 05, 1980, Munich Olympiahalle, Munich, Germany

VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo 'Long Tom'

VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo 'Long Tom'
General Specs
Features: (2) Guitar Input Jacks, Microphone Input Jack, Amplifier Output Jack, Footswitch Jack, (5) Level Controls, Echo Type Selectors (Echo, Halo, Reverb, Repeat), On/Off Switch
Years in use: April 1969-September 1970
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
The VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo is a tape loop effects box that is similar in concept to a modern Echoplex.

VOX also made a smaller physically sized tape echo called the Vox CO2. These models are sometimes referred to as "long toms" and "toms" and both models share the same electronics design. The "long tom" being the larger VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo.

The basic operating principle of tape echoes is to record the original guitar or microphone signal to an endless tape. The echo effect is created by playing that recorded signal back at a slightly delayed time and at a greater or lesser volume level compared to the original. The different effect sounds are created by varying the delay times between the echoes.

Jimmy Page used the VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo from ca. April 1969 until the end of the 1970 US Tour in 1970.

Photos:

VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo 'Long Tom'
Led Zeppelin, May 11, 1969, Green Lake Aqua Theater, Seattle, Washington
VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo 'Long Tom'
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, February 28, 1970, KB Hallen, Copenhagen, Denmark
VOX CO2 Deluxe Echo 'Long Tom'
Leaving the stage, March 10, 1970, Hamburg Musikhalle, Hamburg, Germany

Univox UD-50 Uni-Drive

Univox UD-50 Uni-Drive
General Specs
Features: Pedal Range, Input Level, Amplifier Jack, Instrument Jack
Years in use: ca. March 1971
Website: http://www.univox.org/
The Univox UD-50 Uni-Drive is one of the oldest overdrive pedals that were made. Jimi Hendrix used one in the studio on certain songs while recording at the Record Plant.

It rocks back and forth, similar to a wah or volume pedal. It also has 6 overdrive adjustments using the Input Level Dialer. Each setting clicks into place and increases the amount of volume and overdrive. The Pedal Range knob adjusts the pedal's sweep/volume ratio.

The Uni-Drive has a delicate mid-range tone, in the last two stages slipping into a mid-range distortion.

This is the first endorsement of a Univox product that Jimmy Page had given. He only used the Uni-Drive pedal in March 1971, on Led Zeppelin's Return To The Clubs Tour. After he stopped using the Uni-Drive pedal, he relied on the Marshall 1959SLP Amplifiers for volume boost and distortion, while also using the Volume knobs on his guitars for fine volume tuning.

Photos

Univox UD-50 Uni-Drive
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, March 05, 1971, Ulster Hall, Belfast, Ireland
Univox UD-50 Uni-Drive
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, March 06, 1971, National Boxing Stadium, Dublin, Ireland
Univox UD-50 Uni-Drive
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, March 11, 1971, Southampton University, West Refectory, Garden Court, Southampton, England

Sola Sound Tonebender MK II

Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
General Specs
Features: Top Panel: Level, Attack, Footswitch Toggle - Back Panel: Input Jack, Output Jack
Years in use: ca. 1966-June 1969, August 1971, ca. 1998
Website:
The Sola Sound Tonebender MK II was first used when Jimmy Page switched over from the 1964 Epiphone Rivoli EB232 Bass in the Yardbirds on August 25, 1966.

In a December 1968 issue of the Hit Parader, Page briefly discussed his Tonebender.

Hit Parader: What's the unusual device you use on your guitar?
Page: It's called a Tone Bender. I had somebody custom make it for me and I get 75% of my sound with it. It's very similar to a fuzzbox, but I can sustain notes for several minutes if I want to. It just has an on and off switch and it also has a fuzzy sound. It's not manufactured at all. A friend of mine made it by hand for me. (Ed note: guitarists interested in buying the "Jimmy Page Tonebender" may write to Gary Hurst, Macaris Musical Exchange, 100 Charing Cross Rd., London, W.C.2, England. the price is around $35.00).

Page also used the Tonebender in Led Zeppelin up until June 1969, although, a one-off appearance was made on August 7, 1971 in Montreux, Switzerland. Listening to the audio recording from that night indicates a typical Page tone from that era, so it is unknown if the Tonebender was actually employed that evening.

The Tonebender was last used in 1998 in the guitar solo for the title track on Walking In Clarksdale, however it stopped working during these sessions.

A reissue Tonebender MK II was seen in a segment on 2008's It Might Get Loud.

Photos

Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
The Yardbirds, March 9, 1968, Bouton Rouge TV Programme, Maison de Radio-France, Paris, France
Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
Led Zeppelin, March 17, 1969, TV Byen, Gladsaxe, Denmark
Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
Led Zeppelin, August 8, 1971
Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
from It Might Get Loud, ca. 2008
Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
from It Might Get Loud, ca. 2008
Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
1968 Advertisement
Sola Sound Tonebender MK II
Receipt for Jimmy Page's Tonebender

Resources and Information:

http://www.stompboxes.co.uk/History.html

Rotosound Tonebender MKIII

Rotosound Tonebender MKIII
General Specs
Features: Top Panel: Volume, Treble, Fuzz, Footswitch Toggle - Back Panel: Instrument Jack, Amplifier Jack
Years in use: ca. June 1969
Website: http://www.rotosound.com/
The Rotosound Tonebender MK III differs from the Sola Sound Tonebender MK II because of its 3-transistor (2-BFY71 and 1-NKT214) design. The result is a more mellow fuzz tone.

The Rotosound Tonebender MK III was seen at Tous En Scene on June 19, 1969 and heard on BBC radio appearances (June 16, 1969, June 24, 1969 and June 27, 1969).

Photos

Rotosound Tonebender MKIII
Led Zeppelin, June 19, 1969, L'Antenne Culturelle du Kremlin Bicêtre, Paris, France
Rotosound Tonebender MKIII
Led Zeppelin, June 21, 1969, Colston Hall, Bristol, England

Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer

Roland TR-707
General Specs
Controls: Power On/Off Switch, Mode Selector, Rhythm Programming Modes, Play Modes, Compose Mode, Instrument/Track Selector, Tempo Control, Auto Fill In Selector, Voice Selectors, Step Buttons, Basic Variation Switch, I/F Variation Switch, Start/Stop Button, Tap Button, Master Volume
Output: Master Out Hi/Low, (8) Multi-Instrument Outs, (2) Pedal Switch Jacks, Sync In/Out, (3) Trigger Jacks
Years in use: 1981
Website: http://www.rolandus.com/
The TR-808 is a classic drum machine that used analog synthesis to create its sounds. The sounds have a very thin and pure quality and aren't grungy like it's successor the TR-909. In fact, the 808 has become the signature beatbox used in most R&B and hip-hop as well as a lot of dance and techno music. Booming bass kicks, crispy snares and that annoying cowbell sound made famous during the 80's are all part of the 808 and its famous sound.

Its 16 drum sounds include the famous boomy low kick, snappy snares, low/mid/hi toms, low/mid/hi congas, rimshot, claves, hand clap, maracas, cowbell, cymbal, open hihat, closed hihat and accent. All of the sounds can be edited and/or tuned and have individual outputs. Unfortunately it is not MIDI equipped but it does use Roland's DIN Sync.

The TR-808 was OK in its time. It just didn't sound like real drums. When the Linn Drum machines appeared, the 808 seemed doomed. But its unique sound and analog allure have found it a long-lasting home in many forms of music. Clearly the 808 has been one of the more important and famous drum machines in the history of music, spawning imitators (ReBirth, DrumStation) and band names (808 State).

Jimmy Page used a Roland G-505 Guitar Synthesizer Controller Guitar, G-808 Guitar, TR-808 Rhythm Composer and (2) GR-300 Guitar Synthesizers (connected via US-2 Unit Switcher) in composing the soundtrack to the 1982 movie Death Wish II.

Photos

Roland TR-808
Roland TR-808
Guitar Player, April 1982 Advertisement

Resources and Information:

http://www.vintagesynth.com/roland/808.php

Roland GR-700 Guitar Synthesizer

Roland GR-700
General Specs
Controls: (11) Pedals, Control Panel buttons
Input: 24-Pin Connector
Output: MIX/SYNTH Guitar
Years in use: 1984
Website: http://www.rolandus.com/
The GR-700 is classic Roland analog synthesizer technology. Released in late 1984, the GR-700 is the pinnacle of early Roland guitar synthesizer design. The distinctive and futuristic GR-700 features both a digital CPU for guitar tracking and a warm, fat hybrid digital/analog synthesizer engine for lush sounds. The GR-700 has a MIDI out port for controlling other MIDI modules, but the MIDI output is erratic and unreliable. In addition, no pitch bend information is sent via MIDI either.

Like the current generation of Roland guitar synths, the GR-700 controls the internal synth engine directly for faster response. But, make no mistake about it, the GR-700 is not a GR-300. Of all the products Roland has ever made, the GR-700 has the trickiest and most erratic tracking. The GR-700 is certainly better than equivalent products made by other manufactures at the time, but it is inferior to the GR-100, GR-300, GM-70 or the Ibanez MC-1.

For players who were used to the accuracy and speedy response of the GR-300, the GR-700 seemed like a real step backwards. Still, the GR-700 did introduce a new level of programability for guitar synthesizers. And when you consider the design and engineering costs of the Roland G-707 and GR-700, it is clear that Roland made a major commitment to guitar synthesizers.

Steve Rosen: But you have done a let of playing on the Roland guitar synthesizer? The Death Wish II soundtrack?

Jimmy Page: Yes. Given a situation, I've tried to get the most out of the Roland guitar synthesizer. Both versions but the second one [GR-700] was a better one. As far as it goes, I must admit that I went with Tim [Marten, guitar tech] to a demonstration of the SynthAxe and it was just absolutely terrifying. It was great, it was fantastic. I knew that the Roland didn't track properly but you can adapt to it in a way. But it's life and limb, really, to get one of those [SynthAxe]. I'd have to sell me Les Paul. It's just that it's so expensive and all that sort of stuff. But it's just like when synthesizers first came out, it was a fortune for nothing. It was just monophonic but you could have a polyphonic keyboard with whatever tone and triggering you were getting from that synthesizer for like ten percent of the price. So, do you see what I'm saying about the guitar synthesizer? I could see the difficulty in getting a string to trigger. It's difficult because they're touch-sensitive like a keyboard. That is always going to be the problem with guitar synthesizers. But as far as I can see, this SynthAxe is the best.

It's very interesting, actually; its neck is at a different angle. I haven't actually had a chance to play on it and get used to it. And of course, you have to get used to all the guitar synths, as such. I was so impressed with the demonstration of the SynthAxe that it's difficult to even see what faults it might have. You need to have one to know. And I'm not going to knock Roland. from March 18, 1986 Steve Rosen Interview

Photos

Roland GR-700
1984 Roland GR Brochure
Roland GR-700
1984 Roland GR Brochure
Roland GR-700
1984 Roland GR Brochure

Resources and Information:

http://www.joness.com/gr300/GR-700.htm

Roland GR-300 Guitar Synthesizer

Roland GR-300
1984 Magazine Advertisement
General Specs
Controls: Hexa VCO: Master Tuning, Pitch A (±1300 cent), Pitch B(±1300 cent), Pitch LATCH/UNLATCH Switch (2), Sweep Rise Time (0-6 sec), Sweep Fall Time (0-0 sec), LFO Rate (2-10 Hz), VCF: Preset A Attack Time (0-2 sec), MOD Sens, Preset B Attack Time (0-2 sec), MOD Sens, VCA: Compression Switch (Long Sustain), Footswitch: COMP (Envelope Compression), Pitch A (Pitch A/OFF Select), Pitch B (Pitch B/OFF Select), ENV MOD (VCF Envelope MOD). ENV INV (ENV MOD Invert) String Select: 1-6 Select Switch 6, String indicator 6 ,EXT Foot Control: String Select Switch, Sweep ON/OFF, VCF Pedal, Compression Switch
Input: 24-Pin Connector
Output: MIX/SYNTH Guitar
Years in use: 1981
Website: http://www.rolandus.com/
The GR-300 was considered the first "playable" guitar synthesizer. (It's predecessor, the GR-500, was plagued with tracking problems that rendered it virtually unplayable.) The GR-300 had no MIDI and could only be played through a GR-300 series guitar controller.

The actual synthesizer module sat on the floor and had the rugged appearance of a large guitar-type foot pedal (complete with carrying handles). It featured 6-voice polyphony, one voice per string and 2 oscillators per voice. Each pair of VCOs were harmonically locked to each string but could be tuned separately to play different pitches. The GR-300 also featured a VCF with variable lengthsweep up and down, and an LFO. Each string had an enable-disable switch as well as a string sensitivity switch (basically audio compression). Built-in footswitches controlled the VCO mode (single/dual), the VCO harmonize pitch (detuning of the VCO's), and the VCF mode (on, bypass, or inverted). There was also a pedal control input for the VCF. The GR-300 could output either the guitar, the synth, or a mix of the two.

Jimmy Page used a Roland G-505 Guitar Synthesizer Controller Guitar, G-808 Guitar, TR-808 Rhythm Composer and (2) GR-300 Guitar Synthesizers (connected via US-2 Unit Switcher) in composing the soundtrack to the 1982 movie Death Wish II.

Photos

Roland GR-300
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland GR-300
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland GR-300
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland G-707
Roland GR-300
Roland G-707
Roland GR-300
Roland G-707
Guitar Player, April 1982 Advertisement

Roger Mayer Voodoo Vibe

Roger Mayer Voodoo Vibe
General Specs
Front Panel Features: Function (Chorus, Vibrato, Tremolo), Speed Range (Classic, Pulse), Speed, Symmetry, Bias, Intensity, Output
Rear Jack Panel Sockets: Input Jack, HW Out, Buffered Out, To/From, DC Power Jack, Internal Batter, LED Indicator
Years in use: 1998-2006
Website: http://www.roger-mayer.co.uk/
The Voodoo Vibe is Roger Mayer's update of the Univibe. The Univibe was designed as a rotating speaker simulator for keyboards, but is best known for being used by Jimi Hendrix.

The Roger Mayer Voodoo Vibe was used in some tracks on Walking Into Clarksdale.

Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard

Cornish Effects Pedalboard
General Specs
Features: Pedalboard Input - Unity Gain

Emergency Automatic Mechanical Bypass to Output #1 in case of Power Failure

Send / Return to Spare FX #1 with Bypass Switch

Roger Meyer Voodoo Fuzz - Removed in January 1996 - Replaced by Amp Lead switch for 2 off Fender Tonemaster

MXR Phase 90 with Bypass Switch

Yamaha CH-10Mk II Chorus with Bypass Switch

Send / Return to Spare FX #2 with Bypass Switch

Boss CE-2 Chorus with Bypass Switch

Jen Cry-Baby Wah with Bypass Switch

Digitech WH-1 Whammy + Pete Cornish Linear Boost 0/+20dB with Bypass Switch

Send / Return to Echoplex EP-3 (modified by Pete Cornish) with Adjustable Gain and Bypass Switch

Linear Boost all Outputs 0/+20dB with Bypass Switch

Master Volume

Local and Remote Mute All Outputs

3 off Outputs to Amps - Output #4 added January 1995

115V Output to Echoplex
Serial Number: #257
Years in use: October 1993-Present
Website: http://www.petecornish.co.uk/
Jimmy Page began implementing a system to organize his effects pedals as early as 1977, with a simple piece of plywood, painted black, with the Vox 'Cry Baby' Wah and MXR M-101 Phase 90 attached to it. On stage, in The Firm/Outrider days, Page accumulated additional pedals.

In late 1993, Jimmy Page had Pete & Lynda Cornish create an effects pedalboard. Cornish had previously built a Tube Pre-Amp for Page in 1985.

After extensive testing and comparisons of various effects pedals and amplifiers by Jimmy and his technician we were asked to build an effects system that would operate with equal efficiency in every country in the world and incorporate all Jimmy's chosen effects and route the signal to several amplifiers.

Most of the effects had so called "true bypass" footswitches and we decided to investigate whether we could use this system with the entire collection of effects and amps as so many manufacturers offer the "true bypass" as the ultimate type of switching.


Our findings were that the "true bypass" did NOT create unified signal level or tone from the guitar for the following reason:

Take for instance a 5m guitar cable linked to six pedals, each linked by a 1m cable, and then on to the amp by say a 15m cable. If all pedals have "true bypass", and are off, then the total cable length hanging on the guitar output will be 25m. This will cause a huge loss of tone and signal level particularly if the guitar is a vintage type with low output. The amp volume is then turned up and the treble control increased to compensate for the losses. The inherent background noise now increases by the amount of the gain and treble increase and is usually, in my experience, too bad for serious work. If one of the pedals is now switched on, then it's high input impedance (and usually low output impedance) will buffer the output cables from the guitar; the signal level and treble content will rise due to the removal of some of the load on the pickups (i.e. 6m instead of 25m of cable). If that pedal was for example a chorus or delay, devices which are usually unity gain, then the overall signal level and tone will vary each time an effect is added...not a very good idea.

The "Pete Cornish System", which we devised in the early 70's, is to feed the guitar into a fixed high impedance load, which is identical to the amp input, and then distribute the signal to the various effects and amps by low impedance buffered feeds. This gives a constant signal level and tonal characteristics from the guitar, which do not change at all when effects are added. The proof that this works are in the recordings of our clients: Roxy Music; The Police; Queen; Pink Floyd; Bryan Adams; Lou Reed; Dire Straits; Paul McCartney; Sting; Judas Priest; Black Sabbath....

For Jimmy's stage system, we fitted additional high impedance pre-amps between each effect to further isolate each one from the next in line. We also provided two send/return circuits so that new effects could be added at a later date and another send/return to Jimmy's Echoplex. The four isolated outputs to the stage amplifiers each had a line driver fitted to overcome the very long across-stage cables (total length 64m).

To ensure that the sound of the guitar and effects would remain constant at each venue across the world we designed "super regulated" dc power supplies to suit both the effects and the audio frequency pre-amps. Each effect and pre-amp had it's own isolated dc feed which we know helps to prevent cross-leakage of effect signals: for example upper harmonic distortion products can leak into clean chorus circuits through a common power supply if this precaution is not taken.

Jimmy was very pleased with his "Pete Cornish Guitar/Effects/Amps System" and it has proved most reliable and convenient to set up, as all the effects and routing are permanently in the correct order and it is so simple to "just plug in and play..."

Updates
1995 - Guitar Selector/Line Driver
1998 - AC Distribution Unit
2002 - AC Power Wah
2007 - 4 Channel Amp routing Loom/Junction Box
2007 - Remote Mute/Echoplex Routing Loom

Photos

Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard
Jimmy Page, ca. 2008, It Might Get Loud, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios, Burbank, California
Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard
Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard

MXR M-103 Blue Box Octave Fuzz Distortion Pedal

MXR M-103 Blue Box Octave Fuzz Distortion Pedal
General Specs
Features: Output Knob, Blend Knob, Footswitch Toggle, Output Jack, Input Jack
Power: (1) 9V Battery
Years in use: ca. Nov.-Dec. 1978
Website: http://www.jimdunlop.com/
The MXR M-103 Blue Box Octave Fuzz Distortion Pedal was used in-studio to provide the bass octaving in Fool In The Rain.

The use of the MXR Blue Box is quite simple. The Output knob sets the total output gain and the Blend knob adjusts ratio of dry (clean) with wet (effects) signal.

MXR M-101 Phase 90

MXR M-101 Phase 90
General Specs
Features: Speed Knob, Footswitch Toggle, Output Jack, Input Jack
Power: (1) 9V Battery
Years in use: ca. 1975-Present
Website: http://www.jimdunlop.com/
The MXR M-101 Phase 90 Phaser Pedal was used in the studio on Achilles Last Stand and Wanton Song and was used on stage for Achilles Last Stand, Kashmir, Nobody's Fault But Mine, Sick Again and Wanton Song from 1975 through the end of Led Zeppelin.

The pedal was eventually incorporated into the Pete Cornish Pedalboard in 1993.

The speed knob varies rate of phase sweep.

Photos:

MXR M-101 Phase 90
Led Zeppelin, January 21, 1975, Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois
MXR M-101 Phase 90
Jimmy Page, Stairway To Heaven, April 06, 1977, Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois
MXR M-101 Phase 90
Jimmy Page, Kashmir, June 21, 1980, Ahoy Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone

Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone
General Specs
Features: Rear Panel: Volume, Attack, Amplifier Jack - Right Panel: Input Jack - Top Panel: On/Off Button
Power: (2) AA Batteries
Years in use: ca. 1964-1966
The Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone pedal was used by Keith Richards to record (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction in 1965. It was first released in 1962 and reissued twice, in 1966 as the FZ-1A and in the early 1970s as the FZ-1B.

Jimmy Page used the FZ-1 in studio sessions from 1964 to 1966.

Roger Mayer confirmed in an October 2012 interview that he did not perform any modification to Jimmy Page's FZ-1 pedal.

Maestro Echoplex EP-3

Maestro Echoplex EP-3
Maestro Echoplex EP-3, J'ma el FNA Square,
Marrakech, Morocco, August 10, 1994
General Specs
Features: Echo/Sound On Sound, Echo Sustain, Record Level Attenuator, Echo Volume, Input Jack, Output Jack, Echo/Off Foot Switch Jack, Recording Light, Playback Foot Switch Jack, Tape Delay Slider
Tape Carts used: Fulltone ETC-1
Years in use: ca. June 1972-ca. 2008
Website:
The Maestro Echoplex was one of the earliest, and neatest effects generators there will ever be. A long tape cassette runs in a loop over recording and play-back heads. The space you set between these points determines the length of the delay time.

The Maestro Echoplex EP-3 was Jimmy Page's most well known echo machine. He had used it starting on the 1972 US Tour in June, having replaced the Maestro Echoplex EP-2. Page used one EP-3 with the Sonic Wave Theremin, one to two on the 1995 & 1998 Page/Plant tours and in the movie It Might Get Loud in the Kashmir studio scene.

Photos:

Maestro Echoplex EP-3
Jimmy Page, June 25, 1972, The Forum, Inglewood, California
Maestro Echoplex EP-3
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love, February 08, 1975, The Spectrum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Maestro Echoplex EP-3
Leaving the stage, June 20, 1980, Vorst Nationaal, Brussels, Belgium
Maestro Echoplex EP-3
Maestro Echoplex EP-3, August 10, 1994, J'ma el FNA Square, Marrakech, Morocco

Resources and Information:

http://www.regiscoyne.com/echoplex/

Maestro Echoplex EP-2

Maestro Echoplex EP-2
General Specs
Features: Playback Foot Switch Jack, On/Off Foot Switch Jack, Echo Repeat Knob, Volume Knob, (2) Input Jacks, Tape Delay Slider
Tape Carts used: Fulltone ETC-1
Years in use: ca. January 1970-February 1972
The Maestro Echoplex was one of the earliest, and neatest effects generators there will ever be. A long tape cassette runs in a loop over recording and play-back heads. The space you set between these points determines the length of the delay time.

Jimmy Page replaced the Vox CO2 Deluxe Echo 'Long Tom' with the Maestro Echoplex EP-2 in early 1970. It was seen at the Royal Albert Hall gig on January 9, 1970 and other performances on stage until it was replaced by the Maestro Echoplex EP-3.

Photos

Maestro Echoplex EP-2
Led Zeppelin, March 31, 1970, The Spectrum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Maestro Echoplex EP-2
Jimmy Page, March 11, 1971, University of Southampton, Southampton, England
Maestro Echoplex EP-2
Jimmy Page, February 20, 1972, Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia
Maestro Echoplex EP-2
Magazine Advertisement

Resources and Information:

http://www.regiscoyne.com/echoplex/

Led Zeppelin-era Pedalboard

Led Zeppelin-era Pedalboard
Jimmy Page, April 10, 1977, Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois
General Specs
Features: Plywood, painted black, with theVox 'Cry Baby' Wah on the left and the MXR M-101 Phase 90 Phaser Pedal on the right. Both were secured to the plywood with black gaffers' tape.
Years in use: 1977-1980
Used on-stage the 1977 US Tour until Led Zeppelin's last tour date on July 7, 1980 in Berlin, Germany.

Photos:

Led Zeppelin-era Pedalboard
Robert Plant, ca. 1977
Led Zeppelin-era Pedalboard
Led Zeppelin, ca. July 1979
Led Zeppelin-era Pedalboard
Robert Plant, June 24, 1980, Hannover Messehalle, Hannover, Germany

Gizmotron

Gizmotron
General Specs
Features: (6) Keys for individual usage, AC Power Jack, On/Off Switch
Years in use: 1978
The Gizmotron was a hexaphonic mechanical string bowing device invented by Lol Creme and Kevin Godley of 10CC. It never took off and was some kind of financial disaster. It has been described by Jimmy as a "hurdy gurdy type of thing". It existed in two versions: 6-key version for guitar and a 4-key version for bass. The Gizmotron works by having a rubber wheel for each string and a key for each wheel, such that pressing down on the key engages the wheel with a rotating shaft and the guitar string. The shaft rotates the wheel which then excites the string.

Jimmy may have used the Gizmotron on Carouselambra and In The Evening to produce the drone sound.

Photos

Gizmotron
 
Gizmotron
 
Gizmotron
 
Gizmotron
 
Gizmotron
 
 

Firm-era Pedal Board

Firm-era Pedal Board
General Specs
Features: On/Off Switches for Eventide H949 Harmonizer, Maestro Echoplex EP-3, Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive and Boss CE-2 Chorus. Holes are cut out on the top for the individual controls for the Boss Pedals - Rear Panel:Echoplex Input, Harmonizer Input, Main Output
Years in use: 1984-1988
Used on-stage during The Firm years.

Eventide H949 Harmonizer

Eventide H949 Harmonizer
General Specs
Features: Front Panel: Input Level, Repeat button, Main Level, Delay Only Level, Low EQ, High EQ, Pitch Ratio Display, Manual, Control Mode buttons (Manual, Keyboard, CV + Main), Line button, Delay Only Output buttons (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200 M/Sec), Function Select button, Algorithm Select button, Main Output button (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200 M/Sec), Power Switch (On/Off) - Rear PanelPower Jack, (2) Slo-Blo Fuse (750MA-115 VAC, 500MA-230 VAC), IEEE-488 Port, KYBD Port, Delay Only Output (XLR), Main Output (XLR), Input (XLR)
Years in use: ca. 1984-??
Website: http://www.eventide.com/
Used on-stage during The Firm years for the Bow Solo.

Photos:

Eventide H949 Harmonizer
ca. 1985

Eventide H910 Harmonizer

Eventide H910 Harmonizer
General Specs
Features: Front Panel: Input Level, Feedback, Manual Delay, Anti-Feedback, Line, Digital Delay, Output Delay, Pitch Control - Rear Panel: (2) Output Terminal sets
Retail Price: $1500 USD
Years in use: 1976-1982
Website: http://www.eventide.com/
Used on-stage, with the keyboard controller, for Jimmy's Noise Solo in 1977-79, also used in 1976 in recording Bonzo's Montreux on high feedback setting.

It featured 16-bit digital processing and a 400ms delay time with 15kHz bandwidth delay, pitch-shift, time-reversal, time-compression, flanging, chorus.

Photos:

Eventide H910 Harmonizer
Led Zeppelin, ca. November 1976, Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England
Eventide H910 Harmonizer Eventide H910 Harmonizer
Eventide Keyboard Controller
Eventide Keyboard Controller

Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal

Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal
General Specs
Controls: Level, Tone, Drive
Connectors: Input, Output, AC Adaptor
Dimensions: 8” (L) x 6.3” (W) x 2.5” (H)
Weight: 3.5 lbs
Nominal Input Level: +8.8 dBu
Nominal Output Level: +8.8
Years in use: 1993-Present
Website: http://www.digitech.com/products/
Pedals/Whammy.php
The WH-1 Whammy pedal, the original whammy, first engineered and manufactured in 1989 by IVL Technologies and discontinued in 1993. Jimmy Page has (2) of the Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal in the Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard.

GW: What tuning did you use for the slide guitar parts on 'Waiting On You'?
Page: That's not a slide guitar.
GW: What?
Page: (laughs) You've got the right idea, but I'm not playing slide - it's the Whammy Pedal again! I wanted to play a slide part, but I didn't want to be restricted to an open tuning. So I used the Whammy to imitate a slide. It's a lovely unit, that Whammy Pedal. The basics on that track were played on a Strat-type Jackson, then I doubled the "slide" parts with the 12-string half of my Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck. - Guitar World, May 1993

It was also used on the second solo of Walking Into Clarksale with the 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'Number One' and in a September 1998 Guitar Shop magazine interview Jimmy Page said that it was used on House Of Love from Walking Into Clarksdale.

Photos:

Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal
Jimmy Page, Black Dog,
January 25, 1995, Depot Studios,
London, England
Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal
Jimmy Page, It Might
Get Loud
Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal
Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal

DeArmond 610 Tone & Volume Pedal

DeArmond 610 Tone & Volume Pedal
General Specs
Features: 1/4" Input Jack (INST.), 1/4" Output Jack (SPKR.)
Years in use: 1964-????
Website: http://www.dearmond
guitars.com/
Jimmy Page used the DeArmond 610 Tone & Volume Pedal in sessionwork in the early 1960s. He most likely started using the DeArmond 610 because fellow session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan was using one (although borrowed from Vic Flick), most notably on Dave Berry's The Crying Game. Page can be heard using the DeArmond 610 on Brenda Lee's Is It True?.

The DeArmond 610 is relatively unique, as it moves in three dimensions: up/down for the regular volume effect, but it also swivels left/right for the 'tone' effect. The Tone effect is basically somewhere between turning a tone knob on a guitar with your hand and a wah-wah. It is a passive effect, no batteries required, so it doesn't boost any frequencies like a wah does, but it does have a wider range and sounds a bit different than a tone knob.

Photos:

DeArmond 610 Tone & Volume Pedal
DeArmond 610 Tone & Volume Pedal

Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive

Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive
General Specs
Controls: Level, Tone, Drive
Connectors: Input, Output, AC Adaptor
Current Draw: 4 mA (DC 9V) (Advertisement says 4mA, the manual says 6 mA, measurements confirmed current draw to be 3.7 mA)
Weight: 400g / 15 oz (including battery)
Nominal Input Level: -20 dBu
Input Impedance: 470k Ohm/1M Ohm (Earlier Pocket Dictionary's says 470k, later manuals says 1 MOhm)
Nominal Output Level: -20 dBu
Output Impedance: 1k Ohm
Residual Noise Level: -110 dBm (IHF-A Weighted, Typ.)
Recommended Load Impedance: 10k Ohn or greater
Recommended AC Adaptor: ACA Series
Years in use: ca. November 1984-Present
Website: http://www.bossus.com/
The Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive pedal was used in The Firm/Outrider days.

Boss CE-2 Chorus

Boss CE-2 Chorus
General Specs
Controls: Rate, Depth
Connectors: Input, Output, AC Adaptor
Current Draw: 9 mA (DC 9V)
Weight: 400 g. (14 oz)
Input Impedance: 470k Ohm
Signal/Noise Ratio: 90dB or more
Recommended Load Impedance: 10k Ohn or greater
Recommended AC Adaptor: ACA Series
Years in use: ca. November 1984-Present
Website: http://www.bossus.com/
The Boss CE-2 Chorus pedal was used in The Firm/Outrider days. It was later incorporated into the Pete Cornish Effects Pedalboard.

Binson Echorec B2

Binson Ecrorec B2
General Specs
Features: Front Panel: Echo Volume, Length Of Swell, Regeneration, 12-position head selector, (3) Channel Selector, Level Indicator - Right Side Panel: (3) Input Jacks, (3) Output Jacks - Left Side Panel: Footswitch Jack, Echo Output Jack
Years in use: ca. June 1970
Website: http://www.binson.com/
Seen on-stage in ca. June 1970.

Photos:

Binson Echorec B2
Jimmy Page, June 22, 1970, Laugardalshöll Sports Arena, Reykjavik, Iceland

Binson Echorec 2

Binson Ecrorec 2
General Specs
Features: Front Panel: Input Control, Length Of Swell, Echo Volume, Echo Tone, Reverb/Repeat, 12-position head selector, (3) Channel Selector, Level Indicator - Right Side Panel: (3) Input Jacks, (3) Output Jacks - Left Side Panel: Footswitch Jack, Echo Output Jack
Tubes: 6 x 12AX7
Years in use: ca. May 1971
Website: http://www.binson.com/
Produced in Milan, Italy, the Binsons had its peak in the 1960s. They were unique in their construction, utilizing a specially designed steel/alloy disc or drum, which carried a durable flat metal 'tape'. The drum was driven by a powerful AC motor, in most cases, via a rubber jockey wheel, which kept the transport very stable. Record and playback heads were arranged around the drum periphery. The Echorec 2 was manufactured by Binson between 1961 and 1979.

Seen on-stage in ca. May 1971.

Engineer Andy Johns said that the Echorec 2 was used in recording the drum sound on When The Levee Breaks.

Another thing we used was the old Binson Echorec. Listen to "When the Levee Breaks". That was me putting two (Beyer) M160's on the second floor with no other microphones at all because I wanted to get John Bonham the way he actually sounded, and it worked. Page would say that he made me do it but he was down at the pub, but he did bring me his Binson Echorec for the track. - Andy Johns

Photos:

Binson Echorec 2
Jimmy Page, May 03, 1971, KB Hallen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Binson Echorec 2

Resources and Information:

http://www.gilmourish.com/?page_id=74
Owsinski, Bobby. The Mixing Engineer's Handbook - Second Edition. Boston: Thomson Course Technology, 2006.

Wizard Amplifiers

Wizard
General Specs
Years in use: 1999
Website: http://www.wizardamplification.com/
Jimmy Page used the Wizard Amplifiers for the Custom Theremin in 1999-2000 on stage with The Black Crowes.

Photos:

Wizard Amplifiers
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love, October 9, 1999, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey
Wizard Amplifiers
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love, October 9, 1999, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey
Wizard Amplifiers
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love, October 18, 1999, Greek Theatre, Los Angeles, California

WEM Ultimus Bass Amplifier

WEM Ultimus Bass Amplifier
WEM Ultimus Bass Amplifier, March 25, 1969, Staines Lino Factory, Staines, England
General Specs
Watts:
Features:
Dimensions:
Tubes:
Years in use: March 25, 1969
Website: http://www.wemwatkins.co.uk/

WEM Cabinets

WEM Cabinets
Led Zeppelin, September 05, 1970, International Center Arena, Honolulu, Hawaii
General Specs
Watts:  
Speakers: (2) 15" Full range
Dimensions: 23"W x 35"H x 12"D
Inputs:  
Years in use: ca. August-September 1970
Website: http://www.wemwatkins.co.uk/
For the August/September tour of the US in 1970, Page used his previous setup of his two Hiwatts running into four Marshall cabinets. However, for that tour he also added two WEM cabinets, which he placed the two Hiwatt heads on top of, and ran alongside his Marshall 4x12s: It's entirely possible that Page acquired the WEM cabinets by way of the PA system used for the European tour the month before. Notice the WEM PA setup in this pic from Essen, July 1970: Because the two cabinets are the exact same dimensions, again it's not known which one Page used. However, I have yet to see a photo from the era where the placard that was present on the Dual 12 is visible. So, it's probably a good guess that Page used the Twin 15.

any case, this setup was unique for the simple reason that for the 1970 Aug/Sep US tour, Page was running 6 separate cabinets from only two heads, as opposed to the 2 heads/4 cabinets setup he ran before. Anyone who is familiar with how guitar amps work would know that the more speakers one runs off of one amp, the less power each individual speaker gets. Which perhaps makes for little surprise that Page's sound on that 1970 US tour was considerably "cleaner" in tone. Because not only was each amp powering two 4x12 cabinets, but each were likely also powering their own 2x15 cabinet. My guess is that the two WEM cabinets were specifically used for the theremin, but that isn't clear. In any case, given that Page only had the two Hiwatts onstage, it's likely that he was splitting at least one of them to the WEM cabs for the theremin. Although he may as well have been splitting each Hiwatt to their own set of 4x12s and WEM cab, with one of the heads receiving a separate signal from the theremin in addition to his guitar signal.

Jimmy Page used (2) of these cabinets with Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page' Amplifiers to power the Sonic Wave Theremin.

Portions authored by blackmikito

Photos

WEM Cabinets
Stage setup, August 15, 1970, Yale Bowl, New Haven, Connecticut
WEM Cabinets
Led Zeppelin, Thank You, September 04, 1970, The Forum, Inglewood, California

VOX UL-4120 Amplifier

VOX UL-4120 Amplifier
General Specs
Watts: 120
Features: Front Panel: (2) Input Jacks, Top Boost Switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, (2) Input Jacks, Top Boost Switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass - Rear Panel: On/Off Switch, Footpedal Jack, (2) Fuses, Ohm Impedance Switch, (4) Output Jacks, Power Cord
Dimensions: 24"W x 10"H x 11-1/4"D
Tubes: Power: 4 x KT88 - Pre-amp: 2 x 6GW8, 1 x 6BQ5
Years in use: ca. April 1968-June 1969
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
The VOX UL-4120 Amplifier was used on stage by Jimmy Page from ca. 1968 (with The Yardbirds) until the end of the 2nd US Tour in May 1969 with Led Zeppelin. It was also seen in use at Morgan Sound Studios, in Willisden, North West London, England in June 1969 on unknown tracks.

The VOX UL-4120 Amplifier is the same as the UL-7120 except it lacks reverb and vibrato controls.

Photos

VOX UL-4120 Amplifier
Jimmy Page, ca. April 1968, Thee Image Club, Miami Beach, Florida
VOX UL-4120 Amplifier
Jimmy Page, ca. February 1969, Thee Image Club, Miami Beach, Florida
VOX UL-4120 Amplifier
Jimmy Page, May 02, 1969, Rose Palace, Pasadena, California
VOX UL-4120 Amplifier
VOX UL-4120 Amplifier (far left), ca. June 1969, Morgan Sound Studios, Willesden, London, England

Resources and Information:

http://wholelottaled.webs.com/amps.htm

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 'Super Beatle' Amplifier

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 'super Beatle' Amplifier
General Specs
Watts: 120
Features: Top Panel: Normal Channel - Volume, Bass, Treble, (2) Input Jacks, Top Boost Switch, Brilliant Channel - Volume, Bass, Treble, (2) Input Jacks, Middle Boost Switch, Bass Channel - Volume, Tone-X, (2) Input Jacks, Standby/Off SwitchRear Panel: Tremolo Speed, Tremolo Depth, Foot Pedal Jack, MRB Effects, Reverb Channel, Reverb Blend, Line Reverse Switch, AC Input, Fuse
Dimensions: 17"W x 9"H x 10-1/2"D, 45 lbs
Tubes: Solid state
Years in use: ca. June 1991
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/
The VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 'Super Beatle' Amplifier was used during the Coverdale-Page EMI CD recording sessions in Vancouver, June 1991. The owner learned Jimmy Page was in Vancouver and that he wanted a high powered VOX amplifier for the Coverdale Page sessions at the legendary Little Mountain Sound Studios. The owner being a musician, studio owner, and huge Led Zeppelin/Jimmy Page fan himself, contacted Jimmy's technician (JS), at Little Mountain and offered the amp to Jimmy over the weekend. The following Monday, Jimmy's tech called and said that Jimmy absolutely loved the amp, and was interested in buying or renting it for the session. The owner said he wanted to keep the amp but offered to lend it to Jimmy for the duration of the recording. After three months, Jimmy's tech called and said they were finished with the amp, and that he could come down to pick it up. The Tech said the amp had been used extensively on the record, on about half the songs.

Manufactured under license from JMI (VOX) England, by Thomas Organ Co. in California ca. 1966.

Photos

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 ‘Super Beatle’ Amplifier

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 ‘Super Beatle’ Amplifier

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 ‘Super Beatle’ Amplifier

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 ‘Super Beatle’ Amplifier

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 ‘Super Beatle’ Amplifier

VOX U.S. Thomas Organ V1141 ‘Super Beatle’ Amplifier

VOX AC-100 MK II

VOX AC-100 MK II
VOX AC-100 Amplifier, Jimmy Page and The Yardbirds, ca. 1967.
VOX AC-100 MK II
Vox AC-100 Cabinet, Egegård Skole, Gladsaxe, Denmark, September 7, 1968, Photo by Jørgen Angel
General Specs
Watts: 100
Speakers: (4) 12" VOX Celestion Alnico 15-Watt Speakers, 2 Midax H950 Mid-range horns
Features: (2) Input Jacks, Volume, Treble, Bass, On/Off Switch, Fuse, Voltage Selector
Dimensions: Amplifier: 19"W x 7"H x 11-1/4"D, 55 lbsSpeaker Cabinet: 27-1/4"W x 40"H x 11-1/2"D, 70 lbs.
Inputs: (1) XLR Speaker Jack
Tubes: Power: 4 x 6CA7, Pre-amp: 1 x 12AU7, 1 x 12AX7
Years in use: ca. 1967-1968
Website: http://www.voxamps.com/

VOX AC-30/6 Combo Amplifier

VOX AC-30/6 Combo Amplifier
General Specs
Watts: 30
Features: Top Panel: (6) Input Jacks (Vib-Trem, Normal Brilliant), Vib-Trem Speed, Vib-Trem On/Off, Vib-Trem VOlume, Normal Volume, Brilliant Volume, Tone, On/Off Switch, Fuse, Voltage Selector - Rear Panel: (4) Output Jacks
Speakers: (2) 8" Celection G12
Dimensions: 27-1/4"W x 20-1/2"H x 10-1/2"D, 70 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 4 x 6BQ5, Pre-amp: 4 x 12AX7, 1 x 12AU7, Rectifier: 1 x GZ34
Years in use: ca. 1967-1998
Website: http://www.VOXshowroom.com/
Jimmy Page used the VOX AC30/6 Combo Amplifier in the studio with the Yardbirds.

From a July 1977 Steve Rosen Interview
(I used VOX) AC-30 (amps). They've held up consistently well. .....You could get these one's with special treble boosters on the back which is what I had.

Page has also said that he has used the AC30 amps during Led Zeppelin, although it is unknown when. In a July 1986 Guitar World interview, engineer Eddie Kramer said that he believed that Page used a VOX AC30 amp for the Houses Of The Holy sessions at Stargroves in May 1972.

He also brought out (2) AC30/6 Combo Amplifiers for both the 1995 and 1998 Page/Plant tours and in the studio for the tremolo section of When The World Was Young from Walking Into Clarksdale.

Photos

VOX AC30/6 Combo Amplifier
Jimmy Page, ca. 1995
VOX AC30/6 Combo Amplifier
Jimmy Page, Most High, August 23, 1998, Bizarre Festival, Köln, Germany
VOX AC30/6 Combo Amplifier
Walking offstage, December 3, 1998, Festhalle, Frankfurt, Germany

Univox UX1516 Cabinet

Univox UX1516 Cabinet
Univox UX1516 Cabinet, June 22, 1972, Swing Auditorium,
San Bernadino, California
General Specs
Watts: 150
Speakers: (6) 12" Celestions
Dimensions:
Inputs: 2
Years in use: June 14-28, 1972
Website: http://www.univox.org/
Jimmy Page used the Univox UX-1516 Cabinet, along with the Univox UX-1501 Amplifier for a brief period of only 14 days in June 1972 on the US tour. The Univox UX1500 Lead System was on the right side of his backline, so they were most likely being used with the Sonic Wave Theremin.

Photos

Vox UL-4120 Amplifier
Jimmy Page, June 14, 1972, Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Uniondale, New York
Vox UL-4120 Amplifier
Robert Plant, June 22, 1972, Swing Auditorium, San Bernadino, California
Vox UL-4120 Amplifier
Robert Plant, June 25, 1972, The Forum, Inglewood, California

Univox UX-1501 Amplifier

Univox UX-1501 Amplifier
General Specs
Watts: 140
Features: Front Panel: (2) Guitar Input Jacks, (2) Bass Input Jacks, (2) Mixer Input Jacks, (2) Volume, Master Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, On/Off Switch, (2) Standby Switch, Hi-Boost Switch - Rear Panel: (4) Output Jacks, Ohm Impedance Switch
Tubes: Power: 4 x 6550, Pre-amp: 2 x 12AU7, 2 x 12AX7
Years in use: June 14-28, 1972
Website: http://www.univox.org/
Jimmy Page used the Univox UX-1501 Amplifier, along with the Univox UX-1516 Cabinet for a brief period of only 14 days in June 1972 on the US tour. The Univox UX1500 Lead System was on the right side of his backline, so they were most likely being used with the Sonic Wave Theremin.

Photos

Univox UX-1501 Amplifier
Jimmy Page, June 14, 1972, Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Uniondale, New York
Univox UX-1501 Amplifier
Robert Plant, June 22, 1972, Swing Auditorium, San Bernadino, California

Silvertone 1471 Combo Amplifier

Silvertone 1471
General Specs
Controls: Volume, Tone
Inputs: (2) 1/4" Jacks
Watts: 5
Speaker: 8"
According to a 1998 Guitar Shop interview, Jimmy Page said that...a Silvertone made it to the Clarksdale mix, but mostly as secondary spice for the Tonemaster..

Selmer Treble N' Base Mk III Amplifier

Selmer Treble N' Base Mk III Amplifier
Selmer Treble N' Base Mk III Amplifier, You Shook Me, March 27, 1969, Bremen/ARD Studios, Bremen, Germany
General Specs
Watts: 50
Features: Front Panel: (2) Input Jacks, Volume, Treble, Bass, (2) Input Jacks, Volume, Treble, Bass, Mute button, On/Off Switch - Rear Panel: (2) Output Jacks, Foot Pedal Jack, Voltage Switch, (2) Fuses, Ohm Impedance Switch
Dimensions:
Tubes: 4 x 6L6
Years in use: March 27, 1969
Website: http://www.vintagehofner.co.uk/
gallery/gallery3/selm.html

Photos

Selmer
Led Zeppelin, You Shook Me, March 27, 1969, Bremen/ARD Studios, Bremen, Germany

Selmer Goliath Cabinet

Selmer Goliath Cabinet
Selmer Goliath Cabinet, You Shook Me, March 27, 1969, Bremen/ARD Studios, Bremen, Germany
General Specs
Watts: 100
Speakers: (1) 12" & (1) 18"
Dimensions: 21.5"W x 39"H x 13"D
Inputs: 2
Years in use: March 27, 1969
Website: http://www.vintagehofner.co.uk/
gallery/gallery3/selm.html

Photos

Selmer
Led Zeppelin, You Shook Me, March 27, 1969, Bremen/ARD Studios, Bremen, Germany

Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier

Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Thank You, The Depot Studios, London,
England, January 25, 1995
General Specs
Watts: 100
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Presence, Treble, Mids, Bass, Volume, Gain (2) Input Jacks - Rear Panel:Wattage Switch, (2) Output Jacks, Ohm Impedance Switch, AC Jack
Dimensions: 27-5/8"W x 11-3/4"H x 8-3/4" D, 44 lbs
Tubes: 4 x 6L6
Years in use: Jan. 1995 - Dec. 2007
Website: http://www.tonehunter.de/
eng_index.php
The Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier have been used on stage since 1995 (American Music Awards) up to the 2007 Reunion Concert. These amplifiers were branded as Spetel, Petersburg or later Red Bear (Gibson).

Petersburg and Novik amps were designed and brandnames by Ralf Reichen. A man called Sergei Poljakov was contracted to build (some/all?) Petersburg amps and apparently he also built the Spetel amps but it is unknown who contracted him to build them.

Photos

Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, 2nd from left
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, 2nd from left
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Page & Plant, ca. 1995
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier
Petersburg P-100/JP-100 Amplifier

Resources and Information:

http://www.ringomedia.net/spetel.html

Orange OR412 Cabinet

Orange 4x12 Cabinet
Stage setup, February 20, 1972, Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia
General Specs
Watts: 120
Speakers: Eminence 'Greenback' G12H30
Dimensions: 30-1/2"W x 29"H x 15"D, 93 lbs.
Inputs: 2
Years in use: August 7, 1971 - July 07, 1980
Website: http://www.orangeamps.com/
Orange 4x12 Cabinets were used by Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones from August 7, 1971 through July 29, 1973 for keyboards and Theremin. Beginning on the 1975 US Tour, (2) cabinet were sprayed black and used by Jimmy Page for Theremin duties, through the end of Led Zeppelin on July 07, 1980.

Photos

Orange 4x12 Cabinet
Led Zeppelin, Black Dog, August 7, 1971, Montreux Casino Hall, Montreux, Switzerland
Orange 4x12 Cabinet
Jimmy Page, July 17, 1973, Seattle Center Coliseum, Seattle, Washington
Orange 4x12 Cabinet
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love, ca. 1975

Orange OR50 Amplifier

Orange OR50 Amplifier
Orange OR50 Amplifier, NAMM 2008, ca. January 2008, Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, California
General Specs
Watts: Class A/B 50W (RMS), Class A 30W (RMS)
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, HF Drive, Gain, Input Jack
Rear Panel: Wattage Rocker Switch (50W/30W), (2) 8-Ohm & (1) 16-Ohm Output Jacks, (2) HT Fuses, Power Jack
Dimensions: 21-3/4"W x 10"H x 9-1/2"D, 55 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 2 X EL34, Pre-amp: 2 x 12AX7
Years in use: Nov. - Dec. 2007
Website: http://www.orangeamps.com/
At NAMM 2008, Orange Amplifier designer Adrian Emsley revealed the new 40th Anniversary Series of the OR50 model. He also said that a limited quantity of (40) were being hand-built with different circuits and each given a different name of a woman and that Jimmy Page was given #1.

The front faceplate on Jimmy Page's amp has also been customized from the other (39) OR50 amplifiers.

Photos

Orange OR50 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Far right, on bottom
Orange OR50 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Far right, on bottom

Orange OR200 Amplifier

Orange OR200 Amplifier
Orange OR200 Amplifier, Kooyong Stadium Kooyong,
Melbourne, Australia, February 20, 1972
General Specs
Watts: 200
Features: Front Panel: (2) Inputs, Depth, Drive, Bass, Treble, Boost, Volume, On/Off Switch - Rear Panel: (2) Output Jacks, Ohm Selector, Slave Output Jack, (2) Fuses, Voltage Impedance Switch, AC Outlet
Dimensions: 21-1/2"W x 11"H x 16"D, 70 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 2 x 12AU7, 4 x KT88, Pre-amp: 2 x 12AX7
Years in use: August 7, 1971 - July 29, 1973
Website: http://www.orangeamps.com/
The Orange Amplification Company put out a press release in ca. August 1971 that Jimmy Page was proud to endorse Orange amplifiers and would feature them in the next Led Zeppelin tour. Page began using them on August 7, 1971, in Montreux, Switzerland. John Paul Jones also used (1) Orange OR200 Amplifier for keyboard duties on random dates in the 1971 US Tour.

Page had used them for the Sonic Wave Theremin.

On May 21, 2009, a sole bidder on eBay purchased one of the Orange OR200 Amplifiers, Serial #OR264, for $30,000. The amp had been sitting in a shed for years before it was found and had looked like a rat had made a nest in it. The person that found it had contacted Cliff Cooper at Orange Amplification Company in London, England who confirmed that it had belonged to Jimmy Page. It originally had been a slave unit and was modded to a main unit. He had kept the amp for about a year before selling it. The amp was sold on eBay by the Rutherford Music Exchange in Rutherford, NJ to an undisclosed buyer.

Photos

Orange OR200 Amplifier
Led Zeppelin, Black Dog, August 7, 1971, Montreux Casino Hall, Montreux, Switzerland
Orange OR200 Amplifier
Soundcheck, February 20, 1972, Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
Orange OR200 Amplifier
 
   

Orange AD50 Amplifier

Orange AD50 Amplifier
Orange AD50 Amp, on top of Orange OR50 Amp with ENGL 4x12 Pro Slanted Cabinet, December 10, 2007, 02 Arena, London, England
General Specs
Watts: Class A/B 50W (RMS), Class A 30W (RMS)
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Master Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, Gain, (2) Input Jacks (Hi & Lo) - Rear Panel: (3) Output Jacks, Foot Switch Jack, (2) Fuses, AC Power, Voltage Switch
Dimensions: 21-5/8"W x 10"H x 9.5"D, 40lbs.
Tubes: Power: 2 x EL84, Pre-amp: 2 x 12AX7
Years in use: Nov-Dec 2007
Website: http://www.orangeamps.com/
The Orange AD50 Amplifier that Jimmy Page used at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert on December 10, 2007 was custom covered in black tolex, instead of it's signature orange textured tolex.

Photos

Orange AD50 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Far right, on top
Orange AD50 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Far right, on top

Orange AD30 Amplifier

Orange AD-30 Amplifier
Orange AD30 Amps with Marshall 1982B Cabinet, December 10, 2007, 02 Arena, London, England
General Specs
Watts: 30
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Master Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, Gain, (2) Input Jacks (Hi & Lo) - Rear Panel: (3) Output Jacks, Foot Switch Jack, (2) Fuses, AC Power, Voltage Switch
Dimensions: 21-5/8"W x 10"H x 9.5"D, 40lbs.
Tubes: Power: 2 x EL84, Pre-amp: 2 x 12AX7
Years in use: ca. 1999-2008
Website: http://www.orangeamps.com/
Jimmy Page has used (2) of the Orange AD-30 Amplifiers since the beginning of the 1999-2000 tour with the Black Crowes.

The Orange AD-30 Amplifiers were last seen on June 7, 2008 at Wembley Stadium, Wembley, London, England when Jimmy Page played with John Paul Jones and Dave Grohl & Taylor Hawkins of the Foo Fighters.

Photos

Orange AD30 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Far left
Orange AD30 Amplifier
Jimmy Page's frontline, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Far left

Marshall 100JH Amplifier

Marshall 100JH Amplifier
Marshall 100JH Amplifiers, with Marshall 1982B
Cabinet, O2 Arena, London, England, December 9, 2007
General Specs
Watts: 100
Inputs: 4 Total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, (4) Volume - Rear Panel: (2) Output Jacks, Ohm Selector, Voltage Impedance Selector, AC Power, (2) Fuse
Tubes: Power: 4 x KT66, Pre-Amp: 3 x ECC83
Dimensions & Weight: 10-5/8"H x 29-1/4"W x 8-1/4"D, 48 lbs.
Years in use: Nov-Dec 2007
Website: http://www.marshallamps.com/
(2) of these amplifiers were presented to Jimmy Page by Dr. Jim Marshall, OBE for use at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert, on December 10, 2007.

Aside from the custom rear plate, these amplifiers were stock Marshall Jimi Hendrix handwired amplifiers. Page used (1) during the concert and had the other on standby.

Photos:

100JH Amplifier
Photo by Ross Halfin

Marshall JTM100 Super PA Amplifier

Marshall JTM100 Super PA Amplifier
Jimmy Page, June 28, 1969, Bath Recreation Grounds, Bath, England
General Specs
Watts: 100
Inputs: 8 Total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, (4) Volume - Rear Panel: (2) Output Jacks, Ohm Selector, Voltage Impedance Selector, AC Power, (2) Fuse
Tubes: Power: 4 x 6CA7, Pre-Amp: 4 x 12AX7
Dimensions & Weight: 13"H x 27"W x 12"D, 52 lbs.
Years in use: 1969
Website: http://www.marshallamps.com/

Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet

Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinets, August 26, 1971, Sam Houston Arena, Houston, Texas
General Specs
Watts: 100
Speakers: (4) 12" Celestion
Dimensions:
Inputs:
Years in use: ca. February 1970-January 1973
Website: http://www.marshallamps.com/
The Marshall 2029 PA Cabinets were seen on stage from ca. February 1970 through January 1973. The cabinets were seen on both sides of the stage, most likely for the Sonic Wave Theremin for Page and for John Paul Jones' keyboards.

The Marshall 2029 PA Cabinets were powered by Marshall 1959SLP Amplifiers.

Photos

Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Robert Plant, February 27, 1970, Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Jimmy Page, April 07, 1970, The Coliseum, Charlotte, North Carolina
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Robert Plant, August 22, 1970, Tarrant County Arena, Fort Worth, Texas
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Jimmy Page, September 14, 1971, Berkeley Community Theatre, Berkeley, California
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Robert Plant, September 23, 1971, Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Robert Plant & John Paul Jones, February 20, 1972, Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Led Zeppelin, June 11, 1972, Baltimore Civic Center, Baltimore, Maryland
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Led Zeppelin, October 09, 1972, Osaka Festival Hall, Osaka, Japan
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Led Zeppelin, October 28, 1972, Pavillion Montreux, Montreux, Switzerland
Marshall 2029 PA Cabinet
Jimmy Page & John Bonham, January 27, 1973, Caird Hall, Dundee, Scotland

Resources and Information:

Doyle, Michael. A History of Marshall The Illustrated Story Of The Sound Of Rock. Milwaukee: Hal Leonard, 1993.

Marshall 1982 Cabinets

Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, June 19, 1969, L'Antenne Culturelle du Kremlin Bicêtre, Paris, France
General Specs
Watts: 120 watts
Speakers: (4) 30-watt Celestion G12H
Inputs: 2
Impedance: 16 Ohms
Dimensions & Weight: 29-1/2"W x 29"H x 14"D, 80 lbs.
Years in use: 1969-2007
Website: http://www.marshallamps.com/
Jimmy Page began using Marshall 1982A (Angled) and 1982B (Straight) Cabinets in ca. June 1969 up until the present time. The Zoso logo would appear on the grillecloth of the Marshall Cabinet at the beginning of the 1971 UK Tour on November 11, 1971 at Newcastle City Hall, Newcastle upon Tyne, England and disappeared during the rehearsals before the first Knebworth show on August 4, 1979.

Photos

Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, June 19, 1969, L'Antenne Culturelle du Kremlin Bicêtre, Paris, France
Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Jimmy Page, January 24, 1970, University of Leeds, The Refectory, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Jimmy Page, February 20, 1972, Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, England
Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, Whole Lotta Love, January 20, 1975, Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois
Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, June 26, 1980, Weiner Stadthalle, Vienna, Austria
Marshall 1982 Cabinets
Giving praise, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England

Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier

Marshal 1959SLP Amplifier
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love (theremin section),
HemisFair Arena, San Antonio, Texas, May 22, 1973
General Specs
Watts: 100 (Later 180)
Inputs: 4 Total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: On/Off Switch, Standby Switch, Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, Volume, Volume. Rear Panel: Output Jack, Output Jack, Voltage Impedance Switch, Voltage Impedance Switch, Fuse, Fuse
Tubes: Power Amp: 4 x EL34, Pre-amp: 3 x ECC83
Dimensions & Weight: 12-1/4"H x 29-1/2"W x 8-1/4"D, 45 lbs.
Years in use: March 1969 - ca. 1998
Website: http://www.marshallamps.com/
First known stage appearance of Marshalls during Led Zeppelin was in March 1969. He would use one up through June 1969 along side the Arbiter 'Power One Hundred' and Vox UL-4120. After seeing basically no use the rest of 1969 and through 1970, a Marshall Super Lead finally shows up again in March 1971 and continues to do so through the rest of 1971 along side the Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'. The Marshalls in 1971 were likely being used for guitar at times and the theremin. February 1972 would be the official switch. Marshalls would become the main amps he used live from '72 through the end of Zeppelin and beyond and the setup he would basically become famous for. At least one of the heads, and possibly the #1 head (serial # A10053), is said to be an early to mid '69 head and formerly owned by Hendrix.

As far as studio use goes, he says he used one for the unaccompanied Heartbreaker solo and Bring It On Home. In a July 1986 Guitar World interview, engineer Eddie Kramer said that he believed that Page used a Marshall top for the Houses Of The Holy sessions at Stargroves in May 1972. Other than that, he really never mentions what studio work was done with a Marshall which leaves things open for plenty of speculation and arguing.

At least one of amps were modded at some point. There are loads of debates about the mods that reportedly took place to his Marshalls, what mods were done and when they actually happened. The most well known and debated is the heads being fitted with KT88s boosting the output to 200 watts. That all stems from a 1977 Guitar Player interview with Page where he was asked about his stage gear, he replys by saying "Marshall 100's which are customized by Tony Franks in New York (he also customized Hendrix's amps) so they're about 200 watts, KL88s or whatever they call them." Those were his exact words, he even said KL88s not KT88s, I think it's clear he meant KT88s though. Other mods ranging from simple tonestack tweaks, to the preamp being wired for more gain have been suggested over the years. It's often argued the change over to cleaner tones in '75 was the result of the KT88s. Others argue KT88s were there as early as the '73 US tour explaining the tones from that tour and most notably the Garden shows (TSRTS performance). It's hard to say what the cause some of the tonal changes are, simple volume/eq changes, recording gear, different speakers, etc... so many possibilities, there were definitely some slight tonal changes on stage though over the years. In a May 1986 Guitar World article, guitar technician Tim Marten said that the Marshall recently returned from the factory in England where new transformers were installed and the amp was boosted from its original 100 watts.

Marshall amplifiers were seen on the 1998 Page/Plant tour for use with the Custom Theremin.

Photos

Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier
Jimmy Page & John Bonham, March 15, 1969, Egegård Skole, Box 45 Teen Club, Gladsaxe, Denmark
Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, May 27, 1969, Boston Tea Party, Boston, Massachusetts
Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier
Robert Plant, June 22, 1972, Swing Auditorium, San Bernadino, California
Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier
Jimmy Page, ca. 1975
Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier
Led Zeppelin, July 03, 1980, Eisstadion am Friedrichspark, Mannheim, Germany
Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier
Tony Franklin, ca. 1985

Malmberg 4x12 Cabinet

Malmberg 4x12 Cabinet
Malmberg Amplifier, powered by Marshall JTM100 Super PA Amplifier, March 14, 1969, Sveriges Radio TV Studios, Stockholm, Sweden
General Specs
Watts: 80
Speakers: (4) 20-watt Celestion
Inputs: 2
Impedance: 8 Ohms
Years in use: March 14, 1969
Website: http://www.hemipanter.se/
Malmberg Cabinets were handmade by Göran Malmberg, a Swedish guitar luthier, musician and car enthusiast. He sold his speaker cabinets to a wholesaler, who distributed them to the purchasers. The cabinets that were used by Led Zeppelin on March 14, 1969 were delivered by Mr. Malmberg personally on loan for the day. A few words were exchanged by the band and Mr. Malmberg, however the band was all business that day.

Photos

Malmberg 4x12 Cabinet
March 14, 1969, Sveriges Radio TV Studios, Stockholm, Sweden

Leslie Speaker Model 147

Leslie Speaker Model 147
General Specs
Speeds: Fast, Slow
Rotors: Bass, Treble
Speakers: 15" Bass Speaker, Treble Driver
Watts: 40 RMS
Channels: 1
Tubes: Pre-Amp: 12AU7A - Power: (3) 6550
Dimensions: 41"H x 29"W x 20-1/2"D
Weight: 149 lbs. (67.6 kg.)
Years in use: ca. 1968-1973
Website: http://www.hammondorganco.com/
The Leslie speaker is a specially constructed amplifier/loudspeaker used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals.

The Model 147 has the same cabinet, speaker and mechanical components as the Model 122; however, the amplifier input and motor speed control circuits are different. This is primarily because this series was designed to be "universal", which means it could be connected to other organ brands. The signal input is "single-ended", allowing a simpler connection to organs that have a built-in speaker system, as the Hammond A100 or a Wurlitzer. The Model 122 input is a differential, "double-ended" or "balanced line" design that provides for cancellation of any spurious noise that may be present. Also, the motor speed switching uses a separate 120V AC signal, rather than the DC voltage control of the Model 122. In operation, the noticeable differences between the Model 122 and the Model 147 are the Model 122's lower susceptibility to induced noise, and a delay between operation of the speed control and the actual change in speed. Just like with the 122 and 142, the Leslie Model 145 is identical to Model 147, except that it is housed in a 33" tall cabinet, and thus slightly easier to transport than the 41" tall Model 147.

Jimmy Page borrowed John Paul Jones' Leslie Speaker Model 147 in ca. October 1968 to record the guitar solo for Good Times Bad Times on Led Zeppelin. It may have been used in other songs.

John Paul Jones also used the Leslie Speaker Model 147 on stage with his keyboards.

Photos

Leslie Speaker Model 147
Leslie Speaker Model 147
Led Zeppelin, August 19, 1970, Kansas City Municipal Auditorium Arena, Kansas City, Missouri
Leslie Speaker Model 147
Led Zeppelin, August 19, 1970, Kansas City Municipal Auditorium Arena, Kansas City, Missouri
Leslie Speaker Model 147
Led Zeppelin, January 16, 1973, Kings Hall, Aberystwyth, Wales

1966 Hiwatt DR508 Amplifier

1966 Hiwatt DR508 Amplifier
Jimmy Page, Bath Festival, Shepton Mallet, England,
June 28, 1970, Hiwatt Custom 100 (unknown origin) on left
DR508 on right
General Specs
Watts: 100
Inputs: 4 Total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: Volume, Treble, Bass, Volume, Treble, Bass controls, On/Off Switch - Rear Panel: AC Cable, (2) Fuses, Voltage Impedance Switch (105V, 115V, 225V, 245V), Voltage Impedance Switch, (2) Output Jacks
Tubes:
Dimensions & Weight: 10-1/2"H x 25-1/8"W x 11-1/4"D, 45 lbs.
Years in use: June 28, 1970
Website: http://www.hiwatt.com/
The only known appearance of the 1966 Hiwatt DR508 Amplifier was at Bath Festival, Shepton Mallet, England, on June 28, 1970. It may have been rented for the festival or borrowed from another band.

Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'

Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
Jimmy Page, What Is And What Should Never Be,
Royal Albert Hall, London, England,
January 9, 1970
General Specs
Watts: 100
Inputs: 2
Features: Front Panel: XLR Switch, Input Volume, Balance, Bass, Treble, Middle, Presence, Master Volume - Rear Panel: Pedal Jack, Fuse, Fuse, Voltage Impedance Switch, AC Port, Pedal Jack, Ohm Impedance Switch, Output Jack, Output Jack
Dimensions & Weight: 10-1/2"H x 25-1/8"W x 11-1/4"D, 45 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 4 x EL34, Pre-Amp: 3 x 12AX7, 1 x 12AT7
Years in use: Jul. 1969 - Dec. 1971
Website: http://www.hiwatt.com/
Along with the Sola Sound Tonebender MK II, the Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page' is what defines Jimmy Page's early sound in Led Zeppelin. If you listen to his guitar sound of the 1970 Royal Albert Hall performance on the Led Zeppelin DVD, you are hearing the Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'.

Page first used the Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page' on the 3rd US Tour, in July 1969, after which they became his main amplifiers. Starting in the Back To The Clubs tour of 1971, he split up amplifier duties with the Marshall 1959SLP Amplifier and eventually stopped using them on stage by December 1971.

The preamp of the Hiwatts had been modified, giving the amp more gain. The power amp is the same as in a Hiwatt DR103, with the addition of a choke. Page also used wedge-shaped footswitch to cut the volume, when the Hiwatt was daisy-chained into another amp.

Photos

Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
Led Zeppelin, July 6, 1969, Newport Festival Field, Newport, Rhode Island
Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
Led Zeppelin, August 18, 1969, The Rock Pile, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
Jimmy Page & John Bonham, August 21, 1970, Tulsa Assembly Center Arena, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
Jimmy Page & John Bonham, Stairway To Heaven, November 20, 1971, Wembley Empire Pool, London, England
Hiwatt Custom 100 Amplifier 'Jimmy Page'
One of Jimmy Page's actual amplifiers

Resources and Information:

http://wholelottaled.webs.com/amps.htm

Fender Vibro-King Combo Amplifier

Fender Vibro-King
General Specs
Watts: 60 watts RMS
Impedance: 3 Ohms
Speakers: (3) 10-inch Fender
Inputs: 2
Features: Front Panel: (2)Input Jacks, Dwell, Mix, Tone, Fat Switch, Volume, Treble, Bass, Mid,Speed, Intensity, Pilot Lamp
Dimensions & Weight: 25"H x 23"W x 10.5"D, 73 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 2 x 6L6GC, Pre-Amp: 12AX7A
Years in use: 1994
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The Fender Vibro-King Combo Amplifier was seen in ca. August 1994 at London Studios, Studio 2, South Bank, London, England for the No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded studio tapings.

Photos:

Fender Vibro-King Combo Amplifier
Jimmy Page, Four Sticks, August 26, 1994, London Studios, Studio 2, South Bank, London, England

Resources and Information:

The Amp Guide

Fender Tonemaster

Fender Tonemaster
Jimmy Page & Rich Robinson, Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus, Wiser Time, October 13, 1999, Roseland Ballroom, New York City, New York
General Specs
Watts: 100 watts RMS
Speakers: (4) 12-inch Celestion Vintage 30
Inputs: 1
Features: Front Panel: Fat switch, Volume, Treble, Bass, Mid-Channel A/B Switch, Fat Switch, Gain Treble, Bass, Volume
Dimensions & Weight: Amp: 9"H x 24"W x 9.5"D, Speaker Cabinet: 27.75"H x 27.25"W x 13"D, 133 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 4 x 5881/6L6WGC, Pre-Amp: 3 x 12AX7A
Serial Numbers: 0864 & 0869
Years in use: 1995-2000
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The Fender Tonemaster amplifiers were recommended to Jimmy Page in ca. November 1994 in Buenos Aires, Argentina by Aerosmith's lead guitarist, Joe Perry, when Page said that he was going on the road with Robert Plant to support the No Quarter: Robert Plant and Jimmy Page Unledded album.

I really like the new Fender Tonemaster 100w heads that are made by Fender's Custom Shop. Joe Perry turned me onto them and one of the reasons I like the Fender is because of the consistency. I can pull one off the shelf somewhere and it'll sound just like the ones I have, whereas there are more maintenance issues with taking the Marshalls on the road. - Jimmy Page, Guitar World, June 1998.

Page also used them in the recording of Walking Into Clarksdale.

Photos:

Fender Tonemaster
Jimmy Page, November 2, 1998, SE+CC, Hall 4, Glasgow, Scotland
Fender Tonemaster
Jimmy Page, October 13, 1999, Roseland Ballroom, New York City, New York
Fender Tonemaster

1968 Fender Super Reverb Combo Amplifier

1968 Fender Super Reverb Combo Amplifier
Jimmy Page, Whisky A Go Go, West Hollywood,
California, January 2, 1969
General Specs
Watts: 40 watts RMS
Speakers: (4) 10-inch Jensen
Inputs: 4 Total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: Normal Channel- Bright Switch, Volume, Treble, Bass. Vibrato Channel- Bright Switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, Reverb, Speed, Intensity Control - Rear Panel: AC Outlet, Ground, Power and Standby Switches, Speaker, Ex. Speaker, Vibrato Jack, Reverb Jack, Reverb Out, Reverb In
Dimensions & Weight: 24.5"H x 25"W x 19"D, 60 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 2 x 6L6GC, Pre-Amp: 12AX7
Years in use: 1968-1969
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The 1968 Fender Super Reverb Combo Amplifier was used in the latter days of The Yardbirds and the early first few months of Led Zeppelin, before they received the endorsement from Rickenbacker for the Transonic amps.

Photos:

Fender Super Reverb
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, ca. 1967
Fender Super Reverb

Resources and Information:

The Amp Guide

Fender Dual Showman

Fender Dual Showman
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, ca. 1968
General Specs
Watts: 85 watts RMS
Speakers: (2) 15-inch JBL D-130F
Inputs: 4 total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: Normal channel- Bright switch, Volume, Treble, Bass Controls. Vibrato channel- Bright switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, Speed, Intensity - Rear Panel: AC Outlet, Ground switch, Power and Standby switches, Speaker Output Jacks, Vibrato and reverb pedal jacks, Reverb output and input jacks
Dimensions & Weight: Amp: 11"H x 26"W x 8"D, Speaker Cabinet: 45"H x 30"W x 11.5"D, 154 lbs.
Tubes: Power: 4 x 6L6, Pre-Amp: 2 x 7025
Years in use: ca. 1968
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The Fender Dual Showman rigs were used by Jimmy Page and Chris Dreja in the last few months of the Yardbirds, beginning on March 28, 1968 in Schenectady, New York.

After the Yarbirds broke up, the Fender Showman rigs were stored at Jimmy Page's Thames Boathouse in Pangbourne, West Berkshire, England. Allegedly, before the second United States Tour began in late April 1969, Jimmy Page instructed roadie Clive Coulson to swap the Fender speakers from the Dual Showman cabinet and replace it with the speakers from the Rickenbacker Transonic cabinets and then sell the Fender Dual Showman rigs to Sound City near Piccadilly Circus for some Marshall PA equipment. And thus, the monkier "Led Wallet" was born.

Photos:

Fender Dual Showman
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, ca. 1967
Fender Dual Showman
Jimmy Page, April 8, 1968, Thee Image Club, Miami Beach, Florida
Fender Dual Showman

Resources and Information:

The Amp Guide: http://www.ampwares.com/amp.asp?id=85
Cole, Richard (1992). Stairway to Heaven: Led Zeppelin Uncensored. New York City, NY: HarperCollins.

ENGL 4x12 Pro Slanted Cabinet

ENGL 4x12 Pro Slanted Cabinet
Jimmy Page's row of amps, December 09, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England. Photo by Ross Halfin
General Specs
Watts: 100 watts mono, 2 x 50 watts stereo
Speakers: (4) 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks
Inputs: 2
Impedance: 8 Ohms mono, 2 x 16 Ohms stereo
Dimensions & Weight: 29"W x 29"H x 14"D, 101 lbs.
Years in use: November-December 2007
Website: http://www.engl-amps.com/
The ENGL 4x12 Pro Slanted Cabinet was used with the Orange OR50 Amplifier and Orange AD50 Amplifier. The ENGL nameplate was covered up for the concert on December 10, 2007.

Photos

ENGL 4x12 Pro Slanted Cabinet
Giving praise, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England

Axis Combo Amp

Axis Combo Amp
British amp Jimmy used in ca. May-June 1970 at Headley Grange, East Hampshire, England to record Since I've Been Loving You. He found it outside the studio door.

Arbiter 'Power One Hundred'

1967 Arbiter 'Power One Hundred'
Jimmy Page, Communication Breakdown rehearsal,
L'Antenne Culturelle du Kremlin Bicêtre, Paris, France,
June 19, 1969, Arbiter 'Power One Hundred'
and Marshall 1982 and 1982b cabinets
General Specs
Watts: 100
Inputs: 4 Total (2 for each channel)
Features: Front Panel: (4) Input Jacks, (4) Volume, Bass, Treble, Master Volume, On/Off Switch, Standby Switch - Rear Panel: AC Cable, (2) Fuses, Voltage Impedance Switch (105V, 115V, 225V, 245V), Voltage Impedance Switch, (2) Output Jacks
Tubes: Power: 4 x KT88, Pre-Amp: 5 x 6AQ8
Dimensions & Weight: 13"H x 27"W x 12"D, 52 lbs.
Years in use: 1968-June 1969
Website: http://www.soundcitysite.com/
sc_webpages/sc_home.htm
The Arbiter amplifier was seen on stage from the beginning of the 1968-1969 US Tour through ca. June 1969.

At first glance, it looks similar to a Marshall amplifier.

Photos

Arbiter 'Power One Hundred'
Jimmy Page, ca. January 1969, Whisky A Go Go, West Hollywood, California
Arbiter 'Power One Hundred'
Jimmy Page, March 17, 1969, TV Byen, Gladsaxe, Denmark
Arbiter 'Power One Hundred'
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, June 19, 1969, L'Antenne Culturelle du Kremlin Bicêtre, Paris, France

Resources and Information:

http://wholelottaled.webs.com/amps.htm

Yamaha CJ32 Jumbo Acoustic

Yamaha CJ32 Jumbo Acoustic
Jimmy Page, c. 1998
General Specs
Body: Solid spruce top, solid maple sides and back, bound jumbo body
Finish: Black
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Bound ebony with split pyramid inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Ebony
Headstock: Black with inlay logo and flower
Tuners: Yamaha die-cast
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1998-2001
Website: http://music.yamaha.com/

Photos:

Yamaha CJ32 Jumbo Acoustic
Jimmy Page, Going To California, July 4, 1998, Molson Amphitheatre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Yamaha CJ32 Jumbo Acoustic
Jimmy Page recording My Bucket's Got A Hole In It, ca. October 2001, Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee

Washburn EA20-12 Acoustic/Electric

Washburn EA20-12 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page, No Quarter, Dolgoch Falls, Tywyn, Gwynedd, Wales, August 12, 1994
General Specs
Body: Solid spruce top, Quilted maple lam sides and back, Bound shallow body single Florentine cutaway
Finish: Tobacco Burst
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Bound rosewood with dot inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Rosewood Bridge
Headstock: Black with goldleaf printed logo
Tuners: Grover
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: Equis II
Controls: 3-Band EQ, Notch and Contour controls
Years in use: 1988-1996
Website: http://www.washburn.com/
First seen on the 1988 Outrider tour, Jimmy Page featured the Washburn EA20-12 Acoustic/Electric guitar on the re-worked song No Quarter for the Unplugged album and 1995-96 tour.

Photos

Washburn EA20-12 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page & John Miles, November 05, 1988, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Fieldhouse, Troy, New York
Washburn EA20-12 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, October 26, 1995, Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York

1967 VOX Phantom XII

1967 VOX Phantom XII
Keith Relf, Jim McCarty & Jimmy Page, April 15, 1967, Holtehallen, Holte, Denmark, Photo Courtesy of Jørgen Angel
General Specs
Body: Pentagonal maple
Finish: Black fiberglass
Neck: Bolt-on Maple
Fingerboard: Bound ebony with dot inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: Spring action vibrato, Adjustable Tune-O-Matic bridge & 2-way string damper.
Headstock: Maple with black printed logo
Tuners: Open back
Hardware: Silver-Nickel plated
Pickguard: White
Pickups: 3 single-coil
Controls: Individual volume knobs, 3-way rotary pickup switch
Years in use: 1967
Website: http://www.voxshowroom.com/
Jimmy Page started using the Vox Phantom XII guitar in the spring of 1967 to follow the electric folk rock trend of The Byrds, Bob Dylan and Fairport Convention. Page used the Vox Phantom XII on stage with the Yardbirds in 1967. In the studio, Page employed the Vox Phantom XII on the track Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor from the 1967 Yardbirds' album Little Games. Page also used the Vox Phantom XII with Led Zeppelin, recording the electric rhythm for the track Thank You from Led Zeppelin II at Morgan Studios in London, England in June 1969.

Photos

1967 VOX Phantom XII
Keith Relf, Jim McCarty & Jimmy Page, April 15, 1967, Holtehallen, Holte, Denmark, Photo Courtesy of Jørgen Angel
1967 VOX Phantom XII
1965 Magazine Advertisement
1967 VOX Phantom XII

Vega PS-5 Long Neck Banjo

Vega PS-5 Long Neck Banjo
John Paul, Maureen, Jacinda and Tamara Jones, ca. July 1970, The Straw Hat, Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, England
General Specs
Body: Maple ring with black cap
Finish: None
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Ebony with dot inlays
Frets: 25
Bridge: Grover Presto Tailpiece
Headstock: Black face with inlay logo, bone nut
Tuners: Vega tuners
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1970
Website: http://www.deeringbanjos.com/
The Vega PS-5 Long Neck Banjo is another one of John Paul Jones' instruments. Jimmy Page played it on Gallows Pole, the only Led Zeppelin track to feature a banjo.

Unknown Spanish Guitar

Unknown Spanish Guitar
When Jimmy Page was 13, his parents bought him a Spanish guitar. With no prior musical experience, "He just picked it up and started to play it. It all seemed so natural. He went along to a fellow in Kingston and had half-a-dozen lessons, but there weren't any guitar masters around in those days. After six lessons, the pupil was usually as good as his instructor."

Unknown Guitar

Unknown Guitar
Wasting My Time video, Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
General Specs
Body: Jackson Dinky-style, Basswood
Finish: Black
Neck: Bolt-on Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: Floyd Rose Tremolo
Headstock: Blackface
Tuners: Die-cast sealed
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: (2) Single-coil, (1) Lipstick-style
Controls: Volume, Tone & Blend knobs, 5-way selector switch
Years in use: 1988
Website:
Although not yet positively identified, this unknown guitar seen in the Wasting My Time video from Jimmy Page's solo album Outrider has features of both a Jackson guitar (headstock and body shape) and a Fender Stratocaster (Volume, Tone, Blend knobs). It does appear to be customized, however, in the fact of the pickups ( 2 single-coils in the bridge & middle positions and 1 lipstick-style in the neck position) don't seem to be standard in either Jackson or Fender guitars.

Photos

Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Unknown Jimmy Page Guitar
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988

Synclavier

Synclavier
General Specs
Information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synclavier
With the help of engineer John Mahoney, the Moby Dick/Bonzo's Montreux mix that appeared on Led Zeppelin (box set) was completed in May 1990 at the Atlantic Synclavier Suite in New York City, New York.

Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller

Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway body, Walnut and Ash
Finish: Acrylic, natural
Neck: Maple and Mahogany, thru neck construction
Fingerboard: Select Ebony with dot inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: chromed Melobar bridge
Headstock: Mahogany with GR logo
Tuners: Gotoh
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard:
Pickups: (2) Gibson PAFs
Controls: Volume knob, Guitar Tone knob, Cutoff Frequency knob, Balance knob, Resonance knob, Vibrato Depth knob, Mode Switch, 3-way selector switch, BC-13 24-pin Input Socket, 1/4" Output Jack
Years in use: 1981
Website: http://www.rolandus.com/
The Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller is simply the finest guitar synthesizer controller ever built. The G-808 was built around a modification of the Greco GO 1000 Guitar, a top-of-the-line guitar sold exclusively in Japan, and never imported into the United States.

The G-808 was designed for the cutting-edge player ready to pay top dollar for the very finest guitar that could be built. The G-808 is often described as a reverse Les Paul, with a mahogany over maple body. The fingerboard is ebony, which gives the guitar the strength and stability for accurate pitch tracking. Even today, Godin Guitars make a point of using an ebony fingerboard to provide stability for synth tracking. Also, like a Les Paul, the G-808 has a beautiful carved top that makes the guitar a joy to hold and play.

While more people are familiar with the G-303 guitar, thanks to Pat Metheny, the G-808 was the premium guitar, with complete through-neck construction, gold hardware and more. The G-808 was simply one of the best guitars available at the time, and sold with the GR-300, the finest and fastest guitar synthesizer ever built.

Jimmy Page used a Roland G-505 Guitar Synthesizer Controller Guitar, G-808 Guitar, TR-808 Rhythm Composer and (2) GR-300 Guitar Synthesizers (connected via US-2 Unit Switcher) in composing the soundtrack to the 1982 movie Death Wish II.

Photos

Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Japanese Magazine Advertisement
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
G-808 Control Diagram
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Guitar Player, April 1982 Advertisement
Roland G-808 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Guitar Player, April 1982 Advertisement

Resources and Information:

http://www.joness.com/gr300/GR-300.htm

Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller

Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
1984 Magazine Advertisement
General Specs
Body: Rectangular Ash body
Finish: Acrylic
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: Roland Tremolo
Headstock: Black with GR logo
Tuners: Gotoh
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: (2) Roland Humbuckers
Controls: Touch Plate A, Touch Plate B, Master Volume, Vutoff Frequency, Edit (Resonance), Guitar Tone, LFO Modulation (Vibrato Depth), Balance, Mode Switch
Years in use: 1984
Website: http://www.rolandus.com/
The Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller Guitar Controller was used with the Roland GR-700 Guitar Synthesizer.

Photos

Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller Controls
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
1984 Roland GR Brochure
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
1984 Roland GR Brochure
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
1984 Roland GR Brochure
Roland G-707 Guitar Synthesizer Controller
1984 Roland GR Brochure

Resources and Information:

http://www.hillmanweb.com/hillgt13.html

Roland G-505 Guitar Synthesizer Controller

Roland G-505
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway Ash body
Finish: Sunburst
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Maple with dot inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Roland Tremolo
Headstock: Maple with GR logo
Tuners: Gotoh
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: White
Pickups: (3) Single-coil
Controls: Volume knob, Guitar Tone knob, Cutoff Frequency knob, Balance knob, Resonance knob, Vibrato Depth knob, Mode Switch, 3-way selector switch, BC-13 24-pin Input Socket, 1/4" Output Jack
Years in use: 1981
Website: http://www.rolandus.com/
Jimmy Page used a Roland G-505 Guitar, G-808 Guitar, TR-808 Rhythm Composer and (2) GR-300 Guitar Synthesizers (connected via US-2 Unit Switcher) in composing the soundtrack to the 1982 movie Death Wish II.

Photos

Roland G-505
1980 Roland Brochure
Roland G-505
Roland G-505
Roland G-505 Schematic
Roland 1982 Brochure
Roland 1982 Brochure

Resources and Information:

http://www.joness.com/gr300/GR-300.htm

1957 Resonet Grazioso

1957 Resonet Grazioso
Jimmy Page with 'Malcolm Austin & The Whirlwinds', c. 1960, Left to right: Jimmy Page, Tony Busson, Stuart Cockett and Malcolm Austin. Photo courtesy of Tony Busson
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway Beech body
Finish: Two-tone Sunburst
Neck: Beech
Fingerboard: Beech with black dot inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Tremolo with indivdual saddles
Headstock: Beech
Tuners: White 3-in-line
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: White
Pickups: Mini, 6-pole Humbuckers
Controls: Master Volume and Tone rotary knobs, 3 On/Off Pickup switches
Years in use: 1958-1961?
Website: http://www.vintagehofner.co.
uk/hofnerfs/futurama/fut.html
From an October 1974 Jimmy Page Interview
My first guitar worth talking about was a Stratocaster. Then I had something called a Grazzioso--don't know where it came from. It was probably a Czechoslovakian version of Fender, that's what it looked like anyway.
In 1957/58, Selmer commenced the import of a three pickup solid guitar which was manufactured initially at Blatn in Czechoslovakia under the Trade name of Resonet by the huge Drevokov Co-operative, part of which made furniture and.....electric guitars!!) This guitar had the model name of "Grazioso" and was designed by a Mr Ruzicka who appears to have been the driving force behind all the Resonet guitars. (By the way, Resonet apparently means "music played in a graceful, smooth, manner" in Czechoslovakian.) No marketing man in the 50's could have lived with product titles like that for very long, so after a short period Selmer changed the name in their catalogue to Futurama. This guitar was the nearest thing to the Stratocaster that was available at that time in Europe, but at 55 guineas was just about affordable to the British. I don't suppose that it should come as any surprise that the Czechs actually gained their inspiration from a genuine Strat that they had imported from the States in 1955!

Paul Reed Smith McCarty

Paul Reed Smith Classic Electric
Jimmy Page, Gent Exhibition Hall,
Gent, Belgium, December 1, 1998
General Specs
Body: Double body cutaway, East coast maple top
Finish: Amber
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood fingerboard with dot inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: PRS Tremolo
Headstock: Matching amber
Tuners: White locking-style
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: McCarty pickups
Controls: Volume and Tone rotary knobs, e-way toggle pickup selector
Years in use: 1988-1998
Website: http://www.prsguitars.com/
The Paul Reed Smith McCarty Model was seen on the 1998 Page and Plant tour, being used by Jimmy Page on the song Walking Into Clarksdale.
 

Photos

Paul Reed Smith Custom 22
Jimmy Page, December 03, 1998, Festhalle Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

1988 Paul Reed Smith CE 24

1988 Paul Reed Smith Classic Electric
Jimmy Page (and John Miles), Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute Fieldhouse, Troy, New York, November 5, 1988
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway Mahogany body
Finish: Red
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot inlays
Frets: 24
Bridge: PRS Tremolo
Headstock: Matching color PRS Classic Style, Black truss rod cover
Tuners: Chrome PRS tuners
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: HFS/Vintage Bass pickups
Controls: Master Volume and Tone rotary knobs, 5-way rotary pickup selector
Years in use: 1988
Website: http://www.prsguitars.com/
Jimmy Page used the 1988 Paul Reed Smith Classic Electric on his Outrider solo tour in 1988.

 

Photos

1988 Paul Reed Smith Classic Electric
Jimmy Page, November 24, 1988, Hammersmith Odeon, London, England

Ovation Elite 1537-4 Acoustic/Electric

Ovation Elite 1537 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page, November 16, 1984, Lake District National Park, Scafell Park, Cumbria, England
General Specs
Body: AAA Sitka Spruce top, Walnut Leaf Hole inlays, Composite Lyrachord molded body
Finish: Natural
Neck: 5-piece satin
Fingerboard: Black Walnut with Walnut Adamas inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Walnut
Headstock: Walnut w/ raised gold decal logo
Tuners: Gold Schaller M6G tuning keys
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: Piezoelectric
Controls: Adamas 2 knob
Years in use: 1984
Website: http://www.ovationguitars.com/
Jimmy Page used the Ovation Elite 1537 Acoustic/Electric guitar on the 1984 UK Festival dates with Roy Harper.

Photos

Ovation Elite 1537-4 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page, November 16, 1984, Lake District National Park, Scafell Park, Cumbria, England
Ovation Elite 1537 Acoustic/Electric
1984 Magazine Advertisement

Ovation Adamas II 1581-7 Acoustic

Ovation Adamas II 1581-7 Acoustic
Jimmy Page, Friends, August 26, 1994, London Studios, Studio 2, South Bank, London, England
General Specs
Body: Solid Spruce top, Maple Leaf Hole inlays, Composite Lyrachord molded body
Finish: Walnut
Neck: Mahogany/Maple
Fingerboard: Walnut with dot inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Walnut
Headstock: Gloss Walnut w/ raised gold printed logo
Tuners: Gold Schaller M6G tuning keys
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: Adamas piezo
Controls: OP-24 Pre-amp
Years in use: 1984-1996
Website: http://www.ovationguitars.com/
The Ovation Adamas II 1581-7 Acoustic was seen from the early 1980s with Roy Harper, on the No Quarter: Robert Plant and Jimmy Page Unledded video and 1995-96 tour.

Photos

Ovation Adamas II 1581-7 Acoustic
Jimmy Page, July 28, 1984, Cambridge Folk Festival, Cherry Hinton, Cambridgeshire, England
Ovation Adamas II 1581-7 Acoustic
Jimmy Page, Friends, August 26, 1994, London Studios, Studio 2, South Bank, London, England

Ovation D868-5 Acoustic/Electric

Ovation D868-5 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page, Nobody's Fault But Mine, August 17, 1994, Aberllefenni Slate Quarry, Aberllefenni, Machynlleth, Powys, England
General Specs
Body: Solid Spruce top, Maple Leaf Hole inlays, Shallow Lyrachord molded body
Finish: Black
Neck: Select Hardwood
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Walnut
Headstock: Walnut w/ raised gold printed logo
Tuners: Schaller M6G tuning keys
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: None
Controls: OP-24+ 3-Band EQ, Pre-Shape and EQ bypass switches, Custom-taper volume slider
Years in use: 1994-1998
Website: http://www.ovationguitars.com/
The Ovation D868-5 Acoustic/Electric was seen on the No Quarter: Robert Plant and Jimmy Page Unledded video and on the 1995-96 tour on Nobody's Fault But Mine, Wonderful One, Gallows Pole and Four Sticks.

Photos

Ovation D868-5 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page & Nigel Eaton, October 19, 1995, Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York
Ovation D868-5 Acoustic/Electric
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, December 03, 1998, Festhalle Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

MSA D-12 Pedal Steel

MSA D-12 Pedal Steel
Jimmy Page, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England, c. January 1977, by Kate Simon
General Specs
Body: Solid hardwood body, aluminum magnesium alloy frame
Finish: Black
Neck: CNC-machined aluminum
Bridge: 10 individual cam-action bridge sections
Fingerboard: CNC-machined aluminum
Frets: 24
Strings: 12
Tuners: Gotoh tuners
Hardware: Chrome
Pickups: Single coil, 12 pole pieces
Controls: Master Volume and Master Tone knobs, 8 pedals
Years in use: 1977
Website: http://www.msapedalsteels.com/

Photos:

MSA D-12 Pedal Steel

Mosrite Melobar

Mosrite Melobar
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Mk II shaped body
Finish: Sunburst
Neck:
Fingerboard: Ebony with note marker inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: chromed Melobar bridge
Headstock: Metal logo badge
Tuners: Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: White
Pickups: (2) Melobar
Controls: Volume and Tone knob, 3-way selector switch
Years in use: ?
Website:

Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary

Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
General Specs
Body: Solid Adirondack spruce top, Solid East Indian rosewood sides & back, Grained ivoroid binding
Finish: Polished gloss/aging toner top, Polished gloss/dark filler body
Neck: Genuine mahogany neck, Modified V neck shape, Fossilized ivory nut (1-3/4" width)
Fingerboard: Solid black ebony fingerboard, Zoso sigil pearloid inlay on 5th fret, Robert Plant symbol pearloid inlay on 7th fret, John Bonham symbol pearloid inlay on 9th fret, John Paul Jones symbol pearloid inlay on 12th fret, 1968-2008 pearloid inlay on 20th fret
Frets: 20
Bridge: 1930s style belly - long saddle bridge, 16" radius/fossil ivory bridge saddle
Headstock: Solid/long diamond/tapered headstock shape, Solid Indian rosewood headplate, Grained ivoroid heelcap, Hermit pearloid inlay
Tuners: Nickel open gear tuners w/butterbean knobs
Pickguard: Tortoise color/beveled and polished pickguard
Website: Martin & Co.
The ABC Trust is proud to auction off this one-off Martin D-28 Marquis inlayed with the Celebration of Led Zeppelin's 40th anniversary in mind by one of Martin's most talented inlay artist Tracy Cox in coordination with JR Warner, Paul Hammond, Dick Boak and Christopher Thomas.

This unique guitar was constructed be Martin Guitar company (Custom Shop) and commissioned by our Affiliate From the USA, JR Warner, who has commissioned and built guitars for Jimmy Page and Brian May for their own collections.

Crafted to evoke the same powerful tone and sonorous projection as a pre-WWII D-28, the Martin D-28 Marquis Acoustic Guitar differs only by using the much less scarce, and therefore more affordable, Indian rosewood instead of Brazilian rosewood.

Hammond and Warner left for London on Dec. 3, 2007, and presented the guitar to ABC Trust CEO Andrew Webb in Soho a few days later.

Photos

Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 
Martin D-28 Marquis Led Zeppelin 40th Anniversary
 

Martin D-28 Marquis 'Zoso'

Martin D-28 Marquis 'Zoso'
General Specs
Body: Solid Adirondack spruce top, Solid East Indian rosewood sides & back, Grained ivoroid binding
Finish: Polished gloss/aging toner top, Polished gloss/dark filler body
Neck: Genuine mahogany neck, Modified V neck shape, Fossilized ivory nut (1-3/4" width)
Fingerboard: Solid black ebony fingerboard, Zoso sigil pearloid inlay on 5th fret, Capricorn symbol pearloid inlay on 7th fret, Scorpio symbol pearloid inlay on 9th fret, Cancer symbol pearloid inlay on 12th fret, Jimmy Page signature pearloid inlay on 20th fret
Frets: 20
Bridge: 1930s style belly - long saddle bridge, 16" radius/fossil ivory bridge saddle
Headstock: Solid/long diamond/tapered headstock shape, Solid Indian rosewood headplate, Grained ivoroid heelcap, ABC Trust hands pearloid inlay
Tuners: Nickel open gear tuners w/butterbean knobs
Pickguard: Tortoise color/beveled and polished pickguard
Years in use: May 11, 2011
Website: Martin & Co.
The guitar that Jimmy Page played at Roy Harper's 70th birthday celebration on November 5, 2011 was a Martin D-28 Marquis model based on the pre-war D28, selected at the Martin guitar factory by Paul Sinclair, JR Warner, and Paul Hammond. JR Warner had contacted Paul Sinclair and Paul Hammond as a result of their involvement with the American Led Zeppelin cover band Get The Led Out, as he knew their knowledge of all things Led Zeppelin and Hammond's knowledge of high-end guitars would help him create a surprise gift to mark Page's 63rd birthday on Jan. 9, 2007. Martin's custom shop did the custom inlay work at their request.

JR Warner had booked the trip to deliver the guitar over the Thanksgiving holiday in the states and Martin came through in having it ready to go in time. JR Warner booked an extra seat on the British Airways flight for the guitar.

Video


Thanks to nech

Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic

Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Solid Sitka Spruce top, Solid East Indian Rosewood sides and back, white Boltaron binding
Finish: Polished Gloss
Neck: Select Hardwood
Fingerboard: Solid Black Ebony with dot Boltaron inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Solid Black Ebony
Headstock: Solid East Indian Rosewood w/ raised gold foil logo
Tuners: Chrome enclosed tuning keys
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1970-1994
Website: http://www.martinguitar.com/

The Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic debuted at the Bath Festival of Blues & Progressive Music Festival on June 28, 1970, when Jimmy Page played The Boy Next Door (That's The Way). Page continued to use the Martin for That's The Way and Bron-Y-Aur until the end of the 1970 US Tour on September 19, 1970.

The Martin was next seen on the 1973 European Tour, when Page played it for Bron-Y-Aur Stomp. For the 1975 Earls Court shows, Page played the Martin D-28 Dreadnaught Acoustic for the acoustic set. To increase the quality of the sound, Jimmy Page used a Barcus-Berry Model 1355 Transducer, connected to a Barcus-Berry Model 1330S Preamp.

Page acquired a second Martin D-28 for the 1977 US Tour, assumedly for the different tunings of the various acoustic songs. The primary Martin D-28 was marked with a small white star in the center of the pickguard.

The Martin D-28 was next seen in 1990 in a 10-minute interview with Jimmy Page. He played the Chords into Kashmir as well as a few verses into the main song.

Page used the Martin D-28 on The Rain Song in 1994 in the No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded video.

Photos

Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, June 28, 1970, Royal Bath & West Showground, Shepton Mallet, England
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, June 28, 1970, Royal Bath & West Showground, Shepton Mallet, England
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, July 17, 1970, Grugahalle, Essen, Germany
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, ca. August 1970
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, September 4, 1970, The Forum, Inglewood, California
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, March 22, 1973, Grugahalle, Essen, Germany
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, April 1, 1973, Palais des Sports de Paris, Paris, France
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, ca. 1975
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, ca. 1977
Martin D-28 Dreadnought Acoustic
Jimmy Page, The Rain Song, ca. August 1994, London Studios, Studio 2, South Bank, England
   

Manson Triple Neck Acoustic Instrument

Manson Triple Neck Acoustic Instrument
Jimmy Page, The Battle of Evermore, August 25, 1994, South Bank, London, England, London Studios, Studio 2
General Specs
Body: Alpine Spruce top, Brazilian Rosewood sides and back
Finish: Brownburst
Neck: Brazilian Rosewood
Fingerboard: Brazilian Rosewood with dot pearl inlays
Frets: 24/21/22
Bridge: Rosewood
Headstock: Brownburst w/ logo
Tuners: Schaller tuning keys
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1994-1995
Website: http://www.andymanson.com/
The Manson Triple Neck Acoustic Instrument consisted of a 8-string mandolin, 12-string and 6-string guitar. It was built by luthier Andy Manson, who had built the Manson Triple Neck Acoustic Instrument for John Paul Jones. He had also built a similar Triple Neck Instrument for Japanese Led Zeppelin Tribute Band Cinnamon.

Page used the Triple Neck Instrument on The Battle Of Evermore on the No Quarter: Robert Plant and Jimmy Page Unledded album.

Photos

Manson Triple Neck Acoustic Instrument
Manson Triple Neck Acoustic Instrument

Jerry Jones Original Shorthorn® 3PU Guitar

Jerry Jones Original Shorthorn® 3PU Guitar
General Specs
Body: Masonite front and back, poplar frame
Finish: Black
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot pearl inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Gotoh bridge with adjustable saddles
Headstock: Black w/ logo
Tuners: Enclosed Gotoh tuning keys
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: White acrylic
Pickups: (3) Jerry Jones balanced Lipstick tube style
Controls: Volume & Tone concentric knobs, 5-way switch
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.jerryjonesguitars.com/
Jimmy Page purchased two of these in December 1993.

Jerry Jones Original Shorthorn® 2PU Guitar

Jerry Jones Original Shorthorn® 2PU Guitar
General Specs
Body: Masonite front and back, poplar frame
Finish: Black
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot pearl inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Gotoh bridge with adjustable saddles
Headstock: Black w/ logo
Tuners: Enclosed Gotoh tuning keys
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: White acrylic
Pickups: (2) Jerry Jones balanced Lipstick tube style
Controls: Volume & Tone concentric knobs, 5-way switch
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.jerryjonesguitars.com/
Jimmy Page purchased two of these in December 1993.

Jerry Jones Master Electric Sitar

Jerry Jones Master Electric Sitar
General Specs
Body: Masonite front and back, poplar frame
Finish: Coral
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot pearl inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Intonated sitar "Buzz" bridge
Headstock: Coral w/ logo
Tuners: Gotoh tuning keys
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: Acrylic
Pickups: Jerry Jones balanced Lipstick tube style (2 for main strings, 1 for sympathetic strings)
Controls: (3) Volume, (3) Tone concentric knobs
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.jerryjonesguitars.com/
Jimmy Page purchased two of these sitar-style guitars in 1998.

1993 Jerry Jones Double5 Longhorn

1993 Jerry Jones Double5 Longhorn
Jimmy Page, Domino, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey, October 9, 1999
General Specs
Body: Masonite front and back, poplar frame
Finish: Copperburst
Neck: Maple, painted white
Fingerboard: Rosewood with block pearl inlays
Frets: 21/23
Bridge: Gotoh bridge with adjustible saddles
Headstock: Copperburst w/ logo
Tuners: enclosed Gotoh tuning keys
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: Jerry Jones balanced Lipstick tube style
Controls: Master Volume, Master Tone, 5-position switch, 3-position switch
Years in use: 1999
Website: http://www.jerryjonesguitars.com/
The top guitar neck has three pickups and the bottom neck is a Bass6 tuned "E" to"E" an octave down from standard guitar. Jimmy Page purchased this guitar in December 1993.

Seen on October 9, 1999 at Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey, the 1993 Jerry Jones Double5 Longhorn was played by Jimmy Page on the unreleased song Domino.

Ibanez Custom AEL Acoustic

Ibanez Custom AEL Acoustic
Jimmy Page, Wah Wah, Marrakech, Morocco,
August 9, 1994
General Specs
Body: Single cutaway, spruce top, sycamore sides and back
Finish: Natural
Neck: Mahogany
Fingerboard: Rosewood with block pearl inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Rosewood bridge & Ivorex saddle
Headstock: 'Ibanez' logo inlay
Tuners: Ibanez Ivorex tuners
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: None
Pickups: B-Band UST Pickup & Ibanez SRTn Preamp with Notch Filter and Onboard Tuner
Controls: None
Years in use: 1994
Website: http://www.ibanez.com/
The Ibanez Custom AEL Acoustic guitar was used on Wah Wah and (Yallah) The Truth Explodes on the No Quarter: Robert Plant and Jimmy Page Unledded album.

1958 Hofner President Acoustic Archtop

1958 Hofner President Acoustic Archtop
Jimmy Page, April 6, 1958, Mama Don't Want Me To Play Any Skiffle No More, All Your Own BBC Childrens Programme, London, England
General Specs
Body: Venetian single body cutaway, carved solid spruce body top, and flamed maple back and sides
Finish: Brownburst
Neck: 5-piece maple/ mahogany/ beech/ mahogany/ maple, single layer white binding
Fingerboard: Rosewood fingerboard with triple dot inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Black dyed maple; height adjustable; plastic insert; Compensator tailpiece
Headstock: Hofner logo, black background with bell flower and leaf, accentuated curved sides, splayed top corners, single layer white binding
Tuners: Individual open backed, white knobs
Hardware: nickel-plated
Pickguard: Tortoiseshell with gold pinstripe; beveled edge
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1958
Website: http://www.hofner.com/

Photos:

1958 Hofner President Acoustic Archtop
Jimmy Page, April 6, 1958, Mama Don't Want Me To Play Any Skiffle No More, All Your Own BBC Childrens Programme, London, England

Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop

Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop
Jimmy Page, Going To California, San Diego Sports Arena, San Diego, California, June 23, 1972
General Specs
Body: Jumbo maple flattop, mahogany sides and back
Finish: Natural
Neck: Mahogany
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot pearl inlays
Frets: 19
Bridge: Cream acrylic bridge with rosewood base
Headstock: 'Harmony' inlay, 'sovereign' and crown painted on
Tuners: Kluson
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: Teardrop tort pickguard
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: May 1970 - June 1972
Website:
Jimmy Page most likely brought the Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop along with him to Bron-Yr-Aur in May 1970 to work out songs that would later appear on Led Zeppelin III. He also used it in ca. November-December 1970 at Headley Grange, East Hampshire, England to record Untitled.

Page brough the Harmony out on stage, beginning on the Return To The Clubs tour on March 5, 1971 at Belfast, Ireland's Ulster Hall through the end of the 1972 US Tour on June 28, 1972 at Tuscon, Arizona's Community Center.

The Harmony was used as his primary acoustic guitar on most songs of Led Zeppelin's acoustic set during this span of time, with the exception of Tangerine, in which Page played the Giannini GWSCRA12-P Craviola Acoustic.

Page can be seen on the cover of the November 2010 Guitar World magazine, holding the Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop.

Photos

Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, Going To California, March 5, 1971, Ulster Hall, Belfast, Ireland
Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop
Jimmy Page, Going To California, March 20, 1971, The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, England
Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop
Jimmy Page, November 20, 1971, Wembley Empire Pool, London, England
Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop
November 2010 Guitar World Magazine

Gretsch White Falcon

Gretsch White Falcon
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
General Specs
Body: Solid spruce archtop, laminated maple back and sides with gold sparkle-white-black-white layered binding
Finish: White
Neck: 3 Piece Laminated Maple
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl inlay and gold sparkle-white-black-white layered bindings
Frets: 22
Bridge: Melita Bridge, Cadillac G Tailpiece, Travis style vibrato arm
Headstock: Vertical logo
Tuners: Grover Imperial
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Black raised multi-layer pickguard
Pickups: (2) DeArmond Dynasonic
Controls: Master Volume, Neck pickup volume, Bridge pickup volume, Master tone knob, pickup selector switch
Years in use: ?
Website: http://www.gretsch.com/

1956 Gretsch Chet Atkins Model 6120 Hollowbody

1956 Gretsch Chet Atkins Model 6120 Hollowbody
Jimmy Page, ca. 1975
General Specs
Body: Single cutaway 16" x 2.75" maple body with f-holes with black and white binding
Finish: Gretsch Orange
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Ebony with block pearl inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: Nickel-plated 'V'-shaped Bigsby B-6 tailpiece with pivoting arm vibrola and compensated aluminum Bigsby bridge
Headstock: 'Gretsch' inlay
Tuners: Kluson
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Signpost and signature gold pickguard
Pickups: (2) DeArmond single coil
Controls: (2) Volume, (1) Tone, (1) Master Volume on cutaway, pickup selector switch
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.gretsch.com/

The 1956 Gretsch Chet Atkins Model 6120 Hollowbody was Jimmy Page's fourth guitar that he owned, after the Spanish guitar that this parents bought him at age 13, the 1957 Resonet Grazioso and a Fender Stratocaster. It is rumored that he played the Gretsch on stage in the early 1960s and in his earliest of studio sessions.In a July 1977 interview with Steve Rosen, Jimmy said that he traded the Gretsch Chet Atkins 6120 Hollowbody in for the 1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'.

Page acquired another Gretsch Chet Atkins model in the early 1970s and was photographed with it in the mid-1970s. He also used a Gretsch on the rhythm tracks for the Page & Plant song Walking Into Clarksdale.

1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck

1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Jimmy Page, The Rain Song, July 20, 1973, Boston Garden,
Boston, Massachusetts
General Specs
Body: Solid Mahogany, double cutaway shape with pointed ends, no binding
Finish: Heritage Cherry
Neck: 1-piece mahogany
Fingerboard: Rosewood with double parallelogram pearl inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Unbound with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: 5-ply black acrylic with beveled edges
Pickups: Double-black Patent Applied For (PAF) humbucking pickups
Controls: (2) Volume & (2) Tone Gold Speed knobs, 3-position toggle switch for the necks (located on lower horn), 3-position toggle switch for pickups (located between bridges)
Years in use: 1971-Present
Dimensions: 16"W x 17"L x 1-5/16"D, 34 lbs
Serial Number: 911117
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
For decades, the doubleneck has offered a great leap in versatility--two instruments in one--but at a price. It's quite large, hard to find, usually expensive, and often heavy. Furthermore, some might argue that the two-headed rare bird is, shall we say, less than aesthetically pleasing. Gibson set out in 1958 to build doublenecks in a fashion that would preserve or even enhance the company's considerable prestige, and the result was a pair of remarkable instruments, the first doublenecks ever produced on a commercial basis by a major manufacturer: the EDS(Electric Double Spanish)-1275 Double Twelve, Gibson's first electric 12-string, and the EMS(Electric Mandolin Spanish)-1235 Double Mandolin, which wasn't a mandolin at all. They were both innovative and well constructed. While very different, to be sure, the new guitars were Gibsons through and through.

The Gibson Double Twelve and Double Mandolin were the first factory-produced electric doublenecks to appear on the market (in 1958). Jimmy Page recorded Stairway To Heaven in Nov.-Dec. 1970 at Headley Grange, East Hampshire, England with the Harmony Sovereign H1260 Flattop, 1965 Fender Electric XII and 1959 Fender Telecaster guitars. In order to to avoid having to switch guitars mid-song, Jimmy Page went to Gibson for a solution. Receiving inspiration from blues man Earl Hooker, he received a Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck guitar, custom-built as Gibson was producing them in a per-order basis.

Jimmy Page debuted the Double Neck on March 5, 1971 at Belfast, Ireland's Ulster Hall for Stairway To Heaven (1971-2007). Additionally, he has used it on The Song Remains The Same (1972-2007), The Rain Song (1972-1996), Tangerine (1975) and Celebration Day (1971). Dave Lewis' Led Zeppelin: A Celebration says that Carouselambra was recorded in part with the Double Neck, beginning at 4:06 and Waiting On You, from Coverdale/Page.

The basics on that track (Waiting On You) were played on a Strat-type Jackson, then I doubled the "slide" parts with the 12-string half of my Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck. - Jimmy Page, Guitar World, May 1993

The 12-string neck was used on the solo for Please Read The Letter from Walking Into Clarksdale.

The guitar has remained stock since day one, except for the pickup covers, which were removed ca. November 1971.

According to 1998 Guitarist Magazine interview, "I don't know whether we'll ever take this on tour again" ponders Binky. "Like No1, it's been valued at upwards of 50 000 and that's a LOT of money to have on tour. Then again, if we can't match the sound, we'll have to...but sometimes I get a bit nervous."

Photos

1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Jimmy Page, Stairway To Heaven, March 5, 1971, Ulster Hall, Dublin, Ireland
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Jimmy Page, The Song Remains The Same, August 4, 1979, Knebworth House Grounds, Stevenage, England
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Jimmy Page, Stairway To Heaven, December 8-9, 1983, Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Jimmy Page, Stairway To Heaven, November 5, 1988, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Fieldhouse, Troy, New York
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Led Zeppelin, Stairway To Heaven, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
Led Zeppelin, The Song Remains The Same, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck
1968 Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck

Resources and Information:

Gibson Doublenecks by George Gruhn - http://www.gruhn.com/articles/gdouble.html
Steve Rosen's Jimmy Page Interview - http://www.zepagain.com/page_rosen.html
Whole Lotta Led - http://wholelottaled.webs.com/guitars.htm
Premier Guitar - http://digital.premierguitar.com/premierguitar/201001_1/?fm=2#pg1

1977 Gibson RD Artist

1977 Gibson RD Artist
Jimmy Page, Misty Mountain Hop
Stevenage, England, August 11, 1979
General Specs
Body: Maple
Finish: Natural
Neck: Laminated maple
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Blackface with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Schaller
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Black acrylic
Pickups: Gold-plated series VI humbuckers
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone (w/ push-pull pots), 3-way pickup selector, 3-way mode switch (Compression/Neutral/Bright)
Years in use: 1977
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Some time ago when the Gibson M-III was introduced to much fanfare, a lot of people could be overheard expressing awe at the possibilities of the switching system. But, as we’ve seen, this is only the latest example of Gibson’s long infatuation with complex switches. While the Les Paul Recording remains my personal favorite, it’s followed quickly by the often insulted RD Artist, occasionally referred to as the “Research & Development” Artist.

The RD line was originally conceived in 1975, officially introduced in 1977 and ultimately discontinued in 1982. The RD series was essentially Gibson’s response to the emerging success of companies like Alembic and B.C. Rich, which specialized in lots of switches with fancy electronic options. It’s curious to note that a Norlin subsidiary, the distributor L.D. Heater, of Portland, OR, handled B.C. Rich as well as Gibson guitars in the early ’70s. Early B.C. Riches used Gibson humbuckers obtained through L.D. Heater until Gibson found out. B.C. Rich switched to Guild and then DiMarzio pickups and took over its own distribution shortly thereafter. Maybe the RD was Gibson’s revenge?…

To execute this design, Gibson employed Robert Moog, of Moog synthesizer fame, and the man behind the last mach of the Gibson Maestro effects of that very same era.

The RD series was, admittedly, a little demented. First of all, its shape is sort of a retread Reverse Firebird, maybe the offspring of mating with a Guild Thunderbird (one which unfortunately didn’t inherit the built-in stand!). The maple body is comfortably contoured, though, and the neck solidly glued on for an overall pretty nice feeling guitar, sort of like an SG. Put a pillowcase over the body and you can get down with this baby.

The RD Artist was the top-of-the-line, with an unbound ebony fingerboard (the catalog said bound ‘board, but most if not all were not bound), block inlays, gold hardware, fancy bound pearl inlaid headstock and more comprehensive active features activated by a second large toggle switch. Pickups were two Gibson Series VI humbuckers with a threeway select, two volume controls, individual treble and bass tone controls, and a built-in preamp circuit with compression/expansion and bright/lead functions.

Unfortunately, Moog and Gibson didn’t just settle for a simple preamp switch like the B.C. Rich. Instead, we get another complex switching system on the Artist models. Here’s the skinny; bear with me.

The threeway pickup select and individual treble and bass tone controls are pretty clear and a very nice feature on any guitar. In the center position, the second threeway toggle switch is in neutral, making the guitar active but without the special circuits. In the forward position, the switch activates a bright/lead function which accentuates the treble frequencies. This works for both pickups.

In the back position, the active switch turns on a compression/expansion circuit. The compression function operates on the neck pickup only and reduces the fundamental attack time and “compresses” each note into a longer sustaining signal. In this mode, the output remains stable no matter how hard you play.

The expansion function (we haven’t moved the second toggle yet) operates on the bridge pickup only and “permits the player to play harder and louder without the note collapsing. Expansion offers a very fast, explosive response with a rapid decay,” says the Gibson literature.

Of course, either function works in the middle pickup selector position, too.
The only known appearance of the 1977 Gibson RD Artist was at the second Knebworth Festival show on August 11, 1979 for Misty Mountain Hop.

1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop

1991 Les Paul Custom Shop
Jimmy Page & Roger Giffin, ca. 1991
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top, mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Cherry Sunburst
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck, 1-ply creme binding, shaved to replicate the profile of No. 1
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Blackface with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Gold Grovers
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Raised cream acrylic
Pickups: (1) covered 1957 PAF humbucker, (1) 1957 Zebra PAF
Controls: (2) Volume & (2) Tone knobs (w/ push-pull pots), 3-way selector switch
Years in use: 1998-2007
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Built by Roger Giffin, the former head of Gibson's West Coast Custom Shop, the 1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop guitar was supposed to replicate Number One. It was also allegedly the prototype for the Jimmy Page Signature Gibson Les Paul (1995-1999). It has no serial number on the back of the headstock, only J. PAGE stamped in place.

This guitar was seen on the 1998 Page and Plant tour, being played on How Many More Times so that when Page got to the bowed section of the song, rosin applied to the cello bow did not damage the strings and electronics. It was also used on Shining In The Light from Walking Into Clarksdale. It was last seen at the O2 Arena Led Zeppelin reunion concert on December 10, 2007 for Dazed And Confused.

Photos:

1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop
Roger Giffin, ca. 1991
1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop
Roger Giffin, ca. 1991
1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop
Jimmy Page, ca. 1993
1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England
1991 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop

1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 2'

1959 Les Paul Standard 'No. 2'
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, The Forum,
Inglewood, California, March 24, 1975
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top, mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Tobacco Sunburst
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck, 1-ply creme binding, shaved to replicate the profile of No. 1
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Blackface with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Nickel Grovers
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Raised cream acrylic
Pickups: 2 Double-white covered PAF humbuckers, pickup covers on-again/off-again over the years, usually (but not always) in opposition to No. 1
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone, 3-way selector, pair of spring loaded buttons offering new pickup configs (installed ca. 1980-81)
Years in use: ca. January 1975 - Present
Serial Number: 91703
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Jimmy Page acquired 'Number Two' in late 1973 after the US Tour ended and used it on stage, beginning with the warmup dates for the 1975 US Tour. It was used for Over The Hills And Far Away, Moby Dick and for Kashmir because the latter required the DADGAD tuning. 'Number Two' was also used as a backup for 'Number One' so that no more damage would be done to 'Number One' like the bridge pickup cover coming off due to slapping the violin bow against the strings during Dazed And Confused and so that the string could remain rosin-free (although Number One was also used for Dazed And Confused).

Right away, Page had nickel Grover tuning machines installed to replace the original Klusons as well as having the neck shaved and refinished (both by technician Tim Marten in the early 1980s) to resemble the profile of the neck on 'Number One'. Page used 'Number Two' through the remaining Led Zeppelin tours. In the early 1980s, Page had push-pull pots installed for coil-splitting and (2) spring-loaded push buttons installed under the pickguard for series/parallel and phase switching by recording studio technician Steve Hoyland. Guitar technician Tim Marten also said that he and Page experimented with reshaping the bridge to make bowing the strings easier.

Page also brought it out on tour for The Firm for The Chase/Bow Solo, in the studio in 1992 for Take Me For A Little While, for the 1995 and 1998 Page/Plant tours and for the O2 Reunion concert.

Photos

1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 2'
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, March 24, 1975, The Forum, Inglewood, California
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 2'
Jimmy Page, ca. 1975
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 2'
Jimmy Page, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 2'
 
   

1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'

1959 Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top (visible center join), mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Cherry Sunburst
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck, 1-ply creme binding, shaved to an eliptical profile (by Virgil Lay of Lay's Guitars for Joe Walsh)
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Blackface with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Kluson tuners, later Gold Grovers
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Raised cream acrylic
Pickups: 2 covered humbucker PAF, original bridge PAF changed, firstly to a T-top, then later to a custom-wound Duncan, and has been covered/uncovered at various times, (neck) 1960 PAF
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone (w/ pull-pot switching added ca. 1980s), 3-way selector
Weight: 7 lbs., 8oz. (3.4 kg.)
Years in use: ca. April 1969 - Present
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Jimmy Page's 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'Number One' is one of the most iconic guitars in history. Dressed in the black dragon suit, cigarette dangling from the edge of his lips with 'Number One' slung low across his pelvis, chugging on the E7 chord riff to Whole Lotta Love is what most people think of when they think of Jimmy Page.

Page bought 'Number One' from guitarist Joe Walsh in mid-April 1969 for $1,200 and debuted it at the San Francisco shows at the end of the month. It soon took the place of the 1959 Fender Telecaster as his primary guitar on stage. In addition, Page used Number One in recording Led Zeppelin II. When Page received the guitar, the neck had been shaved to an elliptical profile (by Virgil Lay of Lay's Guitars for Joe Walsh) and had already had several repairs, including the headstock, which made the serial number go missing.

The original Kluson machine tuners were replaced with gold Grovers on August 9, 1969, shortly before that night's performance in Anaheim, California. By October 24, 1969, the white selector switch tip had gone missing and it had been temporarily fixed by November 4, 1969 by adding some gaffers tape. Also, around that time the chrome pickup cover had come off the bridge pickup, revealing a double-white PAF. By March 1971, a new pickup selector switch tip had replaced the gaffers tape. In November 1971, the jackplate had been rotated 45 degrees to resemble a diamond. Perhaps the output jack had been replaced.

Sometime after the 1972 Australian tour, the bridge pickup got replaced with a chrome-covered T-Top. By May 1973, the jackplate had been put back into the proper configuration. In 1975, the jackplate is broken again and gets held to the guitar body by sticky tape and is eventually fixed. On the 1977 tour, the jackplate once again is damaged and a piece of metal is crafted into a jackplate by laser operator, Steve Jander. This jackplate stayed on 'Number One' until 1985. In the early 1980s, the bridge pickup cover was removed, revealing a Seymour Duncan pickup. During The Firm's first tour in 1984, Page experiments a new look by taking the pickguard off but returned it by 1985. By 1988, an aged pickup selector switch tip replaced the white one and (1) push-pull pot had replaced an original pot to allow for in-out phasing of the pickups. Since then, 'Number One' has remained untouched.

Asked in the late 70's if much had been done to the guitar, when it was still being regularly gigged, Page said: "Yeah, it's been resprayed, but that's all gone now, it's all chipped off."Before Joe Walsh had sold the Les Paul to Page, he had already had it refinished

Although throughout the different decades, Page has relied on other guitars for different phases, such as the 1953 Fender Telecaster during the 1980s Roy Harper/Firm period and the Paul Reed Smith Custom 22 in the 1990s in the Page/Plant tours, he had returned to 'Number One'. In a April 1998 Guitar Magazine interview, Page said, "An awful lot of Walking in Clarksdale was played on this guitar" (including Burning Up) Page used 'Number One' with a Digitech WH-1 Whammy Pedal for the second guitar solo in the title track Walking Into Clarksdale. Most recently, it had been used for nearly half of their set at the O2 Reunion Concert on December 10, 2007 and the encore performance with John Paul Jones at the Foo Fighters' Wembley Stadium performance on June 7, 2008.

Photos

1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, June 28, 1969, Bath Recreation Grounds, Bath, England
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, August 9, 1969, Anaheim Convention Center Arena, Anaheim, California
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, August 18, 1969, The Rock Pile, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, November 4, 1969, Kitchener Memorial Auditorium, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Led Zeppelin, Dazed And Confused, March 20, 1971, The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, England
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Led Zeppelin, January 27, 1973, Caird Hall, Dundee, Scotland
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Led Zeppelin, March 27, 1975, The Forum, Inglewood, California
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, June 23, 1977, The Forum, Inglewood, California
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, August 11, 1979, Knebworth House Grounds, Stevenage, England
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Led Zeppelin, March 27, 1975, The Forum, Inglewood, California
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Pickguard removed, ca. 1984
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, April 16, 1985, Jacksonville Memorial Coliseum, Jacksonville, Florida
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, May 14, 1988, Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Jimmy Page, March 25, 1995, Pittsburgh Civic Arena, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
Led Zeppelin, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1' 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1' 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1' 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'No. 1'

Resources and Information:

Bacon, Tony. Million Dollar Les Paul: In Search Of The Most Valuable Guitar In The World. London: Jawbone Press, 2008.

1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'Keithburst'

1959 Les Paul Standard 'Keithburst'
Jimmy Page recording Heart of Stone,
ca. July 1964
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top, mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Cherry Sunburst
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck, 1-ply creme binding
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge, Bigsby B7 Tailpiece
Headstock: Blackface with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Kluson tuners
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Removed
Pickups: Zebra PAF Humbucker (Neck), Double-Black PAF Humbucker (Bridge)
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone, 3-way selector
Years in use: July 21-24, 1964
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The guitar is an original 1959 Les Paul Standard that was purchased new in March 1961 from Farmers Music Store in Luton, United Kingdom, by John Bowen. John played with Mike Dean & the Kinsmen and he had a Bigsby Vibrato fitted at Selmer's in London before trading the guitar in there for a Gretsch Country Gentleman in late 1962. The guitar was later purchased by Keith Richards, who was playing guitar in a little known outfit called the Rolling Stones.

Keith Richards used this guitar extensively in the early days of the Rolling Stones and it was seen regularly from autumn 1964 until 1966 when Keith began to favour a Les Paul Custom. Appearances on Ready Steady Go and classic songs like The Last Time and Satisfaction have been played on this guitar. There are many great photographs of Keith and the guitar.

Keith was the first major pop star to use a 'Burst'; he was probably partly responsible for inspiring both Clapton and Page to pick up Les Pauls. Keith owned and used a Les Paul Standard way before Clapton had one, before Jeff Beck, before Peter Green, before Jimmy Page, Mike Bloomfield, Joe Walsh, Billy Gibbons, Duane Allman etc. (need we go on?) Keith sold the guitar to Mick Taylor in 1967 when Taylor had replaced Peter Green (who in turn had replaced Eric Clapton) in John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers. The Bluesbreakers' classic British Blues sound was forged when Clapton plugged a 'Burst' into a Marshall JTM45 combo and Peter Green followed suit, later selling his 'Burst' to Gary Moore. Taylor had stood in for Clapton when he failed to show for a gig one night and ended up playing Clapton's own Les Paul, so it was inevitable that the young Taylor would go for the same guitar and he exclusively played this Les Paul up to his joining The Rolling Stones two years later.

Before Led Zeppelin, Jimmy Page was a red hot session musician who cut his teeth on a 3-pickup Les Paul Custom fitted with a Bigsby. It is possible that Jimmy considered buying the 'Keith Burst' from Richards or maybe just used it in the studio? We aren't entirely sure but we are sure that Jimmy used the guitar on at least one mid 60's recording session. Eric Clapton used the 'Keith Burst' in 1966 with Cream at the Windsor Jazz & Blues Festival. There are several photographs of Clapton with this very guitar at the concert. Maybe Clapton borrowed it from Keith?

Mick Taylor made his live debut with the Rolling Stones at the famous Hyde Park concert in July 1969 after the shocking premature death of Stones guitarist Brian Jones. The concert was immortalised by Granada Television, who filmed and released it as 'the Stones In The Park'. Taylor used the guitar to play No Expectations and Love In Vain; Taylor was also filmed with it backstage in the band's dressing room trailer before the show. The guitar appears next on the Rolling Stones' 1969 tour of America, when Keith and Taylor both played it; the film Gimme Shelter documents Keith using it for Honky Tonk Women.

There are also many photos of Mick Jagger with the guitar at some 1970 recording sessions, which may be the last documentation of this instrument in the hands of the Rolling Stones. Its disappearance is shrouded in mystery and controversy: Rumour has it that the guitar was stolen in 1971, either from the Marquee Club during the Stones' 'Farewell Tour' of the UK, or from Nellcote in southern France during the recording of Exile on Main Street. Dave Brewis of Rock Stars' Guitars recounts a story he heard from the next owner, Cosmo Verrico, who played guitar with the Heavy Metal Kids, who were signed to Atlantic Records alongside the Stones. The story goes that a Stones representative gave the guitar to Cosmo to replace one that was stolen. What is definite is that Cosmo did own the guitar until 1974, when he sold the guitar to Bernie Marsden of Whitesnake. Bernie owned the guitar for a little over a week. He sold it to guitar enthusiast Mike Jopp and thought he had done well when he made £50 profit.

Mike Jopp owned the guitar until 2003 when, brokered by Rock Stars' Guitars, it was sold to a private investor.

The 'Keith Burst' was next seen in late 2004 when it was offered up for auction by Christie's in New York. The guitar failed to meet reserve, possibly due to poor publicity and surrounding controversy. Rumour has it that a representative of Keith Richards laid claim to the guitar but this claim wasn't followed through, and Christie's let the guitar go to auction but the vintage guitar boom was still around the corner and original 1959 Les Pauls that are today $500,000 - $750,000 were then going for $150,000.

A private collector purchased the guitar in 2006 and it currently resides in Europe.

Photos

1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'Keithburst'
 
1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard 'Keithburst'
 

Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Standard

Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Standard
Long Distance Call, Jimmy Page & Joe Perry, January 12, 1995, Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony Jam, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, Grand Ballroom, New York City, New York
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top, mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Wine red
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck, 1-ply creme binding
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic
Headstock: Blackface with 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay
Tuners: Kluson tuners
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Multi-ply white
Pickups: (2) Double-Black PAF Humbucker
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone, 3-way selector
Years in use: January 12, 1995
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Jimmy Page may have borrowed this guitar from Joe Perry.

Photos

Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Standard
Jimmy Page, January 12, 1995, Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony Jam, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, Grand Ballroom, New York City, New York
Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Standard
Jimmy Page & Joe Perry, January 12, 1995, Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony Jam, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, Grand Ballroom, New York City, New York

Gibson Les Paul Recording

Gibson Les Paul Recording
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
General Specs
Body: Single cutaway bound mahogany body, carved top
Finish: Natural
Neck: 3-piece laminated Mahogany
Fingerboard: Bound ebony rosewood, mother-of-pearl block inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: Tune-o-matic bridge/stop tailpiece
Headstock: Multi-bound peghead with pearl split diamond/logo inlay
Tuners: Kluson
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: Black raised multi-layer pickguard
Pickups: 2 covered low impedance pickups, "Gibson" formed on pickup covers
Controls: Volume/decade/treble/bass controls, two 3 position switches, impedance/phase slide switches, built-in transformer
Years in use: ?
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Gibson changed hands in December 1969, and number of models changed significantly over the next few years; the Les Paul Bass and Professional guitar were redesigned to become the Les Paul Recording guitar and Les Paul Triumph bass respectively. So in 1971, to launch the newly redesigned models a 4 side low impedance Les Paul catalogue was produced including an interesting flexi-disc demonstrating some of the many sounds possible.

Photos

Gibson Les Paul Recording
Musician magazine, July 1988
Gibson Les Paul Recording
Musician magazine, July 1988
Gibson Les Paul Recording
1971 Gibson Brochure
Gibson Les Paul Recording
1971 Gibson Brochure
Gibson Les Paul Recording
1971 Gibson Brochure
Gibson Les Paul Recording
1971 Gibson Brochure

Resources and Information:

http://www.vintageguitars.org.uk/LPLI.php

Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe

1969 Les Paul DeLuxe
Jimmy Page, July 24, 1977, Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, California
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top, mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Cardinal Red
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck (sanded down), volute at base of headstock, 1-ply creme binding
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay, 'Deluxe' engraved on truss rod cover
Tuners: Grover Imperials, later Grover Roto-matic
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Raised cream acrylic
Pickups: (2) Gibson T-Tops
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone knobs and 3-way selector
Years in use: 1977
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe was used on Over The Hills And Far Away on the 1977 US Tour. There is no evidence that this guitar was used prior to or after this.

It differs from the 1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3' due to its smaller headstock and thin cutaway binding.

It may have been the 1952 Gibson Les Paul purchased on December 13, 1974 by Jimmy Page from The Babys' guitarist Michael Corby, in London, England. (Receipt shown below)

Photos

Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe
Jimmy Page, Over The Hills And Far Away, July 24, 1977, Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, California
Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe
Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Bonham & Raymond Thomas, July 24, 1977, Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, California
Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe
Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe
Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe
Classic Rock Magazine, December 2007

Resources and Information:

Whole Lotta Led: Guitars

1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3'

1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3'
Jimmy Page, ca. July 1973
General Specs
Body: Bound carved maple top, mahogany body, sides and back, 1-ply creme binding
Finish: Goldtop (sprayed Cardinal Red)
Neck: 3-piece mahogany neck, volute at base of headstock, 1-ply creme binding
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl trapezoid inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: 'Gibson' logo pearl inlay, 'Deluxe' engraved on truss rod cover
Tuners: Grover Imperials, later Grover Roto-matic
Hardware: Nickel
Pickguard: Raised cream acrylic
Pickups: (2) Gibson T-Tops, later Seymour Duncans (addded, ca. 1985)
Controls: (2) Volume, (2) Tone knobs, 3-way selector switch, Parsons/White B-Bender (added ca. 1985)
Years in use: 1970-Present
Website: http://www.gibson.com/

Jimmy Page started using the 1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3' ca. August 1970, presumably as a replacement for the 1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'. It was used only sporadically after that, at the Bath Pavilion on March 13, 1971 and at Southampton University's West Refectory for Dazed And Confused on January 22, 1973. It got a more stable role for the 1973 US Tour (with new Grover Roto-matic machine tuners, replacing the original Grover Imperials), used for Over The Hills And Far Away, Whole Lotta Love and the occasional encore of Thank You.

Number Three reappeared on The Firm's 1985 tour, modified with hand-wound Seymour Duncan pickups (still available special order from Seymour Duncan) and a Parsons/White B-Bender. It was also used in 1986 and 1988.

It was used in 1994-1998 on the Page & Plant tours for Thank You with its neck pickup covered.

Most recently, the 1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3' was used at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert at the O2 Arena in London, England on December 10, 2007 for Kashmir.

Photos

1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3'
Jimmy Page, Dazed And Confused, August 26, 1970, Cleveland Public Auditorium, Cleveland, Ohio
1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3'
Jimmy Page, June 3, 1973, The Forum, Inglewood, California
1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3'
Jimmy Page, January 10, 1990, Hammersmith Odeon, London, England
1969 Gibson Les Paul DeLuxe 'No. 3'
Jimmy Page, Kashmir, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England

1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'

1960 Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'
Jimmy Page performing Bring It On Home,
Royal Albert Hall, London, England,
January 9, 1970. Photo: Warner Strategic Marketing
General Specs
Body: Carved mahogany top, sides and back
Finish: Ebony
Neck: One-piece mahogany neck
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl block inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tunematic Guitar Bridge / Bigsby B7 Tremolo
Headstock: 'Gibson' logo and split diamond pearl inlay, 'Les Paul Custom' on truss rod cover
Tuners: Grover Roto-matic
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Multi-Ply Black
Pickups: (3) PAF Humbuckers
Controls: (2) Volume, (2), 3-way selector, (3) toggle switches were added in mid-March 1970
Years in use: 1962-1970
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The Les Paul Custom was first introduced in 1954 and was the deluxe version of the Les Paul regular. It is also known as the 'Fretless Wonder' and of course as the 'Black Beauty'. The 'Fretless Wonder' name came about because of the advertising which stated that the frets where low and smooth and give the guitar fast playing action. So it didn't mean that it had no frets. This guitar has a bit of history to it which is pretty interesting. In 1961 (4 years after this reissue model) the single cut-away LP body was actually replaced with the SG double cut-away ultra-thin body. In 1963 it appears that Gibson and Les himself had a disagreement which was temporary. It resulted in this double cut-away model being renamed the Gibson SG Custom. So there are some variations in this guitar which would normally go unnoticed because of the two distinctly different body shapes being used.

The '52 version had an LP body shape (single cut-away) and was made of mahogany with carved arched top. There was a 7-ply binding around the top and body edges. The bridge was a Tune-O-Matic with stud tail piece. There were other models that included the Bigsby tremolo (some nickel plated). The LP regular had a carved maple top while this version had an all mahogany body.

The 24.7 5 inch scale length neck was made of a single piece of mahogany with an ebony fretboard. The fretboard had 'block' (rectangular) pearl inlays as position markers and 22 frets. The neck joined the body at the 16 fret. On the headstock was a split diamond inlay that slightly larger than usual. The words '' Les Paul Custom' was inscribed in the bell shaped truss rod cover. The original tuners used where Kluson Super tuners which were replaced with Grover Roto-matics in 1958. The hardware was gold plated with a few excepts where nickel plated were used. One thing about the '52 version is it used two single coil pickups, an Alnico in the neck position and a P-90 at the bridge. Both had black covers with the Alnico pickup having famous rectangular pole pieces while the P90 had the adjustable pole pieces. There were a few guitars made with three P-90 pickups in place of the humbuckers. The wiring on this three pickup model is also different in that it had three volume controls with a single tone control. The tone control was placed where the toggle switch normally was located (this version didn't have a toggle switch). Another thing about the 52 version was that it didn't have a serial number. They weren't added until 1954 and where found on the top edge of the headstock.

The Black Beauty offers a variety of tones not found on other LPs. This was done by adding a third humbuckers. In 1957 one of the main changes was the introduction of the PAF humbucker pickup. Three of these were put on the LP Custom with most pickups be wired differently than other LPs of the time. Instead of having the middle position of the 3-way pickup selector activating the center pickup it actually had both the bridge and middle pickups on with the middle pickup out of phase with the neck pickup. The result is a unique yet vintage sound. There are some that have only two humbuckers while there are also others that have the three humbuckers but with different wiring and control setup. It had three volume controls that were lined up in a straight line with a tone control located where the toggle switch was located.

In 1961 the body of the custom was changed to the ultra-thin SG double cut-away body and was painted white. This marked a significant change so much so that in 1963 they changed the name to the SG/Les Paul Custom. Also there is a non-historic version of the Black Beauty which called the Les Paul Custom.

The 1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty' was purchased new in 1962 for £185. It was used for most of Jimmy's sessionwork (1963-1966), and was taken on tour, starting on January 7, 1970 at Birmingham, England's Town Hall through Apr. 1970, when it was stolen at the airport between Apr. 13 or 14, 1970. Jimmy Page placed an ad in Rolling Stone with reward, but it was never recovered.

I put on the Bigsby tremolo. Also, what I did, is, the Black Beauty originally had a single toggle switch. I took out the single switch and put in three on/off switches. You could have any combination of pickups on or off, even all pickups off!" (laugh) Yeah, Jimmy really liked that setup. - Joe Jammer

Then I got a Les Paul Custom which I stayed with until it was nicked in the States during the first 18 months of Zeppelin-the second or third tour. Usually I never took that on the road, because it was so precious. But things were going so well for us that I eventually took it over and it suddenly went.

It had a big tremlo arm and Joe Jammer custom wired it for me. I was starting to use it more than anything else. It got nicked off the truck at the airport-we were on our way to Canada. Somewhere there was a flight change and it disappeared. It just never arrived at the other end. I advertised for it in Rolling Stone. Just a photograph-no name-and a reward. No luck though, even though it was very recognizable for all the custom work that Joe Jammer done on it.
- Jimmy Page, CREEM Magazine, Winter 1980

Photos:

1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'
 
1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'
 
1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'
Jimmy Page, January 9, 1970, Royal Albert Hall, City Of Westminster, London, England
1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'
Jimmy Page, January 9, 1970, Royal Albert Hall, City Of Westminster, London, England
1960 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'
Jimmy Page, April 10, 1970, Backstage ant the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami Beach, Florida
 

Gibson U-Style Harp-guitar

Gibson U-Style Harp-guitar
Jimmy Page, Take Me For A Little While video, ca. 1993
General Specs
Body: Carved mahogany top, birch back and sides
Finish: Tobacco Sunburst
Neck: Mahogany neck and neck block
Fingerboard: Ebony
Frets: 16
Bridge: Floating maple bridge (ebony top) with a separate tailpiece
Headstock: Angled 'the Gibson' in handwritten scriot
Tuners: Ivoroid guitar tuners
Hardware: Metal
Pickguard: Tortoise
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1993
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Harp guitars, like this one from the early 1900s, are certainly relatives of the modern doubleneck guitar—offering, in essence, two stringed instruments in one, even though it is played as a single instrument. With the exception of a factory refinish that occurred in either the 1940s or 1950s, this excellent example is completely original (sans pickguard), and features Gibson’s iconic script logo on the six-string headstock. The top is crafted from spruce, with a neck made from mahogany and topped by an ebony fingerboard. The back and sides on this particular model are made from birch, which was quite standard for many Gibson models during this time—even though the company routinely advertised its back and sides as being made from maple. All of the tonewoods on this harp guitar are standard for what Gibson used during this period.

This Style U is the most common model of all Gibson harp guitars, and this particular model from 1917 is its most common configuration—10 sub-bass strings (tuned chromatic), and six standard strings (tuned to standard tuning). Earlier harp guitars, some of which were built with 12 sub-bass strings, are considered quite rare and hard to find in good condition. This Style U model measures approximately 45.5” in length, 18.75” in width, with a rim depth of 3.5”. Its scale length is 24.75”, and it weighs approximately 9.5 lbs. In 1917, its list price was $248.21—a pretty hefty price tag for any instrument in its day.

Photos:

Gibson U-Style Harp-guitar
Jimmy Page, Take Me For A Little While video, ca. 1993. Photo by Ross Halfin.
Gibson U-Style Harp-guitar
Jimmy Page, Take Me For A Little While video, ca. 1993. Photo by Ross Halfin.
Gibson U-Style Harp-guitar
Gibson U-Style Harp-guitar

1963 Gibson J-200 Flattop

1963 Gibson J-200 Flattop
Jimmy Page, White Summer-Black Mountain Side, April 23, 1970, Julie Felix Show, BBC Studios, Lime Grove, London, England
General Specs
Body: Spruce top; figured maple back, sides and back
Finish: Sunburst
Neck: Five-piece laminated maple neck
Fingerboard: Single bound ebony fingerboard with pointed end, crest fingerboard inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Rosewood "closed" moustache with pearl block inlays, black pearl dot pins; Tune-o-matic ABR adjustable metal bridge
Headstock: Bound with pearl plant/logo inlay
Tuners: Triangle metal tuners
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Celluloid pickguard with engraved flower motif
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1968-1970
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Originally borrowed from Big Jim Sullivan (or producer Mickey Most, depending on which Jimmy Page interview you read), Jimmy Page used the Gibson J-200 Flattop on Led Zeppelin for the songs Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, Your Time Is Gonna Come and Black Mountain Side.

It was seen on camera for White Summer/Black Mountain Side on the Julie Felix Show on Apr. 26, 1970.
The Gibson J-200 was eventually stolen, presumably after it was returned to its original owner.

Photos:

Photos:

1963 Gibson J-200 Flattop
Jimmy Page, White Summer-Black Mountain Side, April 23, 1970, Julie Felix Show, BBC Studios, Lime Grove, London, England
1963 Gibson J-200 Flattop
Jimmy Page, White Summer-Black Mountain Side, April 23, 1970, Julie Felix Show, BBC Studios, Lime Grove, London, England

1967 Gibson B-25 Flattop

1967 Gibson B-25 Flattop
Robert Plant, Juggy Studios, New York, New York, June 1969. Photo by Jim Cummins.
General Specs
Body: Round shoulder dreadnought shape, spruce top, mahogany back and sides
Finish: Tobacco Sunburst
Neck: Mahogany neck and neck block
Fingerboard: Rosewood with dot fingerboard inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Adjustable saddle with laminated maple bridge plate
Headstock: Gold silkscreened logo
Tuners: Metal tuners
Hardware: Nickel-plated
Pickguard: Black pointed styrene pickguard with Gibson logo in white
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1969
Website: http://www.gibson.com/

Photos

1967 Gibson B-25 Flattop
Robert Plant, Juggy Studios, New York, New York, June 1969. Photo by Jim Cummins.

1962 Gibson Everly Brothers Flattop

1962 Gibson Everly Brothers Flattop
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Jumbo shape, spruce top, mahogany back and sides
Finish: Black
Neck: 24.75"-scale mahogany neck
Fingerboard: Bound rosewood fingerboard with star fingerboard inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Oversized top belly bridge with 3 pearl dots, string anchor through bridge, adjustable saddle
Headstock: Pearl logo and star peghead inlay
Tuners: Metal metal tuners
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Huge double tortoise grain pickguards extend below bridge
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The 1962 Gibson Everly Brothers Flattop was given as a gift to Jimmy Page in 1974 by Ronnie Wood, guitarist of The Face and The Rolling Stones. This guitar was used neither on stage or in the studio, merely as Page's "backstage guitar", available to him as a warm-up before gigs or to comfort him in hotel rooms.

Robert Plant was seen with it in Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England in January 1977 as Led Zeppelin rehearsed for their 1977 US Tour.

Photos

1962 Gibson Everly Brothers Flattop
Led Zeppelin, ca. January 1977, Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England. Photo: Kate Simon
1962 Gibson Everly Brothers Flattop
Led Zeppelin, ca. January 1977, Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England. Photo: Kate Simon
1962 Gibson Everly Brothers Flattop
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982

1957 Gibson ES-5 Switchmaster

1957 Gibson ES-5 Switchmaster
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: 17" Rounded single cutaway, plywood maple top
Finish: Brown Sunburst
Neck: Three piece neck with two pieces of maple and a thin layer of dark wood
Fingerboard: Pointed-end rosewood with 5-ply binding and large block fingerboard inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic bridge (with no saddle retaining wire) on a rosewood base
Headstock: Single bound peghead, crown peghead inlay
Tuners: Single ring tulip tuner buttons, ribbed-back Kluson tuners
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Laminiated beveled-edge
Pickups: (3) Humbuckers
Controls: (6) volume/tone knobs (separate volume and tone for each pickup), 4-way slotted switch on cutaway bout with a Telecaster style switch tip (labeled "1,2,3,ALL")
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The 1957 Gibson ES-5 Switchmaster was seen in ca. January 1977 at Manticore Studios in Fulham, London, England for a photoshoot with Kate Simon.

It was also allegedly used in recording Death Wish II.
 

Photos

1957 Gibson ES-5 Switchmaster
Led Zeppelin, ca. January 1977, Manticore Studios, Fulham, London, England

1952 Gibson ES-5 Electric Archtop

1952 Gibson ES-5 Electric Archtop
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: 17" Rounded single cutaway, plywood maple top
Finish: Natural
Neck: Three piece neck with two pieces of maple and a thin layer of dark wood
Fingerboard: Pointed-end rosewood with 5-ply binding and large block fingerboard inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic bridge (with no saddle retaining wire) on a rosewood base
Headstock: Single bound peghead, crown peghead inlay
Tuners: Single ring tulip tuner buttons, ribbed-back Kluson tuners
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Laminiated beveled-edge
Pickups: (3) P-90 (Bridge pickup has riser spacer)
Controls: (3) volume controls, (1) master tone control on cutaway bout, all with tall barrel knobs
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
This guitar's only notable usage was for Death Wish II.

Gibson ES-350 Electric Archtop

Gibson ES-350 Electric Archtop
Jimmy Page, October 02, 2007, London, England.
Photo: Ross Halfin
General Specs
Body: Rounded cutaway, plywood maple top
Finish: Natural
Neck: Mahogany
Fingerboard: Rosewood with double-parallelagram inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic
Headstock: Blackface with crown peghead inlay
Tuners: Kluson
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Laminated beveled-edge
Pickups: (2) P-90
Controls: 2 Volume, 2 Tone & 3-position switch
Years in use: 2007
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
I recently bought a new Gibson 350 from the Gibson Custom Shop and I've found it very inspirational. Sometimes you get a new guitar that doesn't fight you, and suddenly all sorts of things start coming out of it. - Jimmy Page, Guitar World, February 2006.

Jimmy Page played the Gibson ES-350 Electric Archtop on In My Time Of Dying at the O2 Arena on December 10, 2007.

Photos

Gibson ES-350 Electric Archtop
Jimmy Page, October 02, 2007, London, England.
Photo: Ross Halfin
Gibson ES-350 Electric Archtop
Jimmy Page, In My Time Of Dying, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England

Gibson Custom Shop Jimmy Page Les Paul Custom

Gibson Custom Shop Jimmy Page Les Paul Custom
Jimmy Page, For Your Life, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Photo by Steven Gough
General Specs
Body: Carved mahogany top, Solid lightweight mahogany back, Multi-ply white/black binding on top and back
Finish: Ebony
Necks: 1-piece mahogany, '60s profile, Single-ply white binding
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl block inlays
Nut width: 1-11/16"
Scale: 24-3/4"
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Tailpiece: Bigsby or Stopbar
Headstock: Holly headstock veneer
Tuners: Tulip-style
Hardware: Worn Gold
Pickguard: 5-ply pickguard
Pickups: Jimmy Page custom BurstBuckers
Controls: (2) Volume and (2) Tone, Jimmy Page custom 6-way switch
  • Position 1 NECK
  • Position 2 BRIDGE + NECK
  • Position 3 BRIDGE
  • Position 4 NECK + MIDDLE
  • Position 5 NECK + MIDDLE + BRIDGE
  • Position 6 MIDDLE + BRIDGE
Case: Custom Shop Hardshell
Strings: Vintage .009
Dates of Production: 2008
Amount Produced: 500
Retail Price: $8,588.00
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Jimmy Page received the 1st in the series of the Gibson Custom Shop Jimmy Page Les Paul Custom (2008) for use at the Led Zeppelin Reunion Concert at the O2 Arena in London, England on December 10, 2007.

He used it on For Your Life, a song that had never been previously attempted on stage by Led Zeppelin.

Page deemed it too heavy to play, so he returned the guitar back to Gibson Custom Shop. The Darkness guitarist Dan Hawkins ended up with it and he had the Bigsby tremolo arm taken off and swapped pickups from a Gibson SG that previously had been owned by AC/DC guitarist Angus Young.

Photos

Gibson Custom Shop Jimmy Page Les Paul Custom
Led Zeppelin, For Your Life, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Photo by Steven Gough
Gibson Custom Shop Jimmy Page Les Paul Custom
Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, For Your Life, December 10, 2007, O2 Arena, London, England, Photo by Steven Gough

1920 Gibson A2 Mandolin

1920 Gibson A2 Mandolin
Jimmy Page playing The Battle Of Evermore, ca. 1977
General Specs
Body: Carved spruce top, birch sides and carved back
Finish: Sheraton Brown
Neck: 3-piece mahogany/walnut, joins at 10th fret
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl dot inlays
Frets: 20
Bridge: Ebony
Headstock: Paddle-shaped peghead has "The Gibson" logo inlaid in pearl
Tuners: Open-gear 4-inline with oval ivroid buttons
Hardware: None
Pickguard: Tort pickguard
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1977 & 2008
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Jimmy Page used the 1920 Gibson A2 Mandolin on the 1977 US Tour for The Battle Of Evermore. The mandolin was also seen in 2008, being played by Jimmy Page in front of Headley Grange, East Hampshire, England. He played The Battle Of Evermore.

Photos:

1920 Gibson A2 Mandolin
Led Zeppelin, The Battle Of Evermore, April 7, 1977, Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois
1920 Gibson A2 Mandolin
Led Zeppelin, The Battle Of Evermore, April 27, 1977, Richfield Coliseum, Richfield, Ohio
1920 Gibson A2 Mandolin
Jimmy Page, The Battle Of Evermore, Headley Grange, East Hampshire, England

Giannini GWSCRA12-P Craviola Acoustic

Giannini GWSCRA12-P Craviola Acoustic
Jimmy Page playing Tangerine, San Diego Sports Arena,
San Diego CA, June 23, 1972
General Specs
Body: Solid Sitka Spruce top and Solid Rosewood back and sides
Finish: Natural
Neck: Rosewood thru body
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl diamond/dot markers
Frets: 20
Bridge: Rosewood
Headstock: Rosewood
Tuners: Gold Grovers
Hardware: None
Pickguard: Tort ABS pickguard
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: Sept. 1971 - June 1972
Website: http://www.giannini.com.br/
The Giannini GWSCRA12-P Craviola Acoustic was seen on stage from September 24, 1971 to June 28, 1972. Page had two separate guitars, the differences most recognizable by the the fret marker inlays (One model has dot markers & a black pickguard, while a more ornate model has diamond fret markers and a tortoise pickguard). They were used on stage for Tangerine.

Video



Photos

Giannini GWSCRA12-P Craviola Acoustic
Less ornate model, Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, Tangerine, November 20, 1971, Wembley Empire Pool, London, England
Giannini GWSCRA12-P Craviola Acoustic
More ornate model, Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, Tangerine, June 22, 1972, Swing Auditorium, Sen Bernadino, California

1965 Fender Electric XII

1965 Fender Electric XII
Fender Electric XII
General Specs
Body: Solid 3-pice Alder
Finish: Sunburst with Nitrocellulose lacquer
Neck: One-piece maple bolt-on
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearl dot markers
Frets: 21
Bridge: Individual bridge saddles for precise intonation
Headstock: "Hockey stick"
Tuners: Chrome enclosed Fender
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS pickguard
Pickups: 2 Fender split-coil
Controls: Master Volume knob, Master Tone knob and 4-way rotary selector
Years in use: 1965-2009
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The 1965 Fender Electric XII was most likely acquired by Jimmy Page in his Yardbirds days, however the first confirmed usage of it was in December 1970 in recording Stairway To Heaven & When The Levee Breaks and in May 1972 at Stargroves, East End, Newbury, England, for The Song Remains The Same from Houses Of The Holy.

The Fender Electric XII made its first on stage performance on April 4, 2009 when Jimmy Page joined keyboardist Jason Rebello, bassist Tal Wilkenfeld and drummer Vinie Colaiuta for Beck's Bolero > Immigrant Song > Beck's Bolero along with fellow Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee, Jeff Beck.

Photos

1965 Fender Electric XII
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
1965 Fender Electric XII
JImmy Page & Jeff Beck, Beck's Bolero/Immigrant Song, April 04, 2009, Cleveland Public Auditorium, Cleveland, Ohio

1966 Fender Telecaster

1966 Fender Telecaster
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Single cutaway slab body
Finish: Blond with nitrocellulose lacquer
Neck: One-piece maple neck
Fingerboard: Maple with black dot inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Adjustable bridge saddles
Headstock: Gold Fender "transition" decal
Tuners: "Double line" Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS pickguard
Pickups: Flat pole single coil (chrome cover on neck pickup)
Controls: Master Volume knob, Master Tone knob, 3-position toggle switch, Parsons/White B-Bender (Date added unknown)
Years in use: 1980
Website: http://www.fender.com/
Jimmy Page used the 1966 Fender Telecaster for All My Love on the 1980 Over Europe Tour.

According to Binky, Jimmy Page's guitar technician, the 1966 Fender Telecaster was used in the studio (through a Marshall amp) on the guitar solo for Upon A Golden Horse and the 1st guitar solo from Walking Into Clarksdale from Walking Into Clarksdale.

Photos

1966 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1980
1966 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1983

1959 Fender Telecaster

1959 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1967
General Specs
Body: Single cutaway slab ash body
Finish: Blond with nitrocellulose lacquer (1959-1967), Paint stripped and handpainted dragon by Jimmy Page (1967-1971)
Neck: One-piece maple neck
Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearloid dot inlays
Frets: 21
Bridge: Top-loading bridge w/ adjustable chrome saddles
Headstock: Logo removed
Tuners: "Double line" Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White Bakelite, then handmade black single layer ABS pickguard, custom "metallic" pickguard for Dragon Tele era.
Pickups: Flat pole single coil (chrome cover on neck pickup)
Controls: Master Volume knob, Master Tone knob and 3-position toggle switch
Years in use: 1966-1971
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The 1959 Fender Telecaster, dubbed the "Dragon Telecaster", has a pretty wild life, although it ended in tragedy.

It was originally purchased in 1961 by John Owen for £107. It soon landed in the hands of Jeff Beck, his bandmate in the pop band, The Deltones. Beck brought the guitar with him to the Yardbirds in 1965 as a backup to his Gibson Les Paul. The original white Bakelite pickguard and switchtip of the Telecaster crumbled off and Beck had replaced it with a homemade black pickguard.

When Beck abandoned the Yardbirds in August 1966, the Telecaster was left behind for Jimmy Page to use (with its original white pickguard). By March 1967, eight reflective circles appeared on the front body of the guitar, perhaps as a nod to Syd Barrett from Pink Floyd, who donned a similar Telecaster in January 1967 for a recording session for the movie Let's All Make Love.

In late 1967, Jimmy Page stripped the Fender Blond paint off and handpainted a green, red and orange psychadelic dragon on the front of the ash body and replaced the pickguard with a pickguard made of clear acrylic with a sheet of diffraction grating film underneath.

Jimmy Page brought the Dragon Telecaster to Led Zeppelin and used it as his primary guitar until late April 1969 when he bought the Gibson Les Paul 'Number One' from Joe Walsh.

In addition, the Dragon Telecaster was used on Led Zeppelin in October 1968 and used for the guitar solo on Stairway To Heaven in late 1970.

In a 1998 Guitar World interview, Jimmy Page said the following about the fate of the Dragon Telecaster.

"I still have it (referring to the Dragon Tele), but it’s a tragic story. I went on tour with the '59 Les Paul that I bought from Joe Walsh, and when I got back, a friend of mine had kindly painted over my paint job. He said, 'Ive got a present for you." He thought he had done me a real favor. As you can guess, I wasn't real happy about that. His paint job totally screwed up the sound and the wiring, so only the neck pickup worked. I salvaged the neck and put it on my brown Tele string bender that I used in the Firm. As for the body... it will never be seen again! (laughs)"


Photos

1959 Fender Telecaster
Jeff Beck
1959 Fender Telecaster
Jeff Beck
1959 Fender Telecaster
The Yardbirds, October 1, 1966, Newcastle City Hall, Newcastle, England
1959 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, ca. March 1967
1959 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, September 7, 1968, Egegård Skole, Gladsaxe, Denmark
1959 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, March 14, 1969, Stockholm Konserthuset, Stockholm, Sweden
1959 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, May 2, 1969, Rose Palace, Pasadena, California

1953 Fender Telecaster

1953 Fender Telecaster
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Single cutaway slab Ash body
Finish: Botswana Brown
Neck: One-piece maple neck
Fingerboard: Maple with pearl dot inlays (1977), Rosewood with clay dot inlays (1979-present)
Frets: 21
Bridge: 3-paired adjustable bridge saddles
Headstock: Logo removed
Tuners: "Single line" Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: Black single layer ABS pickguard
Pickups: Flat pole single coil (chrome cover on neck pickup)
Controls: Master Volume, Master Tone knobs, 3-position toggle switch, Parsons/White B-Bender (added ca. November 1975)
Years in use: 1977-1988
Website: http://www.fender.com/
Jimmy page bought the "Botswana Brown" 1953 Fender Telecaster from Robb Lawerence in November 1975.

"Found your post on Jimmy Page's guitars last night and wanted to let you know I sold him the brown Telecaster guitar many years ago. A fellow who worked with us at SRI studios worked for them and asked me to find a Telecaster and send it up to Gene Parsons for a pull-string device. I had Gene engrave the back plate with Jimmy's name on it. I originally found it in Ocean Beach (San Diego) near where I grew up. It is a '53 model dated from the serial number. I also have a few photographs of it with the receipt before I send it to Jimmy. I wish I had the old refinished neck since he put the Red Dragon rosewood neck on it."

Page used the 1953 Fender Telecaster on the 1977 US Tour for Hot Dog and Ten Years Gone. He switched the maple neck for the rosewood neck from the 1959 Fender Telecaster for the 1979 Knebworth tour. He also used it in 1983 on the ARMS tour, in 1984 with Roy Harper at English festival dates and in 1985-86 with The Firm.

Photos

Photos

1953 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, Ten Years Gone, April 10, 1977, Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois
1953 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, August 4, 1979, Knebworth House Grounds, Stevenage, England
1953 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, December 01, 1983, Cow Palace, Daly City, California
1953 Fender Telecaster
Jimmy Page, Roy Harper & Tony Franklin, July 28, 1984, Cambridge Folk Festival, Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England

1964 Fender Stratocaster

1964 Fender Stratocaster
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Asymmetrical double cutaway Alder body, contoured body on back and on lower bass bout
Finish: Lake Placid Blue finish
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with clay dot position markers
Frets: 21
Headstock: Alder with spaghetti logo
Tuners: Single Line Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS high gloss pickguard
Pickups: Three single coil pickups with exposed poles
Controls: Volume, Tone and Tone knobs & 3-way Selector Switch
Years in use: 1975-198?
Website: http://www.fender.com/
Jimmy Page acquired the 1964 Fender 'Lake Placid' Stratocaster ca. April 1975 and used it at the first dates of the 1975 Earls Court shows for No Quarter and Over The Hills And Far Away. It was also used in 1979 and 1980 for In The Evening.

In the studio, Page used the Fender Stratocaster in the Presence sessions, on For Your Life and Hots On For Nowhere.

Page continued to employ the Strat into the 1980s, in his solo Firm dates.

Photos

1964 Fender Stratocaster
Led Zeppelin, Over The Hills And Far Away, ca. May 1975, Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, England
1964 Fender Stratocaster
Led Zeppelin, In The Evening, ca. August 1979, Knebworth House Grounds, Stevenage, England
1964 Fender Stratocaster
Led Zeppelin, July 3, 1980, Eisstadion am Friedrichspark, Mannheim, Germany
1964 Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1984

1957 Fender Stratocaster

1957 Fender Stratocaster
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Asymmetrical double cutaway Alder body, contoured body on back and on lower bass bout
Finish: Two-color sunburst finish
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Maple with black dot position markers
Frets: 21
Headstock: Alder with spaghetti logo
Tuners: Single Line Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS high gloss pickguard
Pickups: Three single coil pickups with exposed poles
Controls: Volume, Tone and Tone knobs & 3-way Selector switch
Years in use: 1973-1974
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The two-color sunburst 1957 Fender Stratocaster was seen in Jimmy Page's home studio in ca. June 1973. It is unknown if it was used in any recordings.

Page did use the 1957 Fender Stratocaster on stage, such as with Bad Company on September 4, 1974.

Photos

1957 Fender Stratocaster
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
1957 Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page & Bad Company, September 4, 1974, Central Park, New York City, New York

White Fender Stratocaster

White Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page, London, England, October 2, 2007.
Photo: Ross Halfin
General Specs
Body: Asymmetrical double cutaway Alder body, contoured body on back and on lower bass bout
Finish: Olympic White
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Maple with black dot position markers
Frets: 21
Headstock: Alder with spaghetti logo
Tuners: Single Line Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS high gloss pickguard
Pickups: Three single coil pickups with exposed poles
Controls: Volume, Tone and Tone knobs & 3-way Selector switch
Years in use: 1969
Website: http://www.fender.com/

This White Fender Stratocaster was used by Jimmy Page to record rhythm tracks on Thank You ca. June 1969 at Morgan Studios, in Willesden, North London, England.

Jimmy Page said in his photographic autobiography Jimmy Page by Jimmy Page that this guitar was also used on Ten Years Gone in Jan.-Feb. 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire.

At some point, Page loaned the White Fender Stratocaster to John Paul Jones. Jones returned the Strat back to Page in ca. Sept-Oct. 2007.

Black Fender Stratocaster

Black Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Fieldhouse, Troy, New York, November 5, 1988
General Specs
Body: Asymmetrical double cutaway Alder body, contoured body on back and on lower bass bout
Finish: Black
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood with clay dot inlays
Frets: 21
Headstock: Alder with spaghetti logo
Tuners: Single Line Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS high gloss pickguard
Pickups: Three single coil pickups with exposed poles
Controls: Volume, Tone and Tone knobs & 3-way Selector switch
Years in use: 1988
Website: http://www.fender.com/
This may have been the guitar that Jimmy Page used while with Neil Christian & The Crusaders.

Photos

Black Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Black Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
Black Fender Stratocaster
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988

1954 Fender Precision Bass

1954 Fender Precision Bass
Jimmy Page, Home Studio, Plumpton Place, East Sussex, England. ca. May 1973. Page is playing a 1957 Fender Stratocaster. Seen in background is an ARP 2500 and a1957 Gibson ES-5 Switchmaster.
General Specs
Body: Contoured ash body
Finish: Two-color Sunburst
Neck: One-piece 34"-scale neck
Fingerboard: Maple with pearl dot inlays
Frets: 20
Headstock: Two-color Sunburst
Tuners: Backwards-tuning Kluson
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: White single layer ABS pickguard
Pickups: Black staggered pole single coil
Controls: Master Volume and Master Tone knobs
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The 1954 Fender Precision Bass was seen in Jimmy Page's home studio in ca. June 1973. It is unknown exactly what tracks this bass guitar was used on however it may have been used in Lucifer Rising and/or Death Wish II.

Fender Custom Shop Bajo Sexto

Fender Custom Shop Bajo Sexto
Jimmy Page, ca. 2008, Music Room, Tower House, Holland Park, London, England
General Specs
Body: Alder body
Finish: Vintage Cream
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Maple with black fret dots
Frets: 24
Bridge: Bigsby Tele Bridgeplate with tremolo
Headstock: Maple with classic logo
Tuners: "Double line" Kluson Deluxe
Hardware: Chrome-plated
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: Barden
Controls: Master Volume & Tone knobs, 3-position selector switch
Strings: .016, .026, .036, .046, .056, .066
Years in use: 1991-2009
Website: http://www.fender.com/
"On 'Sons Of Freedom', I used a Fender Bajo Sexto 6-String. They made it for me when I was working with Coverdale. I'd worked with it in various rehearsals, but I'd done bits and pieces, and I waned to do a whole number on it. I mean, 6-string basses had been used before, we all know that, but i wanted to do one that went all the way through a song like a really raucous damn thing. That guitar helped create the riff for 'Sons Of Freedom'. If I'd played it a different day, I might have come up with a different riff, but that was the first one that came out of it. I'm pleased we used it. We also did a B-side of 'Most High' called 'The Window' with the Bajo and it sounds awesome-it's a wicked instrument." - Jimmy Page, September 1998 Guitar Shop Magazine

Photos:

Fender Custom Shop Bajo Sexto
Jimmy Page, ca. 1993, Coverdale/Page Tour Book
Fender Custom Shop Bajo Sexto
Jimmy Page, ca. 2008, Music Room, Tower House, Holland Park, London, England
Fender Custom Shop Bajo Sexto
Jimmy Page, ca. 2008, Music Room, Tower House, Holland Park, London, England

Fender 800 Pedal Steel

Fender 800 Pedal Steel
General Specs
Body: Solid hardwood body, aluminum magnesium alloy frame
Finish: Sunburst
Neck: 23-inch scale, 14 position markers
Bridge: 10 individual cam-action bridge sections, fully adjustible special effects mute, removable cover
Fingerboard: Custom-etched aluminum
Frets: 33
Strings: 10
Tuners: Patented Fender inset machine head assembled with fully-chromed keys
Hardware: Chrome
Pickups: Single coil, 10 pole pieces
Controls: Master Volume and Master Tone knobs, 6 pedals
Years in use: 1968-1970
Website: http://www.fender.com/
The Fender 800 Pedal Steel was used on Your Time Is Gonna Come from Led Zeppelin and Tangerine & That's The Way from Led Zeppelin III.

Steve Rosen: On "Tangerine," it sounds as if you're playing a pedal steel.

Jimmy Page: I am. And on the first LP there's a pedal steel. I have never played steel before, but I just picked it up. There's a lot of things I do first time around that I haven't done before. In fact, I hadn't touched a pedal steel from the first album to the third. It's a bit of a pinch really from the things that Chuck Berry did. But nevertheless it fits. I use pedal steel on "Your Time Is Gonna Come." It sounds like a slide or something. It's more out of tune on the first album because I hadn't got a kit to put it together.

Photos:

Fender 800 Pedal Steel

E-ROS Model 606 Dakota

E-ROS Model 606 Dakota
Recording Thank You, Morgan Studios, Willesden, North London, England, ca. June 1969. Photo: Dominique Tarlé
General Specs
Body: Jumbo full sized with solid spruce top and mahogany sides & back, rosette around sound hole
Finish: Natual polyester Satin
Neck: Bolt-on 5-piece
Fingerboard: Rosewood with binding and pearl dot inlays
Frets: 20
Headstock: Blackface
Tuners: Silver-plated machine heads
Hardware: Screw height-adjustable, uncompensated bridge
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: None
Controls: None
Years in use: 1969
The E-ROS Model 606 Dakota was made in Recanti, Italy from 1966-1970 by Fratelli Fuselli Brothers. It was an Italian EKO/J-45 knock-off.

Photos:

E-ROS Model 606 Dakota
Recording Thank You, Morgan Studios, Willesden, North London, England, ca. June 1969. Photo: Dominique Tarlé
Balalaika
Jimmy Page, John Bonham, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones, ca. summer 1969
E-ROS Model 606 Dakota
 
E-ROS Model 606 Dakota
 

Eko Ranger XII Electra

Eko Ranger XII Electra
Kooyong Stadium, Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia,
February 20, 1972. Photo: J. Wright
General Specs
Body: Jumbo full sized with laminated spruce top and mahogany sides & back
Finish: Natual polyester Satin
Neck: Removable
Fingerboard: Rosewood with binding and pearl block inlays
Frets: 20
Headstock: Matching
Tuners: Precision machine heads
Hardware: Rosewood bridge
Pickguard: Black Florentine
Pickups: Transducer
Controls: Volume and tone knobs
Years in use: 1972
Website: http://www.eko.it/
The Eko Ranger XII Electra Acoustic/Electric Guitar made a one-off appearance at Kooyong Stadium in Kooyong, Melbourne, Australia on February 20, 1972 when Jimmy Page played Tangerine.

Photos

Eko Ranger XII Electra
Promotional Literature

Dulcimer

Appalachian Dulcimer
Jimmy Page & Zacron, ca. Fall 1970, Thames River, near Pangbourne
General Specs
Body: Elongated "fish"-shaped, spruce top, oak frame
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Frets: 17
Headstock: Knob-shaped
Tuners: Rosewood
Years in use: Unknown

Photos

Dulcimer
Jimmy Page, ca. 1993, Pride And Joy video.

Danelectro DC-12

Danelectro DC-12
ca. 1998
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway "shorthorn", masonite top and bottom, poplar frame
Finish: Ebony
Neck: Hard maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Frets: 21
Headstock: Natural "coke-bottle"
Tuners: "Skate Key" style
Hardware: Stainless Steel
Pickguard: White "Seal" shaped
Pickups: (2) Lipstick single-coil style (4.5k resistance), chrome plated, Alnico magnet
Controls: Dual concentric tone, volume and pickup selector switch
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.danelectro.com/

1961 Danelectro 3021

1961 Danelectro 3021
Earls Court, London, England, ca. May 1975
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway "shorthorn", masonite top and bottom, poplar frame
Finish: Ebony
Neck: Hard maple, black paint sanded off
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Frets: 21
Bridge: Stainless steel, switched in 1982 to Quan Badass bridge
Headstock: Ebony "coke-bottle"
Tuners: "Skate Key" style
Hardware: Stainless Steel
Pickguard: White "Seal" shaped
Pickups: (2) Lipstick single-coil style (4.5k resistance), chrome plated, Alnico magnet
Controls: Dual concentric tone and volume, pickup selector switch
Years in use: 1965-1988
Website: http://www.danelectro.com/

Jimmy Page purchased the Danelectro 3021 from the Selmer Showroom in London, on Catting Cross Road. It is unknown exactly when Jimmy Page first used the 1961 Danelectro 3021 guitar, however the first picture of him playing it was in a studio session, ca. 1965. Although the studio cut of White Summer from Little Games was recorded with the Gibson J-200 Flattop, he began using the Danelectro in 1967 on stage for White Summer.

From a 1977 Interview with Steve Rosen:
I used it onstage for "White Summer" (Little Games). I used a special tuning for that; the low string down to B, then A, D, G, A and D. It’s like a modal tuning, a sitar tuning, in fact.

Page continued to use the Danelectro in Led Zeppelin for the White Summer/Black Mountain Side medley from 1968 through the April 1970 US Tour. It was brought out again on the 1975 US Tour for When The Levee Breaks and In My Time Of Dying. For the 1977 US Tour, 1979 Knebworth dates and the 1980 Over Europe tour, Page used it for the return of White Summer/Black Mountain Side, Kashmir and In My Time Of Dying.

Some time between the Knebworth concerts in 1979 and the 1980 Over Europe tour, the original Danelectro stainless steel bridge was replaced with a Leo Quan Badass Style Wrap Around bridge with individual adjustable saddles. The original screwholes are still visible.

In 1988, Page brought out the Danelectro for Kashmir at Atlantic Records' 40th Anniversary concert.

Photos:

1961 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, White Summer, January 18, 1969, Grande Ballroom, Detroit, Michigan
1961 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, White Summer, October 30, 1969, Kleinhans Music Hall, Buffalo, New York
1961 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, In My Time Of Dying, ca. May 1975, Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, England
1961 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, Kashmir, May 14, 1988, Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York
1961 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, ca. 1998

1958 Danelectro 3021

1958 Danelectro 3021
Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, November 24-25, 1988
General Specs
Body: Double cutaway "shorthorn", masonite top and bottom, poplar frame
Finish: Ebony
Neck: Hard maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Frets: 21
Headstock: Ebony "coke-bottle"
Tuners: "Skate Key" style
Hardware: Stainless Steel
Pickguard: White kidney bean-shaped
Pickups: Lipstick single-coil style (4.5k resistance), chrome plated, Alnico magnet
Controls: Dual round tone and volume knobs & pickup selector switch
Years in use: 1988
Website: http://www.danelectro.com/
The 1958 Danelectro 3021 was seen on the 1988 Outrider Tour. It is unknown which songs that it was used on.

Photos:

1958 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988
1958 Danelectro 3021
Jimmy Page, ca. 1988

Cromwell G-4 Archtop

Cromwell G-4 Archtop
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Braced spruce top, mahogany sides and braced back
Finish: Sunburst
Neck: V-shaped with 1-3/4" nut and 24.75" scale, custom string bender at nut
Fingerboard: White-Stripe Rosewood with pearloid triangular inlays
Frets: 19
Bridge: Rosewood
Headstock: Black with stenciled  "Cromwell" logo
Tuners: Open-gear 4-inline with oval ivroid buttons
Hardware: Nickel Gibson tailpiece
Pickguard: Firestripe raised pickguard, Grover-made bracket
Pickups: Charlie Christian single-coil
Controls: Master Volume & Master Tone knobs
Years in use: Unknown
Website: None
Cromwell guitars were built by Gibson in the 1930s and marketed through various catalog distributors. It is a good sounding budget archtop with a lot of style.



Photos:

Cromwell G-4 Archtop
Jimmy Page, ca. January 1970
   

Alembic Series I Bass Guitar

Alembic Series I Bass Guitar
from Guitar Heroes magazine, November 1982
General Specs
Body: Walnut and maple laminate over mahogany
Finish: High gloss polyester with satin neck
Neck: Thru body 3 maple + 2 purplehear laminates
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Frets: 24
Headstock: Walnut
Tuners: Chrome Alembic Gotoh
Hardware: Chrome
Pickguard: None
Pickups: SC-1 w/hx
Controls: Volume, low-pass filter with 3-position Q switch for each pickup plus pickup selector switch
Years in use: Unknown
Website: http://www.alembic.com/
The Alembic Series I Bass Guitar was seen in Jimmy Page's home studio in ca. June 1973. It is unknown exactly what tracks this bass guitar was used on however it may have been used in Lucifer Rising and/or Death Wish II.

Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Pepto Bismol'

Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Pepto Bismol'
Jimmy Page, December 20, 1993, Osaka Castle Hall, Osaka, Japan
General Specs
Body: Carved maple top, mahogany back and sides
Finish: 'Pepto Bismol'
Neck: One-piece mahogany neck
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl block inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Gibson logo in ivory, 'Les Paul Model' in scripted gold and 'Classic' on the 3-layer trussrod cover
Tuners: Kluson-style
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: Custom-wound Seymour-Duncans
Controls: (2) Volume & (2) Tone knobs, 3-way selector switch, AxCent Tuning System
Years in use: ca. 1993
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Pepto Bismol' (the nickname was dubbed by Jimmy Page) was seen on the 1993 Coverdale-Page Japanese Tour. Jimmy Page traded it to AxCent Tuning Systems (formerly TransPerformance) for the Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Eerie Dess' guitar.

Photos

Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Pepto Bismol'
Jimmy Page, December 20, 1993, Osaka Castle Hall, Osaka, Japan

Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Errie Dess'

Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Errie Dess'
Jimmy Page, Most High, August 23, 1998, Bizarre Festival, Köln, Germany
General Specs
Body: Carved maple top, mahogany back and sides
Finish: 'Eerie Dess'
Neck: One-piece mahogany neck
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl block inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Gibson logo in ivory, 'Les Paul Model' in scripted gold and 'Classic' on the 3-layer trussrod cover
Tuners: Kluson-style
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: Custom-wound Seymour-Duncans
Controls: (2) Volume & (2) Tone knobs, 3-way selector switch, AxCent Tuning System
Years in use: 1993-1998
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Errie Dess' was received by Jimmy Page from AxCent Tuning Systems (formerly TransPerformance) after trading in the Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Pepto Bismol' guitar.

It was played by Jimmy Page on May 9, 1998 at Saturday Night Live when he joined Puff Daddy for a live performance of Come With Me and was also used on the Page/Plant 1998 Walking Into Everywhere Tour.

Photos

Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Errie Dess'
Jimmy Page, Most High, August 23, 1998, Bizarre Festival, Köln, Germany
Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus 'Errie Dess'

Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus

1993 Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Jimmy Page, ca. 1995
General Specs
Body: Carved maple top, mahogany back and sides
Finish: Wine red
Neck: One-piece mahogany neck
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl block inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Gibson logo in ivory, 'Les Paul Model' in scripted gold and 'Classic' on the 3-layer trussrod cover
Tuners: Kluson-style
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: Custom-wound Seymour-Duncans
Controls: (2) Volume & (2) Tone knobs, 3-way selector switch, AxCent Tuning System
Years in use: 1993-1999
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
The Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus was used in 1995 and in 1998 for the Page and Plant song Most High.

Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus

1993 Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Jimmy Page, ca. 1995
General Specs
Body: Carved maple top, mahogany back and sides
Finish: Goldtop
Neck: One-piece mahogany neck
Fingerboard: Ebony with pearl block inlays
Frets: 22
Bridge: ABR-1 Tune-o-matic Bridge
Headstock: Gibson logo in ivory, 'Les Paul Model' in scripted gold and 'Classic' on the 3-layer trussrod cover
Tuners: Kluson-style
Hardware: Gold-plated
Pickguard: Black
Pickups: Custom-wound Seymour-Duncans
Controls: (2) Volume & (2) Tone knobs, 3-way selector switch, AxCent Tuning System
Years in use: 1993-2008
Website: http://www.gibson.com/
Jimmy Page began using the Goldtop Les Paul Classic Premium Plus while with David Coverdale, as seen on the music video for Pride And Joy. When Page reunited with Robert Plant in 1994, he used this guitar for the newly-extended Kashmir.

Page also used the Goldtop Les Paul Classic Premium Plus in 1999-2000 with the Black Crowes for Whole Lotta Love in the section before the Theremin Duel.

For the sliding sound on the end of 'sons Of Freedom', I used the TransPerformance guitar. I'm really happy with that guitar. - Jimmy Page, Guitar Shop, September 1998

Photos:

Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Pride And Joy video, Coverdale-Page
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
 
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
 
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
 
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Jimmy Page, Kashmir, August 26, 1994, London Studios, Studio 2, South Bank, London, England
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Jimmy Page, Whole Lotta Love, October 09, 1999, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Jimmy Page & Puff Daddy, Come With Me, October 09, 1999, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey
th jp19991013 06
Jimmy Page & Rich Robinson, Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus, Wiser Time, October 13, 1999, Roseland Ballroom, New York City, New York
Goldtop Gibson Les Paul Classic Premium Plus
Jimmy Page, ca. January 2008, It Might Get Loud
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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History


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October xx, 1968 - Led Zeppelin is recorded
October 19, 1968 - Final performance as the New Yardbirds
October 31, 1969 - Led Zeppelin II is released in the US
October 17, 1969 - Bonham is thrilled to play Carnegie Hall where Buddy Rich and Gene Krupa have performed
October 23, 1970 - Led Zeppelin III is released in the US
October xx, 1970 - The press lash out at the band over the Led Zeppelin III acoustic content
October xx, 1971 - Page and Plant venture around Thailand and India after the Japan tour
October 18, 1972 - Zeppelin rehearse at the Rainbow Theater for a UK tour
October xx, 1973 - Each member performs an individual film sequence for their concept film
October 31, 1974 - Swan Song hosts a party for the launch of its UK division
October xx, 1975 - Led Zeppelin decide not to tour and concentrate on recording new material
October 20, 1976 - The Song Remains The Same premieres at New York’s Cinema One
October xx, 1977 - Jimmy starts assembling a Led Zeppelin live album from recordings as far back as 1969
October xx, 1978 - Jones and Bonham record with Paul McCartney at Abbey Road Studios
October xx, 1978 - Rehearsals for In Through The Out Door in London
October xx, 1979 - All nine Led Zeppelin albums enter the Billboards Top 200 -- no other band has ever achieved this
October 10, 1980 - A private funeral is held for John Bonham at Rushock church in Worcestershire
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