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Celebration Day More Info

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Led Zeppelin DVD Easter Eggs

DVD 1, Main Menu: unloading airplane (Iceland, June 1970), 0:58 (audio: Moby Dick, RAH 1/9/70)

DVD 1, RAH 1 Menu: backstage at RAH while crowd chants "Zeppelin!", 0:32

DVD 1, RAH 2 Menu: Thank You at RAH, 0:24

DVD 1, Clips Menu: footage of Zep's tape vault, 0:38 (audio: Heartbreaker, RAH 1/9/70)

DVD 1, Audio Options Menu: arriving in Iceland (June 1970), 0:54 (audio: STH, Earls Court 5/25/75)

Credits Menu: various video clips, including amateur video, 1:54 (audio: Heartbreaker, RAH 1/9/70)

DVD 2, Main Menu: bow solo in airplane hangar (Iceland 6/22/70), 1:32

DVD 2, MSG Menu: backstage c. 1973, 0:50 (audio: SIBLY solo, 7/27/73)

DVD 2, between MSG & Earls Court: airplane footage (no audio)

DVD 2, Earls Court Menu: clips from the streets of Belfast, 1971, 0:54 (audio: Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Earls Court 5/24/75)

DVD 2, Knebworth Intro: footage of

DVD 2, between Earls Court & Knebworth: more airplane footage, 0:35 (audio: intro to Kashmir, Knebworth 8/4/79)

DVD 2, Knebworth Menu: amateur footage of crowd at Knebworth while crowd sings "You'll Never Walk Alone", 0:40
Knebworth crowd, 2:16 (audio: OTHAFA, 7/28/73)

DVD 2, Interviews: footage of film editing, 0:38 (audio: Thank You, probably RAH 1/9/70)

DVD 2, Promos: various 1977 amateur video clips, 5:18 (audio: TSRTS from the LTTE bootleg)

DVD 2, Audio Options Menu: amateur video clips from Seattle 3/21/75 and other shows, 0:45 (audio: Crunge jamming, Earls Court 5/25/75)

Led Zeppelin DVD Cover Origins

East and West Mitten Buttes

East and West Mitten Buttes at Monument Valley - seen from the visitor centre at the Navajo Tribal Park

Led Zeppelin DVD Essay 2

IMMIGRANT SONG (1972)
Considering the visuals and the soundtrack are actually a digitized 'mash' between two separate performances - the film footage taken from the band's performance at the Sydney Showground in Australia, in February 1972; the music from a Long Beach Arena show, in Los Angeles, in the summer of 1972 - the version of 'Immigrant Song' which opens Disc 2 is a wonderfully evocative bridge between the early, understated Zeppelin of the Albert Hall era and the full-blown grandeur their performances would assume throughout the rest of the seventies.

Plant says he enjoys the "panoramic sweep" of 'Immigrant Song'. "It's just amazing, on the tail-outs, the phrasing on those pushed guitar chords, and the vocals really work well too."

"The fourth album had just come out and we were on a roll," recalls Jones. "Even though the visuals and soundtrack are from different performances, the energy that comes across is palpable."

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN (1973)
And then, with the blink of an eye, we are at Madison Square Garden in July 1973. The three shows Zeppelin performed there over the weekend of July 27-29 marked the end of an American tour that saw them drawing bigger crowds to their shows that anyone before, including the Beatles and the Stones, and when we cut to them on stage doing 'Black Dog', it's clear we are into new territory, both band and audience feeding off the electricity pulsing back and forth between them.

The setting is immediately more glamorous too. Indeed, the whole band appear to have undergone a dramatic transformation.
"Originally, we saw the whole essence of our live performance as something that the audience listened to very carefully, picking up on what was going on, the spontaneity and musicianship," says Page. "By the time you see us in New York, though, we're so full of confidence now that the showmanship has started to come through and we're working together with almost a telepathy between us..."

As Jones Observes, "Performing in America was always different to anywhere else. The actual event was almost as important as the music. But it was never contrived. Visually the real theatre relied more on the performances of Robert and Jimmy. They gave the band a visual presence it would never otherwise have had."

"It was such a big deal by then," says Plant, "but the feeling of freedom it gave out was tremendous. We were buccaneer musicians, ready to try anything and, for me, Madison Square Garden was a seminal moment. Until then, I don't think I could have ever imagined something like that. It was like having a dream come true that you never knew you had."

EARLS COURT (1975)
By contrast, the footage from the band's five-night residency at London's Earls Court arena, spread over two weeks in May (17-18 and 23-25) 1975, is captured here in refreshingly intimate style. Then the largest indoor arena in Britain, the band had installed two 24x30-feet Eidophor video screens either side of the stage, designed to send out close-up pictures of them performing so that everyone at Earls Court would be able to see what was going on. That they had also decided to record some of the shows was "more down to luck than anything," Plant recalls. Their first British shows for over two years, they simply wanted to keep a record of the shows for themselves. "There was no thought that we might end up doing something like this with them one day."
Focusing initially on the acoustic segment where Robert, Jimmy and John Paul would all gather together on stools, it serves as a touchingly personal interlude after the hypnotic frenzy of New York. Plant says he was "flabbergasted at how good the Earls Court footage is. You can clearly see how loose it was, how much fun."

There are also riveting electric versions from those show of 'In My Time Of Dying', 'Trampled Underfoot' and a superior version of 'Stairway To Heaven'. "Because it was the first time that back projection had been employed at a rock concert, it's all in close-up and you get a completely different ambience to the rest of the material," says Page. "You don't really get any idea of how big the show we were doing was, it's more like we're just in a room together playing."

KNEBWORTH (1979)
The final concert footage from Knebworth offers a completely different ambience. The two shows Zeppelin gave there on August 4 and 11, 1979, found them performing to a mammoth combined audience of over 400,000 people. Their first appearances in Britain since Earls Court four years before, though none of us knew it then, would also be their last, a fact which adds an emotional piquancy to these performances.

Jones says he is particularly fond of the Knebworth material because "although it seemed like this really huge event from afar, actually when you get really close-up it's still the same four people all in ahuddle together on the stage."

"When the early punks said it was self-indulgant they missed the point," says Plant. "It was the opposite: to achieve what we did on stage, it took a lot of personal restraint. It was this completely selfless form. Everybody was the captain of the ship at one time or another..."

Featuring the first-ever live performances of some of the amterial from the band's 'In Through The Out Door' album, which was about to be released, the highlights from Knebworth are innumerable. Special mention must go, though, to such spectacular moments as 'Achilles Last Stand', 'In The Evening' and 'Kashmir', where far from appearing to be nearing the end of the road the band actually sound more defiantly in command of their music ever.

For Page, Knebworth is "as intense as anything on the DVD. The whole thing's like a complete assault, really. That's what hit me when I first looked at it again. I had seen bits of it here and there over the years, but what we managed to find was extraordinary, new footage and angles from cameras we never even knew existed."

By the time we see them bowing out with 'Whole Lotta Love'm the band has been on stage for nearly three hours and it is now some time in the early morning, and compared to the relatively faithful version of the number we first encountered back at the Albert Hall nine years before this is a completely new numberl the band embroiled in a diamond-hard, almost machine-like groove, the famous, knife-quivering riff turned inside-out, Plant's vocals unexpectedly dark and glowering.

"Everything was always in a state of flux," says Jones. "It kept the whole thing alive, as opposed to just being a jukebox. And I suppose Knebworth was just the night that 'Whole Lotta Love' became funky. We never knew or planned it and that was part of the appeal."

EXTRAS
The additional material on Disc 2 comprises yet more fascinating tidbits, such as the footage from 1973 of the band and their entourage boarding the famous 'Starship' - the Boeing 720B 40-seater in which they traveled America.

Another fun item is the TV news footage of a rare press conference Robert and Jimmy gave in New York together, in September 1970, to promote Zeppelin's forthcoming brace of concerts at Madison Square Garden, coinciding with the third Zeppelin album going to No. 1. Similarly, another televised press party, this time in Sydney, in February 1972 (during the same Australian tour the SHowground footage was shot). Originally shot on 16mm black-and-white film, it's notable for the surprisingly good footage of the band doing 'Rock And Roll' and for the footage of John Bonham being interviewed by a rebellious-looking young woman named Germaine Greer, who talks about a then-recently released fourth album and the different musical styles on it.

The interview with Robert which follows was originally done for the weekly BBC TV show 'The Old Grey Whistle Test', and was first broadcast on January 12, 1975. Shot backstage in Brussels during warm-ups for the 1975 American tour. Robert talks about how much he is looking forward to coming back to England tha summer for the Earls Court shows.

There are aalso a couple of interesting promo films. The first, Over The Hills And Far Away', was pieced together from old seventies footage spliced together in a vaguely surreal montage, and actually dates from the early 90's when it was used to help promote the 'Remasters' box-set.

The second is another 1990 promo, this time of 'Travelling Riverside Blues', again pieced together from existing clips, including some lovely footage of Jimmy at home in his studio.

This glimpse of the music and the performance of four musicians who transported their gift from a small basement room in Chinatown, London, on to a wild rollercoaster ride through the clubs, festivals and stadiums of the world of pop culture is quite remarkable. It is a stirring and dynamic insight into a unique entity.

Mick Wall

Led Zeppelin DVD Essay 1

One of the most fascinating aspects of this DVD collection is that it captures, intimately for the first time, a band that famously fought shy of the cameras throughout its career. Despite the record-breaking tours and millions of albums sold, Led Zeppelin at their height and maintained an inaccessible relationship with the media. Few press photos, even fewer press interviews, and an almost allergic reaction to the idea of appearing on TV; they refused even to release singles in the UK.

Until now, the only official document of the live Led Zeppelin experience was the 1976 movie 'The Song Remains The Same', which featured clips of the band performing in New York in 1973. The idea for this DVD collection - the first official new Led Zeppelin visual material of any kind for over 25 years - was to try and rectify that; bequeathing something of real value to fans from that period, as well as allowing a whole new generation of people who weren't there first time around to get a chance to see what Led Zeppelin was really all about.

What a combined running time of over five hours, the shows that the bulk of the material comes from - Albert Hall 1970, Madison Square Garden 1973, Earls Court 1975, and Knebworth 1979 - were all, in their different ways, landmark occasions for Zeppelin: decisive moments in time that, sewn together like this, provide a compelling snapshot portrait of their career as a live band.

To see such scenes as the acoustic section of the show at Earls Court brought back to life with such vivid clarity is an astonishing experience; one made possible only recently with the arrival of modern digital technology. The Albert Hall footage, which was originally shot over 30 years ago using two 16mm film cameras, looks and sounds like it was recorded yesterday. It's the same with all the material, with the cumulative effect that the close-up footage from Knebworth, for example, is almost too real.

Starting with 132 cans of film negatives, two sets of two-inch videotape from the Earls Court and Knebworth shows, a small amount of bootleg material, plus a few clips of some of their earliest TV appearances, the resulting footage has turned up some incredible hidden gems. "It's been an epic project," says Jimmy Page, "and not without its frustrations. We really went through the vaults. People thought we had lots of stuff to choose from but we didn't. The main thing was to make the best of what we did have, with the added benefit now of technology way in advance of anything they thought back in the seventies."

Another interesting devide is the occasional, fluttering use of bootleg footage, juxtaposed against the vivid clarity of the new footage; specifically in the footage from Madison Square Garden in '73 and the Knebworth shows six years later. While not advocating bootlegs, the band felt it important not to limit themselves in what they could do. This broader view includes other incidental material on the menus giving the collection an almost documentary feel.

The Knebworth footage, for example, far exceeds what might have been possible had it ever been released as a straightforward concert film. Apart from the video recordings from the giant stage-screen that appeared behind them on the Knebworth stage, there is also some great stuff shot on isolated cameras from the audience interwoven into the official footage. The idea, as with all the concert footage is to try and give some feeling for what it was like to actually to be at those shows from as many different perspectives - literally, as many angles - as possible.

The whole process took almost a year to complete. Inevitably, there were some glitches along the wayl there was only one version of 'Achilles Last Stand' from Knebworth, for example. And the biting version of 'Heartbreaker' from the Albert Hall was missing the final reel, which is why only a snatch of the audio version is used as a backdrop on one of the sidebars.

Director Dick Carruthers - whose previous credits include working with The Who, the Rolling Stones and Oasis - describes the process as "like building a cathedral out of matchsticks." In order just to view the original two-inch video tapes from Ealrs Court and Knebworth, he says, "first we had to find a machine that could actually play them. Two-inch video tape is now an obsolete medium." Having finally located an old two-inch video-recorder that still played without chewing up everything up after a search that would take them to Singapore and back, the 25-year-old tapes were then put through a restoration process that included, bizarrely, baking them at 55 degrees for three weeks in a specially made 'oven'. The concern was that the tapes were so worn that if they didn't get it right they might actually finish up with no images at all.

Fortunately, the images they got back were "pretty astounding" although still not perfect, in places pockmarked by 'microphony' (those shaky lines that appear whenever the sound suddenly becomes louder), and 'chromableed' (where the colours appear to smudge). Digitaaly removing those faults alone became a painstaking process that would take over two months to complete.

Most difficult and time-consuming of all, however, was the process of transposing the original film from Madison Square Garden onto a digital format. Although they were able to locate all the original 1973 footage, including several thousand feet of film that was edited out of the final cut of 'The Song Remains The Same', when they came to look at the original film again they found it had worn so badly that most of it was now in ribbons. Working through it 20 cans at a time, roll by roll, it would eventually take six weeks just to put the four songs featured back together in the right sequence, let alone begin work on restoring them and synchronising the live soundtrack.

Ultimately, the aim was to try and stay as faithful to the original presentation as possible; and while a great deal of time and effort has gone into bringing this material back to life, nothing has been done to try and make the actual performances look or sound better than they did back then.

"We wanted something that would trace the jourbey of Led Zeppelin as a live band," says Page. "In that context, it's a truly historical document, that's the thing; something that's never been seen before."



LIVE AT THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL (1970)

By the time they walked on stage at The Royal Albert Hall on January 9, 1970, Led Zeppelin was barely a year old and already a full-blown phenomenon. The second Zeppelin album, released just three months before, had been No. 1 in both Britain and America and this was the third night of a seven-city British tour which marked their first live performances in two months.

Originally pro-shot on 16mm film for a BBC TV documentary, the Albert Hall performance is weighty, detailed and not a single note is thrown away. Zeppelin had played there the previous June, headlining a 'Pop Proms' night and they were 'England's hottest new band', according to 'Disc' magazine. Now they were something else again. Fame may have over-taken them but the band themselves don't appear to have fully caught up yet and what's most striking is the intimacy of the interaction between them on stage.

As Robert Plant observes, "People talk now about the bombast and the dexterity, and while they were key ingredients some of the most crucial elements in the performances were those indefinable moments inside the actual music. There was a feeling of reaching and stretching for something that wasn't quite so evident on the records. Playing live was the real jewel in our existance."

One of the most interesting sequences is watching the 21-year-old John Bonham perform his famous drum solo, 'Moby Dick'. There were other clips of Bonzo doing his solo, of course, but the Albert Hall performance is perhaps the most resonant; beautifully shot, the two cameras zooming in from variuos angles so that you feel like you're practically standing there next to him on stage. It's an exhilarating and unexpectedly poignant moment in an otherwise relentlessly powerhouse performance.



EXTRAS

Disc one also contains some remarkable extra material on the menu; from glimpses of the band in the dressing room at the Albert Hall to rare TV footage from their trip in June that year to Reykjavik, in Iceland. "I'd never seen the Icelandic material before," Plant says. "But I do remember it as an amazing experience." He recalls how the local student body got together to put the show on after the workers at the venue went on strike.

Another charming oddity is a 1969 black-and-white promo film for 'Communication Breakdown'; recently discovered footage featuring a very young Zeppelin proving they could mime with the best of them. Bonham stick-twirling to impressive effect while Jimmy gives it all he's got on the backing vocals.

Most fascinating of all, of course, are the handful of clips taken from various TV shows the band appeared on in their earliest days.

"We always felt very ambivalent about our appearances on TV," recalls Plant. "No matter how well you performed, you were always at the mercy of the in-house studio engineers, most of whom had no idea how to record a live band like us."

The version of 'Communication Breakdown' / 'Dazed And Confused' recorded for the French TV show 'Tous En Scene', in Paris, in June 1969, is a typically incongruous example. Beginning with a backstage shot of the band getting ready to go on, while they do well to battle against an ailing monitor system - Bonzo, in particular, putting up a tremendous fight - this French variety show was a bizarre setting for a group like Zeppelin, as evidenced by the straightlaced, middle-aged crowd.

"It's strange, yes," says Page, "but we wanted to show it because that's the reason we decided not to do any more TV after becoming disenchanted by the audio-cideo presentation that TV provided - so that suddenly makes it an important part of the story that shows why we went off in the direction we did."

The March 1969 footage of the band performance onDanish TV show 'TV-Byen'is the exception that proves the rule, however: shot in black-and-white, the band working their way with ease through a bristling four-song set in front of a small studio audience of mainly teenagers seated cross-legged on the floor; this is vintage stuff from a young band out to prove themselves.

As John Paul Jones observes,"Other big name groups released singles, therefore tey did a lot of television, but we didn't. In Denmark the radio wasn't very good and that TV show was about the only outlet they had. It was probably the one TV show we ever did that we really enjoyed."

The colour footage of 'Dazed And Confused' also featured in this section was originally recorded live the same month for a British TV show called 'Supershow'. Again, while it demonstrates the difficulties inherent in trying to convey the live Zeppelin experience in the ill-equipped TV studios of the day, the fact that the band still managed to make such a good fist of it makes fascinating viewing. After that though, it was decided: no more TV shows.

From now on Led Zeppelin would only be seen performing live on stage - or not at all.

Celebration Day

Celebration Day
[Click above for album images]

ed Zeppelin continue to spurn the reunion cash cow. Since John Bonham's untimely death convinced Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones to call it a day in 1980, the surviving band members have guarded their legacy with remarkable tact. They watched from the sidelines as legends both shameless (The Shadows) and stubborn (Rage Against The Machine) slowly succumbed to feverish fan pressure (no doubt pocketing huge payouts in the process). Zeppelin have reformed previously, but only for truly special occasions: in 1985 for Live Aid, for Atlantic Records 40th anniversary in ‘88, when they were inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in 1995, and of course, in 2007 when they headlined the O2 Arena to honour the death of Atlantic's founder, Ahmet Ertegun.

The event became legendary in its own right, establishing the fledging O2 Arena as London's premiere venue seemingly overnight. Tickets were distributed via a random draw; millions applied, 20,000 were selected. Fans ventured from every corner of the globe to descend on one concert, and the rest is history. The kind of history fans could only read about, as Led Zep refused to tour and decided to sit on the footage for five years. As such, Celebration Day hardly warrants a review. Millions of fans will be desperate to snag themselves a copy of this DVD/CD, and quality appears irrelevant when exclusivity cultivates demand. Still, Plant and Page's restraint warrants reprieve from cynicism, and Celebration Day deserves an honest critique.

Implausibly, the band appear to have progressed as a unit, in a wholly organic fashion. Despite being apart for the best part of 30 years Zeppelin have become imperious and stately. The blistering opening onslaught of "Good Times Bad Times", "Ramble On", and "Black Dog" dismiss any fears of decrepit embarrassment, as each member appears sharp and on point. In isolation they've grown according to expectation.

Page has calmed. His playing is less visceral and more weighty (perhaps the result of a hand injury he was recovering from). He appears too cool for school and it suits him. In 2007 Plant was on the verge of releasing Raising Sand with Allison Krauss, an album that would give his career new direction and renewed acclaim. His screams are no longer feral, he instead acts his age: a natural and accomplished crowd pleaser who has moved on from psychedelic screams and embraced a more down to earth rustic approach. John Paul Jones appears locked in. Still a rocker and professional, watching Celebration Day it is unsurprising that two years later he'd create Them Crooked Vultures alongside Dave Grohl and Josh Homme. Then there's John Bonham. The one member of the band who it was hardest to imagine growing old, tragically didn't. His son Jason fills in admirably, adding plenty of kick to "Black Dog" and doing his dad proud on "Rock and Roll" (Page looks genuinely bewildered observing the ferocious final solo).

For a concert film, the crowd are too reverent and respectful. Tears are shed and hands are raised, but they rarely engage, and it detracts from the moment. The atmosphere can at times feel too clean, lacking the intensity that a true spectacle needs (although the director endeavours to simulate wild energy with quick cuts). This isn't an issue on the audio only version; the sound is staggeringly crisp, even during the fastest interchanges. We'll happily give Jimmy the benefit of the doubt, but at times the sound is so sublime it's suspicious - the balance is too perfect. The end result is a series of crystalline recordings that truly benefit the gorgeous sprawl of "No Quarter" and the rambunctious thrills of "Nobody's Fault But Mine", but only serve to further sterilize "Stairway To Heaven". Despite being punctuated by some phenomenal playing, the mid portion of the set becomes bogged down by extended jams, causing pacing issues. The setlist is brilliantly chosen, but could have been more engagingly arranged.

By the time "The Song Remains The Same" and "Misty Mountain Hop" roll around these criticisms are long forgotten, as Zeppelin's sheer force blows away any lingering lag. Plant never truly let's rip, instead he coaxes the crowd through a setlist full of classics, leading to a warm and loving rendition of "Whole Lotta Love". It's not a 70s style crazy reinvention; it ticks like clockwork, and after all these years it's great to hear them play it straight. In the 21st century Plant, Page, and JPJ are comfortable in their own skin. They've moved on - evolved. They'll never be the wild world changing kids they once were, but they are clearly having a whale of a time, and when they wheel "Rock and Roll" out of retirement at the set's close, they still feel like the greatest hard rock band of all time.

-http://www.guitarplanet.eu/album-reviews/led-zeppelin-celebration-day.html
Statistics

Released:
Nov. 19, 2012

Chart Position:

Certified:
Gold Feb. 24, 2014
Multi Platinum 3x Feb. 24, 2014

Length:
124 mins.

Tracks

1. Good Times Bad Times
2. Ramble On
3. Black Dog
4. In My Time Of Dying
5. For Your Life
6. Trampled Under Foot
7. Nobody Fault But Mine
8. No Quarter

9. Since I've Been Loving You
10. Dazed And Confused
11. Stairway To Heaven
12. The Song Remains The Same
13. Misty Mountain Hop
14. Kashmir
15. Whole Lotta Love
16. Rock And Roll

17. Shepperton rehearsals
18. BBC Footage
Quick Fact

Backdrop screen animations were created by Thinkfarm.

Led Zeppelin DVD More Info

Led Zeppelin DVD LED ZEPPELIN
Vocals and Harmonica: Robert Plant
Acoustic and Electric Guitars: Jimmy Page
Bass Guitar, Keyboards and Mandolin: John Paul Jones
Drums and Percussion: John Bonham

DVD ONE
Live At The Royal Albert Hall - January 9, 1970 102:00
We're Gonna Groove
I Can't Quit You Baby
Dazed And Confused
White Summer
What Is And What Should Never Be
How Many More Times
Moby Dick
Whole Lotta Love
Communication Breakdown
C''mon Everybody
Something Else
Bring It On Home

2. Communication Breakdown Promo - March 14, 1969 2:24

3. Danmarks Radio - March 17, 1969 7:25
Communication Breakdown
Dazed And Confused
Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
How Many More Times

4. Supershow - March 25, 1969 7:31
Dazed And Confused

5. Tous En Scene - June 19, 1969 5:08
Communication Breakdown
Dazed And Confused

DVD TWO
1. Immigrant Song - February 27, 1972 4:03

2. Madison Square Garden - July 27, 28, 29, 1973 23:24
Black Dog
Misty Mountain Hop
Since I've Been Loving You
The Ocean

3. Earls Court - May 23, 24, 25, 1975 49:00
Going To California
That's The Way
Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp
In My Time Of Dying
Trampled Underfoot
Stairway To Heaven

4. Knebworth - August 04, 1979 50:11
Rock And Roll
Nobody's Fault But Mine
Sick Again
Achilles Last Stand
In The Evening
Kashmir
Whole Lotta Love

6. NYC Press Conference - September 18, 1970 3:27

7. Down Under - 1972 5:17
Rock And Roll - February 27, 1972
Interviews With The Band - February 27, 1972

8. The Old Grey Whistle Test - January 12, 1975 3:47
Robert Plant Interview

9. Promo 1 - October 1990 4:49
Over The Hills And Far Away

10. Promo 2 - October 1990 4:12
Travelling Riverside Blues

Total Length: 320:00

Led Zeppelin DVD

Led Zeppelin
[Click above for album images]

With the help of Dick Caruthers, band member Jimmy Page produced this DVD package. A feast for the eyes and ears, this excellent package captures the evolution of the band and brings together footage of Zeppelin playing live and on television, all of it previously unreleased. The set consists primarily of excerpts from four well-known Zeppelin concerts. It also includes eight live performances from other sources and a few interview clips.

The first (and best) segment of the two-disc set is an entire Zeppelin concert from 1970 at the Royal Albert Hall, which comprises most of the first disc. The band, barely a year old at that time, had just released its second album, Led Zeppelin II.

Seeing and hearing the early Zeppelin perform on stage, I finally understand why the band so deserved its name. Playing together, guitarist Jimmy Page, vocalist Robert Plant, drummer John Bonham and bassist John Paul Jones were heavy like metal but nimble enough to fly like a blimp. The live versions of "We're Gonna Groove," "Communication Breakdown," "Bring It On Home," "Dazed and Confused," and "What Is and What Should Never Be" simply blow the studio versions away. Metal truly was born on the backs of this band, and this collection, especially the RAH concert, makes that clear. The power and complexity of these performances is so overwhelming that it becomes difficult to believe there are only four performers.

The second disc includes a four-song sequence culled from the same 1973 Madison Square Garden performances that served as the source for The Song Remains The Same. However, none of the footage here appeared in that film. Shot in 35 millimeter, these performances look and sound much more polished than those from the Royal Albert Hall show, and by '73, the frumpy, hippie clothes worn by the band in '69 had given way to flashy embroidered shirts and flared pants. The band had moved away from its roots as pure interpreters of the blues and moved into its prime as the leading progenitors of the bigger-than-huge sound of heavy metal.

Thankfully, the Madison Square Garden clips on Led Zeppelin DVD are not disrupted by the fictional vignettes that marred The Song Remains The Same, and the focus remains on the band's performances. Here, a masterfully edited clip of "Misty Mountain Hop," powered by John Paul Jones' melodic organ work, artfully exposes the high level of communication between the band members. During "The Ocean," Page displays total control of his instrument and complete command of the stage as he trades funky licks with Bonham, who, surprisingly, grabs a microphone to harmonize with Plant.

Nearly an hour of footage of Zeppelin's headlining performance at Knebworth in 1979 rounds out the two DVD set. Here, the band sounds and looks even more polished than in the mid-'70s. Adjusting to the ascendancy of New Wave, Zeppelin makes use of synthesizers and wears clean-cut clothing, looking almost like a bunch of preppies. In certain respects, by this time the group has lost its bite, sounding almost tired as it plays hits from years before. On the other hand, the energy of the massive crowd at Knebworth and the Zeppelin's forcefulness on certain excellent tracks cuts through the band's new, slick facade. Second only to "Stairway to Heaven" in its distinctiveness, significance, and influence, the Eastern-tinged epic "Kashmir" here becomes even more mystical than on record. During "Whole Lotta Love," Plant engages in a deafening call-and-response with the hundreds of thousands in attendance; slick maybe, past their prime, no.

Visually, the Knebworth footage is most striking in that the band is captured by a number of cameras, from every conceivable angle. Page and Caruthers create a neat effect by toggling between grainy footage of the concert shot by fans in the crowd and the crisp footage that was projected on a giant screen behind the band as it played. At the end of the Knebworth concert, after singing "Whole Lotta Love," Plant thanks the crowd for its eleven years of support, as if he was about to announce the demise of the band, the end of its evolution. He was unaware, of course, that the band would indeed dissolve little more than a year later, as a result of Bonham's untimely death.

Led Zeppelin DVD seems to be another way that the band is thanking its fans. As Page commented recently, Zeppelin was never much of a pop band: it was despised by critics, rarely released singles, and nearly never appeared on TV. Plant, Page, Jones, and Bonham focused on cutting albums and playing live for their fans. More than five hours of great performance footage, this new set is a gift to those fans, one that lets them see and hear what Zeppelin was all about. - PopMatters
Statistics

Released:
May 27, 2003 (US)
May 26, 2003 (UK)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold 05-26-03
Multi Platinum 13x 07-09-12

Length:
138 mins. (US) 132 mins. (UK)

Tracks

Royal Albert Hall-1970
• We're Gonna Groove
• I Can't Quit You Baby
• Dazed And Confused
• White Summer
• What Is And What Should Never Be
• How Many More Times
• Moby Dick
• Whole Lotta Love
• Communication Breakdown
• C''mon Everybody
• Something Else
• Bring It On Home

Communication Breakdown-1969

Danmarks Radio-1969

• Communication Breakdown
• Dazed And Confused
• Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
• How Many More Times

Supershow-1969
• Dazed And Confused

Tous En Scene-1969
• Communication Breakdown
• Dazed And Confused


DVD TWO
Immigrant Song-1972

Madison Square Garden-1973
• Black Dog
• Misty Mountain Hop
• Since I've Been Loving You
• The Ocean

Earl's Court-1975
• Going To California
• That's The Way
• Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp
• In My Time Of Dying
• Trampled Underfoot
• Stairway To Heaven

Knebworth-1979
• Rock And Roll
• Nobody's Fault But Mine
• Sick Again
• Achilles Last Stand
• In The Evening
• Kashmir
• Whole Lotta Love

NYC Press Conference-1970

Down Under-1972
• Rock And Roll
• Interviews

The Old Grey Whistle Test-1975
• Robert Plant Interview

Promo 1-1990
• Over The Hills And Far Away

Promo 2-1990
• Travelling Riverside Blues


Quick Fact

Producer Kevin Shirley said that some of the source tapes needed a bit of work physically done to them so that they would be able to be read by tape machines.

"We had to bake all these tapes in an oven because some of them had moisture in them," Shirley continues, "which turns the glue that bonds the oxide to the tape into a sort of jelly. When you play a tape like that back, the oxide will scrape off and stick to the tape head. So you can destroy the tape just by playing it. Through baking at about 55°C you get the moisture out and the tapes are playable again, at least for a while. The first playback is usually the most stable. But it takes about 60 hours to bake each tape, so immediately we were weeks behind while we waited for the tapes to be baked."

The Song Remains The Same More Info

The Song Remains The Same film THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion
John Paul Jones: Bass, Electric Piano, Mellotron

1. Mob Rubout
2. Big Apple Credits
3. Country Life (Autumn Lake)
4. New York (Bron-Yr-Aur)
5. Rock And Roll
6. Black Dog
7. Since I've Been Loving You
8. No Quarter
9. Who's Responsible?
10. The Song Remains The Same
11. The Rain Song Begins
12. Fire And Sword
13. Capturing The Castle
14. Not-Quit-Backstage Pass
15. Dazed And Confused Begins
16. Strung Out
17. Magic In The Night
18. Dazed And Confused Continues
19. Gate Crasher
20. Dazed And Confused Concludes
21. No Comment
22. Stairway To Heaven
23. Moby Dick; Country Squitre Bonham
24. Heartbreaker; Grand Theft
25. Whole Lotta Love
26. End Credits And Exit Music

1976 Length: 137:00
2008 Length: 193:03

Filmed on July 23, 1973 at Baltimore, MD, July 24, 1973 at Pittsburgh, PA, July 27-29, 1973 at Madison Square Garden, New York, New York and August 1974 at Shepperton Studios, London, England.

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Clifton, Joe Massot

Program Content ©1976 Swan Song Inc. Artwork & Photography ©1976 Warner Bros. Package Design & Summary ©1991, 1999 & 2007 Warner Home Video Inc.

The Song Remains The Same Cover Images

1984 UK VHS Cover

The Song Remains The Same 1984 UK VHS Cover

1991 US VHS Cover

The Song Remains The Same 1991 US VHS Cover

1999 DVD Cover

The Song Remains The Same 1999 DVD Cover

2007 DVD Cover

The Song Remains The Same 2007 DVD Cover

The Song Remains The Same

The Song Remains The Same
[Click above for album images]

Led Zeppelin was no stranger to the camera. In March 1969, they were in front of the camera no less than 3 times. In January 1970, they funded the Royal Albert Hall performance to be filmed. Although nothing came out of it at the time but a bootleg video, the footage was included in 2003's DVD. Other filming was done in 1971 and 1972 in Australia.

In May 1973, Joe Massot approached Peter Grant about filming the band. Grant turned him down but took him back up on the offer mid-July 1973. Two band was filing on and off the stage from July 23 through July 29, 1973. Additional filming was set for 1975/1976 but Robert Plant's accident prevented that.

The Song Remains The Same premiered in US theaters on October 21, 1976 and British theaters on November 5, 1976. Many theaters were packed thereafter with midnight showings. It was released in the UK on VHS in 1984 and followed by the US in 1991.

In 1999, the long-awaited DVD was released in the US. It, however, didnt contain any additional footage, so the release wasn't extremely noteworthy.

A re-release, dubbed "Remastered/Expanded" was released on November 19 (UK) and November 20 (US), 2007. It includes more than 40 minutes of added bonus material, including never-before-released performance footage of Over the Hills and Far Away and Celebration Day, plus performances of Misty Mountain Hop and The Ocean, a rare 1976 BBC interview with Robert Plant and Peter Grant, vintage TV footage from the Drake Hotel robbery during the New York concert stand, and a Cameron Crowe radio show.
Statistics

Released:
Jul. 1, 1991 (VHS-US)
c. 1984 (UK)
Dec. 31, 1999 (DVD-US)
June 5, 2000 (DVD-UK)
November 19, 2007 (DVD Re-release UK)
November 20, 2007 (DVD Re-release US)

Length:
138 mins. (US) 132 mins. (UK)

Tracks

1. Mob Rubout
2. Big Apple Credits
3. Country Life (Autumn Lake)
4. New York (Bron-Yr-Aur)
5. Rock And Roll
6. Black Dog
7. Since I've Been Loving You
8. No Quarter
9. Who's Responsible?
10. The Song Remains The Same
11. The Rain Song Begins
12. Fire And Sword
13. Capturing The Castle
14. Not-Quit-Backstage Pass
15. Dazed And Confused Begins
16. Strung Out
17. Magic In The Night
18. Dazed And Confused Continues
19. Gate Crasher
20. Dazed And Confused Concludes
21. No Comment
22. Stairway To Heaven
23. Moby Dick; Country Squire Bonham
24. Heartbreaker; Grand Theft
25. Whole Lotta Love
26. End Credits And Exit Music
Quick Fact

Although the bulk of the movie was filmed on July 27-29, 1973, filming began four days earlier in Baltimore, MD. The section where Peter Grant blasts the promoter for selling pirated posters was filmed that night.

Led Zeppelin Interview (2003)

Led Zeppelin Interview (2003)

Released:
2003

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 301150

This interview-only disc was released in conjunction with the May 2003 release of How The West Was Won.

1. This Is Led Zeppelin
2. This Is Led Zeppelin
3. This Is Led Zeppelin
4. This Is Led Zeppelin
5. This Is Led Zeppelin
6. Making These Projects Happen
7. Making These Projects Happen
8. Making These Projects Happen
9. Making These Projects Happen
10. Making These Projects Happen
11. 5.1 Surround Sound
12. 5.1 Surround Sound
13. 5.1 Surround Sound
14. Watching It Come Together
15. Watching It Come Together
16. Watching It Come Together
17. Watching It Come Together
18. Watching It Come Together
19. Dvd - The Early Films - Denmark, France, Australia, Supershow
20. Dvd - The Early Films - Denmark, France, Australia, Supershow
21. Dvd - The Early Films - Denmark, France, Australia, Supershow
22. Dvd - The Early Films - Denmark, France, Australia, Supershow
23. Dvd - The Early Films - Denmark, France, Australia, Supershow
24. Dvd - The Early Films - Denmark, France, Australia, Supershow
25. Remembering John Bonham
26. Remembering John Bonham
27. Remembering John Bonham
28. Dvd - The Royal Albert Hall 1969
29. Dvd - The Royal Albert Hall 1969
30. Dvd - The Royal Albert Hall 1969
31. Dvd - The Royal Albert Hall 1969
32. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
33. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
34. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
35. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
36. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
37. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
38. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
39. Cd - How The West Was Won - LA & Long Beach 1972
40. Dvd - Madison Square Garden 1973
41. Dvd - Madison Square Garden 1973
42. Dvd - Madison Square Garden 1973
43. Dvd - Earls Court 1975 And Knebworth 1979
44. Dvd - Earls Court 1975 And Knebworth 1979
45. Dvd - Earls Court 1975 And Knebworth 1979
46. Dvd - Earls Court 1975 And Knebworth 1979
47. Dvd - Earls Court 1975 And Knebworth 1979
48. Zeppelin On Tour
49. Zeppelin On Tour
50. Zeppelin On Tour
51. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
52. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
53. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
54. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
55. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
56. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
57. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
58. The Songs Remain The Same...or Do They
59. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
60. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
61. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
62. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
63. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
64. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
65. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
66. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
67. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
68. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
69. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
70. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
71. Parting Thoughts On The Projects
72. Liners
73. Liners
74. Liners
75. Liners
76. Liners
77. Liners
78. Liners
79. Liners
80. Liners
81. Liners

The Girl I Love (1997)

The Girl I Love (1997)

Released:
September 1997

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 8376-2

This promo CD was released in conjunction with the November 1997 release of BBC Sessions.

Communication Breakdown (1997)

Communication Breakdown (1997)

Released:
September 1997

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 8402-2

This 3-track sampler promo CD was released in conjunction with the November 1997 release of BBC Sessions.

BBC Sessions (1997)

BBC Sessions (1997)

Released:
September 1997

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 8401-2

This 9-track sampler promo CD was released in conjunction with the November 1997 release of BBC Sessions.

Tracks

1. Good Times Bad Times
2. Whole Lotta Led Historical Medley: Led Zep I/Led Zep II/Led Zep III/Led Zep IV/Houses Of The Holy/Physical Graffiti/Presence/In Through The Out Door

Baby Come On Home (1993)

Baby Come On Home (1993)

Released:
September 1993

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 5255-2

This promo CD was released to promote the September 1993 release of The Complete Studio Recordings.

Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)

Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)

Released:
1992

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 4424-2

In 1970, the members of Led Zeppelin - Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, and John Bonham - gathered at Headley Grange, a converted poorhouse in Hampshire, England, to begin recording their next album. One night, they started work on a new song...

Page recalls: "Bonzo (Bonham) and Robert had gone out for the night, and I worked really hard on the thing. Jonesy and I then routined it together... Later, we ran through it with the drums. Robert was sitting there by the fireplace just writing away, and suddenly there it was...

Plant picks up the story: "It was done very quickly. It was a very fluid, unnaturally easy track. There was something pushing it, saying 'You guys are okay, but if you want to do something timeless, here's a wedding song for you.'"

The song was Stairway To Heaven, and as Page once noted, it was the song which "crystallized the essence of the band." The final, eight-minute version was recorded at Island Studios in London, and released November 8, 1971 on the untitled fourth Zeppelin album. Never edited and never released as a single, it nevertheless went on to become the most played song in the history of rock radio.

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Stairway To Heaven, we are pleased to present you with this very limited, promotional-only edition. Twenty years on, the song remains the same - a magical moment in the history of rock and roll music.

This features a rare CD single and 45 vinyl single (double-sided) of Stairway To Heaven.

The cardboard folder contains popup hermit figure and storysheet.

Photos

Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)
Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)
Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)
Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)
Stairway To Heaven 20th Anniversary (1992)
 

Travelling Riverside Blues (1990)

Travelling Riverside Blues (1990)

Released:
October 1990

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 3627-2

Directed by Aubrey Powell, this video, along with the Over The Hills And Far Away promo was released to promote the 1990 Led Zeppelin boxed set release. This video contains footage from The Song Remains The Same, as well as outtakes from the film, Seattle '77 and 1973 studio footage.

Video

Over The HIlls And Far Away (1990)

Over The Hills And Far Away (1990)

Released:
October 1990

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 8376-2

Directed by Aubrey Powell, this video, along with the Travelling Riverside Blues promo was released to promote the 1990 Led Zeppelin boxed set release. This video contains footage from Danish TV, The Song Remains The Same, Seattle '77 and Knebworth.

Video

Profiled (1990)

Profiled (1990)

Released:
September 21, 1990

Catalog #:
Atlantic PRCD 3629-2

Profiled is a promo-only 43-track interview CD made to accompany the 1990 Led Zeppelin boxed set release. It was later bundled with the special edition Remasters.

Singles

US Singles
Good Times Bad Times / Communication Breakdown
Catalog #45-2613
Released Mar. 10, 1969 (US)
A. Good Times Bad Times 2:43 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
B. Communication Breakdown 2:26 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
 
Whole Lotta Love / Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman)
Catalog #45-2690
Released Nov. 7, 1969 (US)
A. Whole Lotta Love 5:33 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
B. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) 2:40 (Page/Plant)
 
Immigrant Song / Hey Hey What Can I Do
Catalog #45-2777
Released Nov. 5, 1970
A. Immigrant Song 2:21 (Page/Plant)
B. Hey Hey What Can I Do 3:53 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
 
Black Dog / Misty Mountain Hop
Catalog #45-2849
Released Dec. 2, 1971
A. Black Dog 4:55 (Page/Plant/Jones)
B. Misty Mountain Hop 4:39 (Page/Plant/Jones)
 
Rock And Roll / Four Sticks
Catalog #2865
Released Feb. 21, 1972
A. Rock And Roll 3:40 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
B. Four Sticks 4:42 (Page/Plant)
 
Over The Hills And Far Away / Dancing Days
Catalog #45-2970
Released May 24, 1973
A. Over The Hills And Far Away 4:42 (Page/Plant)
B. Dancing Days 3:40 (Page/Plant)
 
D'yer Mak'er / The Crunge
Catalog #45-2986
Released Sep. 17, 1973
A. D'yer Mak'er 4:19 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
B. The Crunge 3:10 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
 
Trampled Underfoot / Black Country Woman
Catalog #SS-70102
Released Apr. 2, 1975
A. Trampled Underfoot 5:38 (page/Plant/Jones)
B. Black Country Woman 4:30 (Page/Plant)
 
Candy Store Rock / Royal Orleans
Catalog #SS-70110
Released Jun. 18, 1976
A. Candy Store Rock 4:10 (Page/Plant)
B. Royal Orleans 2:58
 
Fool In The Rain / Hot Dog
Catalog #SS-71003
Released Dec. 7, 1979
A. Fool In The Rain 6:08 (Page/Plant/Jones)
B. Hot Dog 3:15 (Page/Plant)
 
Whole Lotta Love
Catalog #7567-84014-6
Released Aug. 29, 1997
1. Whole Lotta Love (edit) 4:50 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Willie Dixon)
2. Baby Come On Home 4:29 (Bert Burns/Page/Plant)
3. Travelling Riverside Blues 5:09 (Page/Plant/Robert Johnson)

Definitive Collection Mini LP Replica CD Boxset More Info

John Bonham: drums, timpani, backing vocals
John Paul Jones: bass guitar, organ, keyboards, backing vocals, synthesizer, mandolin, recorders, harpsichord, Mellotron
Jimmy Page: acoustic, electric, and pedal steel guitar, backing vocals, banjo, mandolin, theremin, production
Robert Plant: lead vocals, harmonica, acoustic guitar on Boogie with Stu

Sandy Denny: vocals on The Battle of Evermore
Viram Jasani: tabla on Black Mountain Side
Ian Stewart: piano on Rock and Roll and Boogie with Stu

CD ONE
Led Zeppelin

CD TWO
Led Zeppelin II

CD THREE
Led Zeppelin III

CD FOUR


CD FIVE
Houses Of The Holy

CD SIX & SEVEN
Physical Graffiti

CD EIGHT
Presence

CD NINE & TEN
The Song Remains The Same

CD ELEVEN
In Through The Out Door

CD TWELVE
Coda
1. Baby Come On Home 4:29 (Page/Plant/Bert Berns)
Recorded on October 10, 1968 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by Glyn Johns. Mixed at Atlantic Studios, November 1992 by Mike Fraser.

2. Travelling Riverside Blues 5:09 (Page/Plant/Robert Johnson)
Recorded and broadcast on June 23, 1969 for the "John Peel's Top Gear" radio show. Produced by Joh Walters for the BBC. Released by arrangement with BBC Enterprises, Ltd.

3. White Summer/Black Mountain Side 8:01 (Page)
Recorded and broadcast live on June 27, 1969 at London's Playhouse Theatre for the "Playhouse Theatre Over Radio One" show. Produced by Jeff Griffin for the BBC. Engineered by Tony Wilson. Released by arrangement with BBC Enterprises, Ltd.

4. Hey Hey What Can I Do 3:56 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in July 1970 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed at Island Studios with Andy Johns.

Length: 568:05

Peter Grant: Executive Producer on original recordings

John Walters: Producer (''Travelling Riverside Blues")

Jeff Griffin: Producer (''White Summer/Black Mountain Side")

John C. F. Davis: Remastering

Eric Spillman: Art Direction and Design

Eric Altenburger: Art Direction and Design

Richard Bates: Art Direction and Design

Ross Halfin: Photography Research

Chuck Boyd: Photography

Richard Creamer: Photography

Jim Cummins: Photography

Chris Dreja: Photography (Led Zeppelin)

Elliott Erwitt: Photography (Physical Graffiti)

BP Fallon: Photography (Physical Graffiti)

Jim Marshall: Photography

Mike Mayer: Photography

Barry Plummer: Photography

Neal Preston: Photography

Michael Putland: Photography

Jay Thompson: Photography

Neil Zlozower: Photography

Maurice Tate: Photo Tinting (Physical Graffiti)

Barrington Colby: Illustrations (Untitled)

Dave Heffernan: Illustrations (Physical Graffiti)

George Hardie: Packaging and Design (Led Zeppelin, Presence)

David Juniper: Packaging and Design (Led Zeppelin II)

Zacron: Packaging and Design (Led Zeppelin III)

Graphreaks: Packaging and Design (Untitled)

Hipgnosis: Packaging and Design (Houses of the Holy, Presence, In Through the Out Door, and Coda)

Mike Doud: Packaging and Design (Physical Graffiti)

Peter Corriston: Packaging and Design (Physical Graffiti)

Cameron Crowe: Liner Notes

Definitive Collection Mini LP Replica CD Boxset

Definitive Collection Mini LP Replica CD Boxset
[Click above for album images]

Definitive Collection Mini LP Replica CD Boxset is a twelve compact disc box set by English rock group Led Zeppelin, released by Atlantic Records in conjunction with Rhino Entertainment on 4 November 2008. It contains all nine of the original Led Zeppelin studio albums digitally remastered, with the inclusion of previously unreleased tracks that had surfaced on the Box Set series, on Disc 12, as well as the two disc remastered edition of the film soundtrack The Song Remains The Same, which also includes bonus tracks. The albums are placed in chronological order all with miniature replica sleeves of the original vinyl releases. Previous to this box set, these replica CDs were only available as individual releases from Japan. A Japanese deluxe box-set was made available initially from 10 September 2008, limited to 5,000 copies on SHM-CD format.

The miniature replica sleeves have made all efforts possible to preserve the original artwork and functionality of the original vinyl releases. As such, the sleeves and CD labels only list what songs were originally released, omitting the bonus tracks from the packaging.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Definitive_Collection_Mini_LP_Replica_CD_Boxset
Statistics

Released:
Nov. 4, 2008 (US)
Sept. 10, 2008 (Japan)

Chart Position:
#23 (Japan)

Tracks

CD ONE
Led Zeppelin

CD TWO
Led Zeppelin II

CD THREE
Led Zeppelin III

CD FOUR


CD FIVE
Houses Of The Holy

CD SIX & SEVEN
Physical Graffiti

CD EIGHT
Presence

CD NINE & TEN
The Song Remains The Same

CD ELEVEN
In Through The Out Door

CD TWELVE
Coda
9. Baby Come On Home
10. Travelling Riverside Blues
11. White Summer/Black Mountain Side
12. Hey Hey What Can I Do
Quick Fact

The sleeves included in the boxed set feature the original LP album artwork released in the U.K., including the original printing of the group's debut, which used turquoise ink on the cover for the band's name and the Atlantic Records logo. Later printings used orange ink, making the first a rare collector's item. The orange sleeve is included with the boxed set as a bonus.

Mothership

Mothership
[Click above for album images]

For years, as playlists and multidisc players put Led Zeppelin tracks into a mix, there was a perpetual need to adjust the volume when Zep came on. Their tunes languished in the haze of substandard remastering--until now, at least for the 24 tracks on Mothership and the final fullness of the new Song Remains the Same reissue. For its part, Mothership's crisper, warmer audio owes its heft to the troika of Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, who helped oversee the mastering, bringing out untold shades even in the throes of Heartbreaker and the sinews of No Quarter. It's an impressive sonic leap. Where tinny high-ends and muffled lows used to co-exist, fatter and louder depths prevail. It's ever more astonishing that Zep got on with just four blokes. You can quibble with the 24 tracks here (where's The Ocean?), but the band picked each track here, from the stone-cold locks (Communication Breakdown and Stairway to Heaven, no, duh) to the robust throb of When the Levee Breaks. As for The Ocean, you can find that in fantastically full form, along with five other gems on the newly remastered The Song Remains The Same, which shows up for 2007's holiday season on DVD, too. Only rarely have four lads from England made so memorable an auditory and visual blast. --Andrew Bartlett
Statistics

Released:
Nov. 13, 2007 (US)
Nov. 12, 2007 (UK)

Chart Position:
#7 (US) #4 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 2-07-2008
Platinum: 2x 02-07-2008

Tracks

CD ONE
1. Good Times Bad Times
2. Communication Breakdown
3. Dazed And Confused
4. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
5. Whole Lotta Love
6. Ramble On
7. Heartbreaker
8. Immigrant Song
9. Since I've Been Loving You
10. Rock And Roll
11. Black Dog
12. When The Levee Breaks
13. Stairway To Heaven

CD TWO
1. The Song Remains The Same
2. Over The Hills And Far Away
3. D'Yer Mak'er
4. No Quarter
5. Trampled Under Foot
6. Houses Of The Holy
7. Kashmir
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine
9. Achilles Last Stand
10. In The Evening
11. All My Love
Quick Fact

The Bonus DVD included in the Limited 2CD/1DVD Edition is a scaled-down version of 2003's DVD, including 9 songs from the 1970 Royal Albert Hall show, 4 songs from The Song Remains the Same, 3 songs from the 1975 Earls Court show, and 4 songs from the 1979 Knebworth show.

Early Days & Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin More Info

Early Days & Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin EARLY DAYS & LATTER DAYS: BEST OF LED ZEPPELIN
Atlantic 83619-2 (US) / Atlantic 7567-83619-2 (UK)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Sub Octivider, Acoustic Guitar, Electronic Treatments
Robert Plant: Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Drum Orchestra
John Paul Jones: Bass, Keyboards, Piano

Disc One
1. Good Times Bad Times 2:43 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You 6:40 (Anne Bredon/Page/Plant)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

3. Dazed And Confused 6:27 (Page)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

4. Communication Breakdown 2:26 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

5. Whole Lotta Love 5:33 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Willie Dixon)
Recorded in May 4-6, 1969 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles & June 1969, Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz.

6. What Is And What Should Never Be 4:47 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in June 1969 at Groove Studios, New York & June 1969, Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz.

7. Immigrant Song 2:26 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.

8. Since I've Been Loving You 7:24 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.

9. Black Dog 4:54 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

10. Rock And Roll 3:41 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios and Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

11. The Battle Of Evermore 5:52 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed at Olympic Studios with George Chkiantz.

12. When The Levee Breaks 7:08 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Memphis Minnie)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns.

13. Stairway To Heaven 8:02 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

Artwork/Design: Andie Airfix at Satori
Cover concept and photographic research: Ross Halfin
Front Cover illustration based on an original collage by M. Dubra in 'salut les Copains'

Disc Two
1. The Song Remains The Same 5:24 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios with Keith Harwood.

2. No Quarter 6:57 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in May 1972 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

3. Houses Of The Holy 4:01 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz. Mixdown in June 1972 by Eddie Kramer at Electric Lady, New York.

4. Trampled Underfoot 5:38 (Page/Plant/Jones)Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

5. Kashmir 8:31 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

6. Ten Years Gone 6:55 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

7. Achilles Last Stand 10:26 (Page/Plant)
Recorded and mixed on Nov. 9-27, 1975 at Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany. Engineered and mixed by Keith Harwood.

8. Nobody's Fault But Mine 6:15 (Page/Plant)
Recorded and mixed on Nov. 9-27, 1975 at Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany. Engineered and mixed by Keith Harwood.

9. All My Love 5:51 (Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Nov./Dec. 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden. Engineered by Leif Masses.

10. In The Evening 6:48 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Nov./Dec. 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden. Engineered by Leif Masses.

Length: 132:45

Artwork/Design: Andie Airfix at Satori
Cover concept and photographic research: Ross Halfin
Front Cover illustration based on an original collage by M. Dubra in 'Salut les Copains'

Early Days & Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin

Early Days & Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin
[Click above for album images]

EARLY DAYS & LATTER DAYS: BEST OF LED ZEPPELIN

This special two-disc set captures the legendary power of Led Zeppelin's finest moments in a collection of 23 classic tracks selected by Jimmy Page himself. As if that weren't enough, Early Days Volume One includes a never-before-heard live version of Communication Breakdown recorded circa 1969. Latter Days Volume two is enhanced with never-before-seen performance footage of Kashmir filmed at London's Earl Court back in 1975.
Statistics

Released:
Nov. 19, 2002 (US)
Nov. 19, 2002 (UK)

Chart Position:
#114 (US) #11 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 4-19-2004
Platinum: 4-19-2004

Tracks

CD ONE
1. Good Times, Bad Times
2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
3. Dazed And Confused
4. Communication Breakdown
5. Whole Lotta Love
6. What Is And What Should Never Be
7. Immigrant Song
8. Since I've Been Loving You
9. Black Dog
10. Rock And Roll
11. The Battle Of Evermore
12. When The Levee Breaks
13. Stairway To Heaven

CD TWO
1. The Song Remains The Same
2. No Quarter
3. Houses Of The Holy
4. Trampled Underfoot
5. Kashmir
6. Ten Years Gone
7. Achillies Last Stand
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine
9. All My Love
10. In The Evening
Quick Fact

In the Japanese edition, each disc is housed in a miniature LP paper sleeve, with lyrics accompanying the liner notes booklet. (Citizendum)

Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume Two More Info

Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin, Volume Two LATTER DAYS: BEST OF LED ZEPPELIN, VOLUME TWO
Atlantic 7567832782
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Sub Octivider, Acoustic Guitar, Electronic Treatments
Robert Plant: Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Drum Orchestra
John Paul Jones: Bass, Keyboards, Piano

1. The Song Remains The Same 5:24 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios with Keith Harwood.

2. No Quarter 6:57 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in May 1972 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
3. Houses Of The Holy 4:01 (Page/Plant)Recorded in May 1972 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz. Mixdown in June 1972 by Eddie Kramer at Electric Lady, New York.

4. Trampled Underfoot 5:38 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

5. Kashmir 8:31 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

6. Ten Years Gone 6:55 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

7. Achilles Last Stand 10:26 (Page/Plant)
Recorded and mixed on Nov. 9-27, 1975 at Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany. Engineered and mixed by Keith Harwood.

8. Nobody's Fault But Mine 6:15 (Page/Plant)
Recorded and mixed on Nov. 9-27, 1975 at Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany. Engineered and mixed by Keith Harwood.

9. All My Love 5:51 (Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Nov./Dec. 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden. Engineered by Leif Masses.

10. In The Evening 6:48 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Nov./Dec. 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden. Engineered by Leif Masses.

Length: 64:36

Artwork/Design: Andie Airfix at Satori
Cover concept and photographic research: Ross Halfin
Front Cover illustration based on an original collage by M. Dubra in 'Salut les Copains'

Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume Two

Latter Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume Two
[Click above for album images]

Released as the sequel to last year's Best Of, this record documents Led Zep just as they'd reached their peak. The world lay conquered before them, they were selling out Madison Square Garden and making movies. Bonham, Page, Plant and Jones were the kings of the universe, the best rock band on the planet, no contest.

But from 1973's Houses Of The Holy onwards their kingdom began to crumble amid a horrible mess of witchcraft, heroin, family tragedies and coke-fuelled egotism. This record documents their work over that time, but far from sounding wasted and overwrought, it contains some of their finest moments.

Arguably Led Zep's most enduring tune, Kashmir is the sound of a million elephants marching on Trafalgar Square, a song that's still not been topped in terms of majesty. Not even Puff Daddy's platinum production skills on his 1998 version (Come With Me) could outweigh the power of the original. The Song Remains The Same is almost the best song The Who never wrote, while No Quarter's sleazy atmospherics set a blueprint for bluesy sleaze rock outfits the world over.

Statistics

Released:
Mar. 21, 2000 (US)
Mar. 21, 2000 (UK)

Chart Position:
#81 (US) #? (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 1-11-2000
Platinum: 9-26-2001

Tracks

1. The Song Remains The Same
2. No Quarter
3. Houses Of The Holy
4. Trampled Underfoot
5. Kashmir
6. Ten Years Gone
7. Achilles Last Stand
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine
9. All My Love
10. In The Evening
Quick Fact

This is an enhanced CD that contains a video from Earls Court 1975 of the band with audio from the studio recording of Kashmir.

Early Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One More Info

Early Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One EARLY DAYS: BEST OF LED ZEPPELIN, VOLUME ONE
Atlantic 7567832682
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Sub Octivider, Acoustic Guitar, Electronic Treatments
Robert Plant: Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Drum Orchestra
John Paul Jones: Bass, Keyboards, Piano

1. Good Times Bad Times 2:43 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You 6:40 (Anne Bredon/Page/Plant)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

3. Dazed And Confused 6:27 (Page)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

4. Communication Breakdown 2:26 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

5. Whole Lotta Love 5:33 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Willie Dixon)
Recorded in May 4-6, 1969 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles & June 1969, Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz.

6. What Is And What Should Never Be 4:47 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in June 1969 at Groove Studios, New York & June 1969, Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz.

7. Immigrant Song 2:26 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.

8. Since I've Been Loving You 7:24 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.

9. Black Dog 4:54 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

10. Rock And Roll 3:41 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios and Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

11. The Battle Of Evermore 5:52 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed at Olympic Studios with George Chkiantz.

12. When The Levee Breaks 7:08 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Memphis Minnie)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns.

13. Stairway To Heaven 8:02 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London, with Andy Johns.

Length: 68:09

Artwork/Design: Andie Airfix at Satori
Cover concept and photographic research: Ross Halfin
Front Cover illustration based on an original collage by M. Dubra in 'Salut les Copains'

Early Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One

Early Days: Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One (1999)
[Click above for album images]

As legend has it, Led Zeppelin never played the singles game. That's not entirely true -- Whole Lotta Love was a gold-selling, Top Five single, while Immigrant Song, Black Dog, and D'yer Mak'er all went Top 20. But since their reputation was built in part through album-rock radio, and since they never released Stairway To Heaven as a single, the impression that they were above hits and singles grew and grew. Zeppelin fostered it by refusing to issue compilations for years, forcing every fan to become familiar with the group on an album-by-album basis. Things began to change a bit in 1990, when Jimmy Page assembled the four-disc Led Zeppelin box, the group's first official compilation; it eventually opened the door for the 1999 release of Early Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin, Volume One. Early Days focuses on the first four Zeppelin albums, taking four songs from the first, just two apiece from the second and third, and the entire first side of IV, along with When the Levee Breaks. And for the diehards, a video clip of Zeppelin performing Communication Breakdown on a Swedish TV show is thrown onto the enhanced CD portion of the disc. It's basically the album longtime Zeppelin fans thought would never be released: a straight-up greatest-hits album. At one point, this may have been seen as sacrilege among devotees, but at this point, it's hard to imagine who would care about Early Days one way or another. Apart from the handful of casual fans who just want the radio staples on one disc -- while not caring that other classics are absent -- there really is no audience for this, since it doesn't recontextualize the catalog like the box sets. It's still pretty entertaining, yet Early Days feels unnecessary. Yet that cover photo is priceless.

Statistics

Released:
Nov. 23, 1999 (US)
Nov. 23, 1999 (UK)

Chart Position:
#71 (US) #? (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 1-11-2000
Platinum: 9-26-2001

Tracks

1. Good Times Bad Times
2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
3. Dazed And Confused
4. Communication Breakdown
5. Whole Lotta Love
6. What Is And What Should Never Be
7. Immigrant Song
8. Since I've Been Loving You
9. Black Dog
10. Rock And Roll
11. The Battle Of Evermore
12. When The Levee Breaks
13. Stairway To Heaven
Quick Fact

This is an enhanced CD that contains a video from March 14, 1969 of the band lip-syncing in a Swedish studio to Communication Breakdown. It was footage that was re-discovered in February 1999.

The Complete Studio Recordings More Info

The Complete Studio Recordings THE COMPLETE STUDIO RECORDINGS
Atlantic 82526-2 (U.S.) / 7567-82526-2 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric & Acoustic Guitars, Mandolin, Banjo, Dulcimer, Steel Guitar
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Piano

All nine studios albums, plus:

1. Baby Come On Home 4:29 (Page/Plant/Bert Berns)
Recorded on October 10, 1968 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by Glyn Johns. Mixed at Atlantic Studios, November 1992 by Mike Fraser.

2. Travelling Riverside Blues 5:09 (Page/Plant/Robert Johnson)
Recorded and broadcast on June 23, 1969 for the "John Peel's Top Gear" radio show. Produced by Joh Walters for the BBC. Released by arrangement with BBC Enterprises, Ltd.

3. White Summer/Black Mountain Side 8:01 (Page)
Recorded and broadcast live on June 27, 1969 at London's Playhouse Theatre for the "Playhouse Theatre Over Radio One" show. Produced by Jeff Griffin for the BBC. Engineered by Tony Wilson. Released by arrangement with BBC Enterprises, Ltd.

4. Hey Hey What Can I Do 3:56 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in July 1970 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed at Island Studios with Andy Johns.

Length: 436:10

All tracks and original albums produced by Jimmy Page.

Digitally Remastered: Jimmy Page and George Marino at Sterling Sound, New York.

Boxed Set Production: Yves Beauvais

Art Direction & Design: Eric Spillman / Art Industria; Eric Altenburger / Deserted Design; Richard Bates

Digital Editing: Zal Schreiber, Atlantic Studios, New York

Management Representation:
Bill Curbishley - Trinifold Management &
Brian Goode - Outrider Management (London).

The Complete Studio Recordings

Complete Studio Recordings
[Click above for album images]

THE COMPLETE STUDIO RECORDINGS

The Led Zeppelin hopped on the proverbial bandwagon in September 1993 and released their 10-CD set, containing all studio tracks, plus Baby Come On Home, Travelling Riverside Blues, White Summer/Black Mountain Side & Hey Hey What Can I Do.

You might ask, "Why do I need the Complete Studio Recordings? I've got all the studio albums on CDs, I've got the boxed sets..." This boxed sets gives you all the studio tracks remastered, it gives you album art, it gives you track information, pictures and a new essay!

If you like Led Zeppelin at all, this is the way to go. All the studio albums with graphics of the original vinyl and as originally sequenced. Please take my advice, if you like Led Zeppelin, invest your money and buy this set. If you have any hesitations at all, it is very likely that you have friends that like Led Zeppelin. Listen to their copies of the albums and find out for yourself.

An essay by Cameron Crowe, originally written for the first Boxed Set, can be found here.

Statistics

Released:
Sep. 28, 1993 (US)
Sep. 24, 1993 (UK)

Chart Position:
22 (US) #? (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 11-16-1993
Multi Platinum: 2x 11-15-1999

Tracks

All nine studio albums, plus:

1. Baby Come On Home
2. Travelling Riverside Blues
3. White Summer/Black Mountain Side
4. Hey Hey What Can I Do
Quick Fact

The boxed set design is in fact the scaffolding and beams and so on that support the exterior skin of a Zeppelin blimp and maintained the shape. Each of the ten compact discs also has a picture of the inside of a zeppelin on it, with no two the same, or coinciding with the picture on the exterior of the box set.

Led Zeppelin Box Set, Vol. 2 More Info

Led Zeppelin LED ZEPPELIN BOX SET, VOL. 2
Atlantic 82477-2 (U.S.) / 7567-82477-2 (U.K.)

Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
Jimmy Page: Electric & Acoustic Guitars, Mandolin
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion, Backing Vocals
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Piano

CD ONE
1. Good Time Bad Times 2:46 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
2. We're Gonna Groove 2:37 (Ben E. King & James Bethea) 
3. Night Flight 3:36 (Jones/Page/Plant)
4. That's The Way 5:37 (Page/Plant)
5. Baby Come On Home 4:29 (Bert Berns/Page/Plant)
6. The Lemon Song 6:19 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
7. You Shook Me 6:28 (Willie Dixon & J.B. Lenoir)
8. Boogie With Stu 3:51 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant/Ian Stewart & Mrs. Valens)
9. Bron-Yr-Aur 2:06 (Jimmy Page)
10. Down By The Seaside 5:14 (Page/Plant)
11. Out On The Tiles 4:05 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
12. Black Mountain Side 2:05 (Jimmy Page)
13. Moby Dick 4:21 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
14. Sick Again 4:43 (Page/Plant)
15. Hot Dog 3:17 (Page/Plant)
16. Carouselambra 10:32 (Jones/Page/Plant)

CD TWO
1. South Bound Saurez 4:12 (Jones/Plant)
2. Walter's Walk 4:31 (Page/Plant)
3. Darlene 4:37 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
4. Black Country Woman 4:24 (Page/Plant)
5. How Many More Times 8:28 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
6. The Rover 5:36 (Page/Plant)
7. Four Sticks 4:44 (Page/Plant)
8. Hats Off To (Roy) Harper 3:42 (Trad. Arranged by Charles Obscure)
9. I Can't Quit You Baby 4:42 (Willie Dixon)
10. Hots On For Nowhere 4:43 (Page/Plant)
11. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) 2:39 (Page/Plant)
12. Royal Orleans 2:58 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
13. Bonzo's Montreux 4:18 (John Bonham)
14. The Crunge 3:13 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
15. Bring It On Home 4:20 (Page/Plant)
16. Tea For One 9:27 (Page/Plant)

Length: 144:00

Produced by Jimmy Page

Digitally Remastered by Jimmy Page &
George Marino at Sterling Sound


Digital Transfers: John Kubrick at Sterling Sound

Art Direction and Design: Larry Freemantle

Boxed Set Production: Yves Beauvais

Management Representation:
Bill Curbishley - Trinifold Management

Brian Goode - Outrider London

Led Zeppelin Box Set, Vol. 2

Led Zeppelin Box Set, Vol. 2
[Click above for album images]

Released almost three years after the first boxed set, this boxed set is often referred to as the "leftovers". This boxed set contains the remaining tracks that were left out of the first boxed set. But make no mistake, these tracks are remarkable. CD ONE starts out with Track One from the first album Good Times Bad Times and has a track from almost every studio album. One tasty surprise is the previously unreleased track Baby Come On Home that was recorded in October 1968. Carouselambra ends the first CD.

CD TWO opens up with the rockin' piano intro of South Bound Saurez then heads towards a couple tracks that ended up on Coda, Walter's Walk and Darlene. Tea For One finishes up this CD.

Overall, this set has a bit of everything. It shows the wide range of musical styles, from folk and blues inspired songs, to driving rock and roll, to the more electric sound the band was playing with before John Bonham's death in 1980, this set showcases the wide range of musical styles the group created and performed. Well worth the effort, this package should not be viewed as merely "the rest" of their songs.
Statistics

Released:
Mar. 19, 1993 (US)
Mar. 19, 1993 (UK)

Chart Position:
#18 (US) #48 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 7-01-2004

Tracks

CD ONE
1. Good Times Bad Times
2. We're Gonna Groove
3. Night Flight
4. That's The Way
5. Baby Come On Home
6. The Lemon Song
7. You Shook Me
8. Boogie With Stu
9. Bron-Yr-Aur
10. Down By The Seaside
11. Out On The Tiles
12. Black Mountain Side
13. Moby Dick
14. Sick Again
15. Hot Dog
16. Carouselambra

CD TWO
1. South Bound Saurez
2. Walter's Walk
3. Darlene
4. Black Country Woman
5. How Many More Times
6. The Rover
7. Four Sticks
8. Hats Off To (Roy) Harper
9. I Can't Quit You Baby
10. Hots On For Nowhere
11. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman)
12. Royal Orleans
13. Bonzo's Montreux
14. The Crunge
15. Bring It On Home
16. Tea For One
Quick Fact

Baby Come On Home was subtitled A Tribute To Bert Burns. Bert Burns was a noteworthy producer in the early 1960s, having either produced or written some of early rock's memorable songs, such as The Isley Brothers' Twist And Shout, Them's Baby Please Don't Go (A song Robert Plant has covered over the years) and Van Morisson's Brown Eyed Girl.

Baby Come On Home was first recorded in 1964 by Hoagy Lands under Atlantic's label. Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand is the B-Side.

Remasters More Info

Remasters REMASTERS
Atlantic 7567-82371-2 (U.S. & U.K.)

Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
Jimmy Page: Electric & Acoustic Guitars, Mandolin
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Piano

CD ONE
1. Communication Breakdown 2:28 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You 6:41 (Anne Breedon/Page/Plant)
3. Good Times Bad Times 2:43 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
4. Dazed And Confused 6:26 (Jimmy Page)
5. Whole Lotta Love 5:34 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
6. Heartbreaker 4:14 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
7. Ramble On 4:24 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
8. Immigrant Song 2:23 (Page/Plant)
9. Celebration Day 3:28 (Page/Plant/Jones)
10. Since I've Been Loving You 7:24 (Page/Plant/Jones)
11. Black Dog 4:54 (Page/Plant/Jones)
12. Rock And Roll 3:40 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
13. The Battle Of Evermore 5:54 (Page/Plant)
14. Misty Mountain Hop 4:39 (Page/Plant/Jones)
15. Stairway To Heaven 8:01 (Page/Plant)

All songs published by Superhype Publishing Inc.,
all rights administered by WB Music Corp., ASCAP.
except 2, published by Songs of Polygram International Inc., BMI.

©1969 Atlantic Recording Corporation (1-7)
©1970 Atlantic Recording Corporation (8-10)
©1971 Atlantic Recording Corporation (11-15)

CD TWO
1. The Song Remains The Same 5:29 (Page/Plant)
2. The Rain Song 7:39 (Page/Plant)
3. D'yer Mak'er 4:23 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
4. No Quarter 7:00 (Page/Plant/Jones)
5. Houses Of The Holy 4:03 (Page/Plant)
6. Kashmir 8:32 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
7. Trampled Underfoot 5:35 (Page/Plant/Jones)
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine 6:28 (Page/Plant)
9. Achilles Last Stand 10:23 (Page/Plant)
10. All My Love 5:53 (Plant/Jones)
11. In The Evening 6:51 (Page/Plant/Jones)

All songs published by Flames of Albion Music Inc., ASCAP.
except 2 & 3, published by Superhype Publishing Inc.,
all rights administered by WB Music Corp., ASCAP.

©1973 Atlantic Recording Corporation (1-4)
©1975 Atlantic Recording Corporation (5-7)
©1976 Atlantic Recording Corporation (8-9)
©1979 Atlantic Recording Corporation (10-11)

CD THREE
1. "Led Zeppelin Profile" This track is a compilation of various portions of the following interviews, and lengthy selections from songs. 28:05
Jimmy Page
Robert Plant
Jon Paul Jones
"Hey, Hey, What Can I Do"
Jimmy Page
"Moby Dick"/"Bonzo's Montreux"
John Paul Jones
Robert Plant
"Kashmir"
Jimmy Page
"White Summer"/"Black Mountain Side"
2–8. "Station Liners" These are brief generic soundbites recorded by Jimmy Page for playing on the radio (e.g. "I'm Jimmy Page, and I'm ready to rock.") 0:23
9–20. "Interview: Jimmy Page"
21–32. "Interview: Robert Plant"
33–43. "Interview: John Paul Jones"


Length: 145:01

Digital Transfers and Editing: Rhonda Schoen
Additional Transfers: John Kubrick at Sterling Sound, New York and John Almeleh at Atlantic Studios, New York.

Produced by Jimmy Page

Package Design: Larry Freemantle
Art Direction: Bob Defrin
Booklet Cover Image: Mission Control, Bristol, England with Imaging and Photography by Chris Wroe and Jenny Moore
Booklet Design: Bill Smith Studio

Remasters

Remasters
[Click above for album images]

This project came about after Jimmy Page's disliking of the sub-standard conversion of the Led Zeppelin catalog to CD by Atlantic Records.

Jimmy Page spent a week in May 1990 at Sterling Studios in New York remastering the entire catalog with engineer George Marino.

The songs on Disc One are taken mostly from the first four albums--songs like Good Times Bad Times and Communication Breakdown demonstrate just how Led Zeppelin could perform "in your face" rock 'n roll, while Dazed And Confused and Since I've Been Loving You reflect the blues roots of these players. Whole Lotta Love and Black Dog show one of the band's true strengths, improvisation, while Rock And Roll and Heartbreaker show flashes of the metal influences that Led Zeppelin exerted on the many groups that attempted to emulate them.

Zeppelin did plenty of acoustic work too. The Battle Of Evermore, Ramble On, and Babe I'm Gonna Leave You are all acoustic pieces that feature the talents of Led Zeppelin without the veil of amplification, and it's fine work indeed.

Disc Two focuses on the latter part of the career of the band--the controlled violence of the extended jam in The Song Remains The Same is nicely balanced by the delicacy of The Rain Song, and D'yer Mak'er is an exercise in reggae rhythms that resembles the Caribbean feel of All Of My Love. No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot and Nobody's Fault But Mine are brooding tunes that represent where Led Zeppelin went with their early blues influences, while the epic Kashmir, perhaps their greatest accomplishment, shows just how expansive this band's sound could be.
Statistics

Released:
Feb. 21, 1992

Chart Position:
#47 (US)

Certified:

Tracks

CD ONE
1. Communication Breakdown
2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
3. Good Times Bad Times
4. Dazed And Confused
5. Whole Lotta Love
6. Heartbreaker
7. Ramble On
8. Immigrant Song
9. Celebration Day
10. Since I've Been Loving You
11. Black Dog
12. Rock And Roll
13. The Battle Of Evermore
14. Misty Mountain Hop
15. Stairway To Heaven

CD TWO
1. The Song Remains The Same
2. The Rain Song
3. D'yer Mak'er
4. No Quarter
5. Houses Of The Holy
6. Kashmir
7. Trampled Underfoot
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine
9. Achilles Last Stand
10. All My Love
11. In The Evening

CD THREE
Profiled
1) Led Zeppelin Profile
2–8) Jimmy Page Station Liners
9–16) Jimmy Page interview
21–32) Robert Plant interview
33–43) John Paul Jones interview
Quick Fact

Remasters was originally intended to be a scaled-down European-only release.

Led Zeppelin Boxed Set Essay 3

Led Zeppelin: The Music
by Robert Palmer


Seperately, in recent conversations, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones practically echoed each other's comments when pressed to define what it was about Led Zeppelin that made playing in the band such a special experience for them. "Musically," said Page, "we weren't afraid to go in any direction whatsoever. I guess that was the way we kept ourselves really alive as musicians. The band wouldn't have existed if it hadn't been like that." Jones put it this way: "The very thing that Zeppelin was about was that there were absolutely no limits. There was freedom to try anything, to expirement. We all had ideas, and we'd use everything we came across, whether it was folk, country music, blues, Indian, Arabic. All these bands that are now borrowing from Zeppelin haven't figured that out, and because of that, none of them have got it right. None of them have gotten close.

The preponderance of "Led Clones" on American FM radio, and continuing, frequent airplay for the original recordings, have kept the band's legacy alive. They have also done our memories of the band's music a great disservice by carrying on as if "Stairway To Heaven" and a few crunching, blues-based riff tunes - "Whole Lotta Love," "Black Dog" - represented the entire scope of the Led Zeppelin heritage. They don't. Zeppelin's stylistic and emotional range were as broad and encompassing as those of any other band in rock's history. The present set, programmed and digitally remastered by Page from the original master tapes, allows a new picture to emerge, the picture of a band whose only limits were the imaginations and resources of the musicians.

And the musicians had unusually rich and varied backgrounds to draw on. At a time when many British rock bands were still being started by purist record collectors and other semi-professional players, Zeppelin had a guitarist whose insatiable curiosity about different musics and prior career as a top session man had encouraged him to tackle everything from hard blues to acoustic folk stylings to Indian music. John Paul Jones had also served a long session apprenticeship, doing everything from Motown-style bass to keyboards to full orchestral arrangements. Robert Plant and John Bonham had been professional pub-wrecking provincial rockers who had tackled blues, soul, west coast psychedelia, and more. Any band willing to mix and match such a crazy quilt of experience and influences was bound to be different.

Despite the leadership Page exercised as the group's founder, producer in the studio, and de facto musical director, Led Zeppelin was definiitely a band. It is instructive to compare Led Zeppelin and the much anticipated debut album by the Jeff Beck group, Truth, both released in 1969. Beck puts his own name first and seems to have conceived the group primarily as a vehicle for his own playing despite the stellar talent of sidemen Ron Wood and Rod Stewart. Since both guitarists had become "names" with the Yardbirds, Page was sensitive to comparisons between the two groups; he was distressed to find out, too late, that both albums included cover versions of Willie Dixon's "You Shook Me." But from the first, Zeppelin had something going for it that the Beck group, with its battling egos and moody, introverted leader, lacked - a real group spirit. In Zeppelin's music, the song was most important, followed by the ensemble arrangement, overall sound and mood, then the solo turns. This group spirit had a lot to do with Zeppelin developing so rapidly, playing so tightly, and lasting so long without a single personnel change. Each member was considered irreplaceable, which is the reason the band had to call it quits following John Bonham's death.

"When recording," Page recalled recently of the Zeppelin sessions, "I was extremely conscious of building and maintaining the atmospheric quality of the song from square one. No matter how many guitar parts I might layer on in the studio, I followed the tune's overall theme and ambiance in my mind. Sometimes I did get carried away a bit, but fortunately I always managed to catch myself. That's what it's all about, catching yourself."

John also emphasizes his role as a team player, a song player. "I suppose in case it's an arranger's ear," he said while talking about the music in this set. "That was one of the very good things about the band, it wasn't just a bunch of musicians playing, we treated the songs as top priority. You would try to bring out the best in the song, rather than look at it as an excuse for a bliding solo."

Page describes his work in the studio as "a kind of construction in light and shade. Usually, we'd start with the framework, we'd lay down the tracks and Robert would do a guide vocal. I would then overlay lots of different guitars, and then Robert would come in and do a final vocal." Page experimented not only with combining the sounds of his Les Paul, Danelectro, and other guitars, but played them through various amps and miked them from different spots and from different distances, resulting in what can only be called in retrospect the beginnings of modern guitar orchestration in the studio.

Jones, also an inveterate experimenter, was always the heartbeat on bass, but gradually his keyboards became an increasingly important part of the sound. He tried everything from the reliable Hammond organ to an early EMS VCS3 synthesizer, hand-patched, which can be heard on "In The Light" and "No Quarter." He was adept at reproducing string sounds on his mellotron, but beware of generalizations. The strings on "Friends" are actually strings, played by Indian musicians in an Indian studio, arranged and conducted by Jones. On "The Ocean" he's playing and old Farfisa organ with a glide pedal that enabled him to slide notes up or down as much as an octave.

In the studio, as in their music, Zeppelin tried just about everything. "We had amps in toilets," recalls Jones, "mikes hanging down chimneys. Sometimes when we were renting these big old houses to write in, we'd experiment with the sound there. Very often the sound would suggest a tune, and we'd write or arrange with that in mind - 'When The Levee Breaks' is a good example of that."

Led Zeppelin made its impact primarily with its hard rock, some of the hardest around. It was a new, savage sound in riff-based electric music, one Page had been conceiving and refining during his years with the Yardbirds. "I was always experimenting with riffs and things then," Page said, "and began to see during that period that playing such music with a highly inventive rhythm section could move the music into new dimensions." At the same time, on Led Zeppelin the band's range and ambition were already in evidence. "I always thought our mixing of the electric with the acoustic music was one thing that really made us stand out as a band," Page said, "and it was there from the beginning. On the first album, between things like 'Babe I'm Gonna Leave You' and 'Communication Breakdown,'' you've got something that's driving all the way and then something that's far more subtle, with changes and such. And everything just keeps on moving from there." In fact, "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" is a kind of initial blue-print for later songs that used multi-part structures, complex arrangements, and constantly altering instrumental textures, culminating in opuses such as "Stairway To Heaven" and "Achilles Last Stand."

Zeppelin's relationship to the blues was complex. Jones was much more influenced by soul music and, especially, jazz; his keyboard idol in his early days was Ray Charles. He reports that on the Zeppelin tour plane, he and Bonham "were James Brown freaks and used to play his records all the time. It wasn't terribly cool to listen to James Brown then, especially around the FM underground stations, where they really didn't like black music at all, which was a real shame. But on stage, we'd get into funk grooves a lot. Bonzo, incidentally, had very broad listening tastes. When we weren't listening to James Brown or Otis Redding, he might be listening to Joni Mitchell or Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Bonzo was a great lover of songs."

Plant had started in folk and skiffle bands, put in his blues apprenticeship (with Bonham) in The Crawling Kingsnakes, and then turned toward west coast psychedelia before meeting Page. But it was the blues that taught him some of his most valuable lessons. He explains: "With the blues, you could actually express yourself rather than just copy, you could get your piece in there. Only when I began singing blues was I able to use the medium to express what was inside me, my hopes and fears. I could use several blues lines, well-known blues lines, but they were all related to me that day. And that's because the blues is more elastic. It also encouraged me to be more flexible vocally, even at the risk of losing the melody. I could just sing out. Yet the blues is just one of the many sources I drew from. I mean, Ray Charles was as much of a contributor as anyone else, and he was testifying. It came from all angles: Ray Charles, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Howlin' Wolf."

Although the young Page was playing Chicago blues the night he was "discovered" at the Marquee Club (a gig that led him to the first of his many studio sessions), his first inspirations were 50's rock and roll singles. By the time he'd begun to delve heavily into blues, he was already a session musician, playing straight pop one day and ersatz Motown the next.

In other words, none of these musicians was a blues purist, or collector, like, say, members of The Rolling Stones. Zeppelin played the blues, but blues filtered through a very individual group sensibility. Perhaps the most familiar example is "Whole Lotta Love," which begins as a bluesy riff-cruncher but moves organically into psychedelic sound-collage territory on the break ("that was Page and Eddie Kramer just going crazy twisting knobs in the studio," an observer reported) without ever losing sight of the mood and intent of the original tune.

When Page took a blues guitar solo on record, his tendency was to simply play two or three takes, see what came out, and use the best take - often the most exciting rather than the most technically perfect, for as Page admits, there are plenty of "mistakes" in his Zeppelin solos. Yet they still thrill, and convince.

It isn't entirely surprising to learn that Page's blues influences weren't exactly conventional, compared to the preferences of his contemporaries. In 1966, after a Yardbirds concert, I approached him and asked him about his favorite blues listening, and he mentioned in particular the piano playing of country bluesman Skip James, some of the more eccentric works in the entire blues canon. When I recently reminded Page of this, he said, "Yeah, those records seemed so off-the-wall in their timing, yet so right. If you count them through, though, they're regular 4/4. Anything like that, that was sort of bizarre or sounded avant-garde, that was for me. But I'd have to say my main blues influences was Howlin' Wolf, and his stuff wasn't just straight groove, playing on the beat, either. I loved his voice and the sheer intensity of the music as well as the timing of it. I've often thought that in the way the Stones tried to be the sons of Chuck Berry, we tried to be the sons of Howlin' Wolf."

Country blues and early Howlin' Wolf sides with staggered, off-kilter rhythms had a lot to do with shaping Page's riff construction, and he passed on this approach to Jones and Bonham, who with their fondness for James Brown's rhythmic whiplash were more than ready to meet the challenge. All that, combined with Plant's highly personal vocal approach, resulted in a new kind of blues feel, miles away from the more imitative work of Zeppelin's British precursors and contemporaries; it was heavy, even ponderous-sounding, but it was always swinging. "That was very important to us," Jones noted. "We all always liked bands that really grooved."

Individually, the players also expressed their own personalities within blues forms. Page never played a solo that sounded like any other single blues guitarist, something that can't even be said of Eric Clapton, who went through his imitative Albert King and Freddie King phases on records before finding his own blues voice. And Plant simply cut loose. Former Zeppelin engineer Eddie Kramer described the Plant of Zeppelin days as "a wild man of the vocal cords, with tremendous range and highly charged emmotional impact."

Zeppelin has frequently been charged with plagiarism for uncredited use of blues riffs and tunes. It's one thing to run afoul of Willie Dixon, a professional Chicago songwriter and session bassist who wrote and copyrighted the original "You Shook Me" and "I Can't Quit You Baby" and successfully sued after Zeppelin released their considerably altered versions of those songs. Yet several of Dixon's copyrights are of material from the folk-blues public domain - tunes like "My Babe" were current in the South long before he claimed them. It is the custom, in blues music, for a singer to borrow verses from contemporary sources, both oral and recorded, add his own tune and/or arrangement, and call the song his own.

The same sort of brouhaha might possibly emerge over Zeppelin's "Travelling Riverside Blues," heard here for the first time as preserved on a 1969 BBC broadcast. Is this the famous Robert Johnson "Travelling Riverside Blues"? The title and opening verse are the only evident borrowings from the Johnson recording, which was itself partly reassembled from traditional sources. Page's complex slide-guitar rhythms and the rhythm-section figures are miles away from Johnson's conception, and Plant strings together verses from a variety of sources, the way bluesman of Johnson's generation so freely did. Our copyright laws were written to the specifications of Tin Pan Alley and are of little relevance here, it seems to me. You can copyright a melody or lyrics, but not styles or riffs or rhythm patterns. Thus Clapton can insert a solo whose vocabulary is pure Albert King into "Strange Brew" with impunity, but Zeppelin's more deeply assimilated and originally conceived reworkings of material like "Travelling Riverside Blues" are sources for debate. I'm not arguing that Dixon didn't deserve royalties for songs he clearly wrote, but I am arguing that the whole issue is more complex than it seems on the surface. Meanwhile, Zeppelin progressed, moving further and further away from specific blues sources as they incorporated the blues language more organically into their own creative processes.

There was always a lot more to Zeppelin's music than "heavy blues." Page says he had a sitar before the Beatles got one, but couldn't find out how to tune it! One of the first British musicians to develop serious interest in Indian music, he explains: "I saw a parallel between the bending strings of blues music and the emotional quality of that, with what was being done in Indian music - especially in the alap [the early, meditative, improvisational, and rhythmically part of the raga] as well as in the timings or time sequencing of Indian music. Once I started to kind of digest the whole system of Indian music and learned what was involved, I realized it was far too complicated for someone who was really a rock and roll guitarist. But ideas from Indian music were well worth incorporating, tunings and such."

This Indian influence can be heard everywhere from the keyboard introduction to "In The Light," which was a Jones inspiration, to Page's "White Summer" / "Black Mountain Side" medley, recorded live by the BBC and heard here for the first time. But by no means is the medley "Indian" in form or execution. Its relationship to Indian music is roughly comparable to Zeppelin's relationship to the blues. In fact, Page calls it his "CIA connection - part Celtic, part Indian, part Arabic. That's played in a guitar tuning very close to the standard Indian sitar tuning," he noted, "but then again it's like a mishmash, really, because it's sort of pseudo-Indian and pseudo-Arabic as well, so that what comes out still has a sort of Western feel, in the combination, the fusion."

Page's and Jones's interest in Indian and Arabic music ran deep and was long-lasting. The latter recalls: "When I was a kid, my father had a big, old short-wave radio, and we could pick up North Africa, so I spent many hours listening to Arab music. I loved it - still do." Perhaps the best example of the ways in which these strains worked together in a band context is "Kashmir." Plant, an inveterate traveller who frequently visited Morocco in Zeppelin days and returns there periodically, remembers writing the lyric when he was driving, alone, across a desolate stretch of the Moroccan Sahara between Tantan and Goulimine. Page came up with the cascading, descending phrase for massed guitars that periodically punctuates or paces the tune. Then, he explains, "I had this idea to combine orchestra and mellotron and have them duplicate the guitar parts. Jones improvised whole sections with the mellotron and added the final ascending riff, whereby the song fades." The resulting mix of sounds, in which both guitars and brass lose their indentities in a wholly unique sonority, is Zeppelin at its best.

Plant recalls that he, too, had benefited from early exposure to non-western musical forms: "When I was 17, I began dating the consequent mother of my children. She lived in an East Indian area, so I was constantly surrounded by Indian film music. To a conservative ear, the swirling strings and the way the vocals came out of the instrumental sections wouldn't have been attractive at all. But to me, it was all very sensual and alluring. And five blocks from that was the Jamaican neighbourhood, where I used to hang out when I wasn't working, eating goat stew and listening to ska records. Then I later went to Morocco, which moved me into a totally different culture. The place, the smells, the colors were all very intoxicating, as was the music. On the radio you could hear a lot of Egyptian pop like Oum Kalsoum, and depending on where you were, Berber music. I never tried to write anything down or to play it, I was just developing a love affair. But I know it did something to me, to my vocal style. You can hear it in the longer sustained notes, the drops, the quarter tones. You hear that in 'Friends' or in 'In The Light' for instance, lots of other places too."

There are also strong British Isles folk and Celtic influences in Zeppelin. One good example is "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp," a kind of tribal highland fling. Another is "The Battle Of Evermore," lyrically Plant's evocation of the long history of conflict between Celts and Saxons along the Welsh border, near his home town. "You don't have to have too much of an imagination or a library full of books if you live there," he says. "It's still there. On a murky October evening, with the watery sun looking down on those hills over some old castle and unto the river, you have to be a real bimbo not to flash occasionally. Remember, I wasn't living in London. There you can be a fashion victim, but you can't feel like your average working man's Celt." At another extreme, Plant and Page shared an affinity for the rockabilly of the 50's - Gene Vincent with guitarist Cliff Gallup was a big favorite. This influence has emerged even more clearly in Plant's solo work but is certainly present here, especially in "Candy Store Rock" and the psychobilly of "Ozone Baby."

One thing this set throws into sharp relief is how much new ground Zeppelin broke, and how little credit they've received for it. The "world beat" phenomenon that has captured the attention of Peter Gabriel, Paul Simon, and other 80's pop stars has accustomed us to hearing music heavily influenced from other cultures. When Zeppelin started, there was no "world beat," and rock groups borrowings from other cultures were largely window dressing. (Did "Norwegian Wood" really need that sitar? Did it have anything to do with the song?)

Zeppelin's interest in world music, sparked by Page's and Jones's early curiosity, really began to pay off artistically when Plant blossomed as a lyricist. His travels through some of the more remote regions of the planet gave him plenty to think and write about, and many of his songs display a healthy (and, at the time, very rare) cultural relativism. Perhaps the apex of this aspect of Zeppelin was "Kashmir," about as perfect a blend of lyric, of music, tradition, and innovation, as one could imagine.

Zeppelin also showed us many a new way of swinging. To ears accustomed to lighter drummers than Bonham and to riffs less chiseled-in-stone than Page's, early Zeppelin didn't sound very swinging. Now that rap and pop producers have been sampling beats and drum licks from Zeppelin records for several years, often using them as the rhythmic basis for a new dance single, the lurching beats and staggered rhythms sound a lot different: they swing like mad.

Perhaps Zeppelin's greatest legacy is a quality that is now short in supply: they showed that four individuals, from varied backgrounds and with diverse personalities and imaginations, could chart their own adventurous musical course, make their own records just the way they wanted without intrusion from corporate execs hoping for a hit single, innovate with every album, and keep on doing it, long after many another band would have grown creatively slack from the excesses that with fame and fortune. Luckily for us, they persevered.

This collection is among other things a showcase for Page's radically recombinant approach to programming. His intricately plotted sequences of often startling juxtapositions reveal unexpected angles in even the most familiar Zeppelin works. This gives us a chance we rarely get with a rock band of this stature - the chance to share their own mature reconsideration of how much of what they did was built to last.

Led Zeppelin Boxed Set Essay 2

The Roots Of Heaven
by Kurt Loder


Here a tangle-haired singer leans back to shriek at the heavens, baring a glistening midriff and a dubious satin-clad bulge down-below. There a guitarist with a cigarette slumping from his lip feigns musical transport. A tricky, if predictable, hard-rock riff erupts. Somewhere, someone strikes a pose.

Led Zeppelin lives on in pieces, in pale imitations, its runty offspring still proliferating a full decade after the great group's demise. The pretenders gnaw at the Zepppelin corpus, and occasionally rip off a meaty shred for commercial mastication, but the heart of the band's accomplishment - its power, magic and mystery - eludes them utterly. They seem to think this was some sort of heavy metal outfit.

Arising at a time when the rock of the Sixties was starting to go soft, when singer-songwriters were already mewling at the gates, Led Zeppelin embodied the rock & roll insolence implicit in Elvis Presley's sneer - to wit: buzz off. Critics didn't get it? To hell with critics. To hell with interviews and singles, too. Here's the music.

Everybody knows they were all colossally wasted (well, maybe note Jonesy), and they couldn't have been getting much sleep, what with all those legendary midnight pagan blood rituals - but somehow these guys churned out a dazzling body of work that was by turns delicate and relentless and grandly dramatic, and musically adventurous beyond the call of commerce.

The group was astutely composed - seasoned London studio guns and cocky young bloods from Birmingham. As a producer, Jimmy Page displayed a gift for sonic sculpture that lent the records and unexpected majesty. And of course in Robert Plant he had one of the great sonic phenomena of the period to work with. Onstage, the two of them defined classic facets of the Fabulous English Rock Star: Page, dark, remote, mysterious; Plant the flamboyant stud, he interstellar vocalist, singing of love and lemons and misty Celtic kingdoms of nevermore. The flash aspects of the act appealed to a new crop of teenage boys weaned on whammy bars and volume knobs, and the sensuality of it all sent a definite message to girls: "Enquire within." (Despite Plant's baubles and curls, and Page's Pre-Raphaelite winsomeness, nobody ever mistook these guys for fey.)

So they had the front line covered. Fortunately, they also had John Paul Jones, who provided additional virtuoso touches - the strings, the keyboards, the recorder tootlings. And they had John Bonham, of course, who drove the whole endeavor with what might be called a nuclear rhythmic intensity.

Zeppelin's big sound found its most avid audiencs in the big country across the ocean. The band's raw power and bold invention might have been tailor-made for the new breed of louder, faster, post-hippie rock kids rising up in the States; and the connection that Zeppelin made with that audience - and has made, to some extent, with each succeeding season of American youth ever since - has been enduring. Eighteen years after its release, "Stairway To Heaven" - an album track that was never released as a single (to hell with 'em) - is still a major radio staple. And the roll call of other Zep classics - "Whole Lotta Love," "Kashmir," "Comminication Breakdown," "Immigrant Song" - still echoes over the airwaves as well.

These records do not sound dated. They define a style of music that has left unmistakable imprints everywhere - on slick-rock power ballads, Spandex riffery, punk and speed metal and sample-happy rap tracks, too - but which even today, at a decade's remove, remains a genre of one, its lone occupant Led Zeppelin.

Which is not to suggest that the band was without antecedants. Led Zeppelin was, in effect, the Yardbirds with creative control, a bigger beat, and a whole new line in hair-raising vocals. Assembled in the ashes of the Yardbirds' collapse, Zeppelin was heir to that group's rampant experimentalism, its Oriental inclination, its rude, guitar-charged aggression. Zeppelin was the Yardbirds freed from pop tunes, and re-tooled for maximum crunch.

Zeppelin was also a logical culmination of the frenzied pop decade that had preceded its formation, a period rich in musical ferment, especially in the British Isles. This great blossoming of British music in the 60's, of course, was rooted in the eruption of American rock & roll in the mid-'50s - intercontinental echoes of which had sent a whole generation of aspiring young English guitar hotshots scurrying off to their rooms to flail away for hours, days at a time, trying to work out how Buddy Holly made those chord leads ring, how Cliff Gallup kept that cool bop going behind Gene Vincent, how James Burton endeavored to make Ricky Nelson records interesting. These obsessions inevitably led budding British adepts back to the blues - especially the blues of the Mississipi Delta, especially as electrified in Chicago. By the late Fifties, a few adventurous trad-jazzmen were already promoting black American R&B, and before long there was a league of spindly white kids coming at it from the other direction, sitting around in places like Sidcup and Surbiton, sipping tea and nibbling biscuits, no doubt, while nailing down South Side barroom riffs by such faraway black guitarists as Muddy Waters, Hubert Sumlin, Buddy Guy, Otis Rush, Matt Murphy, Eddie Taylor - musicians largely unknown to the white public in their own country.

By 1962, an R&B boom was well underway in London. This may sound quaint to non-Brits - a blues frenzy fomented by people with names like Cyril and Alexis. But within the subdued context of English culture, these musicians were stirred by the music's untethered emotion and its vast expressive possibilities. Their devotion was a pure, burning thing, and it drew into their orbit such earnest blues scholars as Brian Jones, Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts, Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker, Peter Green, Jimmy Page.

In 1963, the year the Beatles exploded out of Liverpool with Merseybeat pop, the London R&B scene was only just coalescing. The Rolling Stones became a going concern, and a bit later the Yardbirds formed, initially as an acoustic-blues group. The core line-up was Keith Relf, harmonica and vocals, Chris Dreja on rhythm guitar, Paul Samwell-Smith on bass, Jim McCarty on drums. The original lead guitarist, Anthony "Top" Topham, was replace, in October 1963, by Eric Clapton - late of an R&B outfit called the Roosters - who quickly became the star of the show. By early 1965, however, Clapton had grown disgusted by the Yardbirds' unseemly hunger for a pop hit. When he quit, the group's manager, Giorgio Gomelsky, offered the slot to Jimmy Page.

Page had by this point already burned out on band work with an early unit called Neil Christian and The Crusaders. Laid low by glandular fever, he'd retired from the road and now prospered as one of London's most heavily employed sessions guitarists. Having no great desire to go slogging back out on tour with a band, Page recommended his friend Jeff Beck for the Yardbirds vacancy. Beck accepted, and in March 1965 the band's golden hour began: "Heart Full Of Soul," "I'm A Man," "Evil Hearted You," "Still I'm Sad," "Over Under Sideways Down," the ferocious "Train Kept A-Rollin'." A starburst of brilliant records. But the group became an increasingly tottering proposition. Page happened to be present at a 1966 drunken gig when bassist Samwell-Smith resigned from the line-up. Although he knew next to nothing about playing bass, Page volunteered to fill the breaches. Once aboard, he quickly switched duties with rhythm guitarist Chris Dreja, and for a brief period (chronicled on such tracks as "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago" and "Psycho Daisies"), he teamed up with Beck on guitar. But Beck, too, quit the group in the summer of 1966, Page was left to front the by-now weary band on his own.

The Page-led incarnation of the group recorded the last Yardbirds album, Little Games, a record that went nowhere but which featured a walloping title track and also introduced Page's bowed guitar technique (on a track called "Tinker Tailor") and his folk-raga solo opus, "White Summer." But the Yardbirds were spent. The group released its last single, "Goodnight Josephine," in March 1968 and broke up in July, leaving Page with legal title to the band's name and a handful of Scandinavian tour dates to be honored in the fall. He immediately set off in search of new Yardbirds.

Page wanted something the Yardbirds had lacked. He wanted a power belter along the lines of Steve Marriott, of the Small Faces, or Terry Reid, formerly with the Jaywalkers. Neither of them was available, but Reid recommended a pal of his - Robert Plant, the leader of a Birmingham group called the Band of Joy. Plant had cut some solo sides with CBS records, but nothing came of them. With Band of Joy he was elaborating an English response to the West Coast American rock of the period, particularly the work of such groups as the Jefferson Airplane and Arthur Lee's Love. In Birmingham, this was an undertaking of a decidedly uphill nature.

Page and Plant got together. Plant had a voice of almost eccentric dimensions - big enough in every way to hold its own against Page's guitar onslaughts. They talked music. Page was interested in hard, but he was interested in soft, too. He played Plant the Joan Baez version of "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You." He said, "I want to do this," and Plant, he later recalled,"looked at me a bit strange."

The singer signed on. So did John Paul Jones, a busy London session player. He and Page had done Donovan sessions together, among other things, and Jones had also added a fat cello riff to the Yardbirds' "Little Games." He was an ace arranger, a multi-instrumentalist, and a perfect fit into the New Yardbirds, as the nascent unit was being billed. John Bonham - Plant's drummer in the Band Of Joy - rounded out the lineup with a gratifying thud.

"When we started rehearsing," Plant later said, "the thing had gone beyond where the Yardbirds had left off. And when I introduced Bonzo to everybody, it was even more evident that what we'd got was turning the corner again, and there was no point in calling it the Yardbirds."

The New Yardbirds they were, though, when the previously contracted Scandinavian tour kicked off in October of 1968. But by the time they returned to England and recorded their debut album (reputedly in a head-spinning thirty hours), they were something really new: a rock band entirely in control of its own destiny. Page teamed with Peter Grant, a latter-day Yardbirds manager, to formulate Led Zeppelin as an autonomous fiscal-artistic entity, beyond the reach of record-company manipulation and other music biz annoyances. Zeppelin would follow its own instincts, and thrive or fizzle accordingly.

The band flourished famously, of course. And eleven years later, when Bonham died, Page, Plant, and Jones had the rare grace to bring Led Zeppelin to an end. They could have lumbered on and probably even played well. The hits and the glitz and the long white limos had all been great fun, but Led Zeppelin felt their musical achievement was at that time ineluctably complete. And despite some incomprehension on the part of the press and the shifting trends of pop fashion, they figured that achievement would stand. As you can hear on the survey at hand, they were right about that.

Led Zeppelin Boxed Set Essay 1

Led Zeppelin / Light and Shade
by Cameron Crowe

Hollywood, 1973. It was only the second day of Led Zeppelin's stay in Los Angeles. Already, the word was out. Hordes of fans prowled the hallways of their hotel, the infamous Continental Hyatt House. The lobby was filled with photographers, groupies teetering on platform heels, even an impatient car salesman who'd come to deliver a hot-rod to drummer John Bonham.

The cold steel elevator door slid open to reveal the ninth floor. Two beefy security guards stood there, demanding a note of authorization. One had already reached in, ready to smash the button marked "lobby." Luckily, I had a note.

Nine floors up, there was no sense of the furor downstairs. Robert Plant, fresh from the shower, strode to the window of his suite and looked out at the billboards of Sunset Strip. He noticed the gloriously run-down hotel, the Chateau Marmont, where Zeppelin had first stayed upon their arrival in America back in 1968. Plant joked to Jimmy Page, the guitarist leader of the group, that his innocence looked like it needed a paint job.

Page had something else on his mind. A representative of their record company, he said, had just called to report that the sales of the new album, Houses of the Holy, were spectacular. Page had been officially told that Led Zeppelin were the biggest-selling group in the whole world. A silent moment of triumph passed between Plant and Page. Across the hall, an Al Green record played on Jones's portable stereo.

"Well," said Jimmy Page, turning to the visiting writer. "What do you want to know?"

I wanted to say "everything." As a fledgling journalist still working at a record store, I'd fought for the opportunity to cover Led Zeppelin for the L.A. Times. The band had provided the soundtrack for my own adolescence, but I kept that to myself. I had a notebook full of questions, and as our interview progressed, Page and Plant seemed to warm from their notoriously press-wary stance. In the coming years, they would invite me to tour with them. We conducted innumerable interviews. Not many journalists were ever offered a front-row seat to the Zeppelin experience, and years later my files are still bulging with volumes of transcripts and passionately-scribbled notes I can barely read.

The Zeppelin attitude had something to do with Peter Grant, their brilliant and imposing manager. A little bit to do with the wicked humor of Richard Cole, their road-manager. Something to do with John Bonham thundering down the aisle of the Starship, performing Monty Python routines. With John Paul Jones, lost in dry-ice, playing "No Quarter." It had a lot to do with Page and Plant, side-by-side, sharing a single spotlight, ripping through "Over the Hills and Far Away."

The reverberations from those days run through most of what passes for rock and roll in the 1990's. Led Zeppelin has never been more popular, more pervasive, more...omnipresent. They broke up ten years ago, but you wouldn't know it by listening to the radio. Not since Elvis joined the Army has an audience so completely refused to acknowledge an artist's inactivity.

Zeppelin was also about the group's many, many followers. For a generation of kids, teenage angst was easily aided by a good set of headphones and a decent copy of Led Zeppelin II. Now that generation has their own kids, and the recordings sound even better.

Remastered by Jimmy Page in the summer of 1990, these discs represent a stunning reassessment of Led Zeppelin. "Putting the material together, I had a big smile on my face," Page said recently. "I love the running order. It's shed a new light on things and made them fresh. I think it's an interesting little journey..."

22 years after their formation, the warm glow of myth surrounds Led Zeppelin. Few other than Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, and John Paul Jones remember what truly difficult road Led Zeppelin traveled in their time.

London, 1968. Noted British session guitarist Jimmy Page had taken an offer to join the Yardbirds, only to see the group splinter on an American tour. He'd vowed to continue the band as The New Yardbirds, and set about rebuilding the group from scratch. Fellow sessionmate, bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones read an article in Disc Magazine after prodding from his wife and called Jimmy. Page had also gotten a hot tip on a young blues-singer from Birmingham, and he traveled there to see him perform.

"His vocal range was unbelievable," recalls Page. "I thought, 'Wait a minute. there's something wrong here. He's not known."" Page laughs. "I couldn't figure it out. I thought, ''he must be a strange guy or something." Then he came over to my place and I could see that he was a really good guy. I still don't know why he hadn't made it yet...."

At Page's home, they explored each other's tastes by playing favorite records-everything from Buddy Guy to the Incredible String Band to Muddy Waters and Elvis. Then Page broke out an odd choice. It was Joan Baez's dramatic version of the ballad, "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You." Page outlined a plan for a band that could play a song like that. "I'd like to play it heavy," he said, "but with a lot of light and shade."

It all made sense to Plant, who suggested they add his hometown pal and former bandmate, drummer John Bonham. The group's first get-together was in a tiny room below a record store on London's Gerard Street. The building has since been torn down, and the district reshaped as the city's Chinatown district, but Page remembers it vividly. "The room was about 18 x 30," remembers Page, "very small. We just played one number, 'train Kept a Rolling,'' and it was there immediately. An indescribable feeling...."

They rehearsed for several weeks at page's home at Pangborne, on the River Thames. First on the agenda was a two-week tour of Scandinavia, a mop-up of some old Yardbirds commitments. Still playing under the name the New Yardbirds, they soon entered London's Olympic Studios.

It was Robert plant's first time in a full-service recording studio. "I'd go back to the playback room and listen," he recounts. "It had so much weight, so much power, it was devastating. I had a long way to go with my voice then, but the enthusiasm and sparking of working with Jimmy's guitar...it was so raunchy. All these things, bit-by-bit, started fitting into a trademark for us. We finished the album in three weeks. Jimmy invested all his Yardbirds money, which wasn't much, into our first tour. We took a road crew of one and off we went...."

Their first British show took place October 15th, 1968, at Surrey University. They performed under a new name, Led Zeppelin, coined by the Who's drummer Keith Moon. (As in "you'll go over like a...") An early staple of the live show would be the song "Dazed and Confused", which featured an electric Page solo played in part with a violin bow. The bow later became Page's famous solo-signature, and it's an interesting historical footnote that the idea was first suggested to him during a session by the violinist father of actor David McCallum, of Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Zeppelin performed their intense, bluesy show at several stops around England. The response from the press was mild.

America beckoned. Manager Peter Grant had a keen sense of U.S. audiences and the vast underground movement that was sweeping the country. Grant saw an opportunity when the Jeff Beck Group, managed out of the same office, canceled out on an American tour with Vanilla Fudge. He called the upset promoters and talked them into a new group instead. Now all Grant had to do was convince the members of Led Zeppelin to leave their warm homes at the last minute, on Christmas Eve, for parts unknown.

They agreed with gusto. Page and Jones felt like warriors embarking on a new campaign. For Plant and Bonham, it was a long long way from the hills of the Black Country. The band flew straight to Los Angeles for a series of shows at the Whisky A Go Go. They drove to the Chateau Marmont, and came upon a good omen. Keith Webb, a friend from Terry Reid's band, was standing out front in the 80 degree weather. He extended glasses of champagne.

"Oh I say, chaps," Webb intoned. "Come on in, welcome to America, and Merry Christmas."

"Bonzo and I were amazed," Plant recalled in 1975. Seven years later, the sensations were still vivid. "We'd barely even been abroad, and here we were. It was the first time I saw a cop with a gun, the first time I saw a twenty-foot car. The whole thing was a complete bowl-over. It was Christmas and Christmas away from home for the English is the end of the world. I went wandering down the Sunset Strip with no shirt on. There were a lot of fun-loving people to crash into...and we started out on a path of positive enjoyment. Frank Zappa's girl group, The GTO's were upstairs. We met a lot of people who we still know, a lot of people who've faded away. Some of them literally just grew up. I don't see the point in growing up...."

The first reviews of the album were surprisingly skeptical. It was a time of "supergroups," of furiously-hyped bands who could barely cut it, and Led Zeppelin initially found themselves fighting upstream to prove their authenticity. A critical drubbing by Rolling Stone would remain painful for years. It set an ominous tone for the group as they left Los Angeles and headed up to San Francisco to begin their tour.

Manager Peter Grant had a game plan. He'd avoided releasing any singles, and had studiously booked the group into key hotspots for progressive music. This group would not compete on AM radio with Gary Puckett or the Fifth Dimension. Led Zeppelin was more about an entire album. It would be something to be passed between friends like a good joint. The key piece of this plan would be their show at San Francisco's Fillmore West.

"The important thing," Plant said recently, "was that Peter told us if we didn't crack San Francisco, we'd have to go home. That was the place that was considered to be essential, the hotbed for the whole movement. It was the acid test, forget the Kool-Aid, and if we weren't convincing, they would have known right away. I said 'I've been singing for years. I'd be happy to sing anywhere." But he had his eyes set on something I couldn't even imagine."

The band was sharing the bill with Taj Mahal and Country Joe and the Fish. They arrived to find they'd been advertised only as "Supporting Act." The mission was clear--do or die--and Led Zeppelin took the stage that night with a vengeance.

Jimmy page could feel something happening in the audience, even from the stage. "It felt like a vacuum and we'd arrived to fill it," he explains. "First this row, then that row...it was like a tornado and it went rolling across the country."

By the time the band hit New York, they were headliners. The first album went top ten and stayed on the charts more than a year. They would tour the US three times in 1969 alone.

Led Zeppelin II was largely written and recorded on the road, no small feat considering the pace of their touring. The album sported more of a band personality--they were getting to know each other--and Plant had honed his vocal approach. "Whole Lotta Love," the explosive first single from the album, would be the first big hit.

Today, none of the band members is sure when the monster "Whole Lotta Love" riff first appeared. John Paul Jones ventures that it probably came from a stage improv during "Dazed and Confused." Says Plant: "Wherever it came from, it was all about that riff. Any tribute which flows in, must go to Jimmy and his riffs. They were mostly in E and you could really play around with them. Since I've been playing guitar myself, I've realized more than ever that the whole thing, the whole band really, came straight from the blues.

By 1970, Zeppelin's popularity had spread to England and parts beyond. They had even unseated The Beatles in the prestigious annual Melody Maker readership poll. Singles were rarely released in the US, never in the UK. Concert ads were rarely taken. To be a fan of Led Zeppelin was to be a member of an exclusive club. The information traveled not in newspapers, but in the back of cars, on the telephone and on the radio. Two of their rare BBC radio appearances appear on this set. "Travelling Riverside Blues" and "White Summer/Black Mountain Side" were high-profile early appearances for the band, but Page felt no nervousness about performing the intricate guitar parts for national radio.

"My basic attitude toward performing live is the same now as it was then," he told me in 1990. "I don't know if you can put it in print, but it's this--shit or bust. You do it. No nerves...you just do it."

Led Zeppelin toured for two-and-a-half years straight before finally taking a break. When a vacation was planned, it was a working vacation. Plant had the idea of traveling to a cottage in the mountains of Whales for a songwriting session with Page. (Plant: "I thought we'd be able to get a little peace and quiet and get your actual Californian, San Franciscan, Marin Country blues without ever actually going there.") The name of the cottage was Bron Y-Aur, so-called for the stretch of sun that crossed the valley every day. "Bron Y-Aur" would become a title for a certain kind of Zeppelin music--acoustic, bluesy, and soulful.

"It was actually the first time I really got to know Robert," says page. "Actually living together at Bron Y-Aur, as opposed to occupying nearby hotel rooms. The songs took us into areas that changed the band, and it established a standard of traveling for inspiration...which is the best thing a musician can do."

Led Zeppelin III contained echoes of Sunset Strip, of the Byrds and the Buffalo Springfield, of Joni Mitchell and Moby Grape. Crossbred with their essential blues foundation, this was a new direction that truly pushed the envelope of hard-rock.

They were rewarded with their least-selling album yet. It didn't matter to Jimmy Page. The stage shows expanded to feature the new material in an acoustic set. Led Zeppelin's concerts became legendary affairs. "Dazed and Confused," still the roller-coaster centerpiece, could last as long as 45 minutes. When the floodgates opened, it was sometimes difficult for Page to close them again. Likewise for John Bonham's nightly solo, "Moby Dick." The "boggie" section of the show came late in the set, and it tended to feature whatever music the band was listening to at the time. (Some of the surprise songs played by Zeppelin: "Woodstock," "The Shaft," "Feeling Groovy," and "The Star Spangled Banner.") There were few effects, no tapes, just brute musical strength. Zeppelin live was a direct descendant from Elvis's early shows. Raw, direct a reminder of when rock was young.

Undaunted by the sales of the third album, Page kept to his original goal of bringing hard rock and musical drama to an essentially acoustic base. It was all about depth of feeling, he says today. In 1990, it's that same depth of feeling that keeps the many Zeppelin imitators just that. Like with a great comedian, you can retell the jokes but the laughs just aren't the same.

The next album, Led Zeppelin IV, was a watershed moment in the band's history. The lp slipped into stores in 1971 with little fanfare. Here was a more "mature" work that also rocked as hard as any of their previous efforts. It was remarkable music for a band that was still, essentially, a trio with a great singer.

Bonham and Jones had begun to feel their confidence. It was Bonham who spontaneously interrupted work on another (never-finished) track by playing the drum-part from Little Richard's "Keep A-Knockin'." And Jones had brought in another idea, inspired by the Muddy Waters album Electric Mud.

"I wanted to try an electric blues with a rolling bass part," Jones recalls, humming the part. "But it couldn't be to simple. I wanted it to turn back on itself. I showed it to the guys, and we fell into it. We struggled with the turn-around, until Bonham figured out that you just count four-times as if there's no turn-around. That was the secret. Anyway, we titled it after a dog that was wondering in and out of the studio. The dog had no name, so we just called the song 'Black Dog.""

The highlight of the album, of course, was "Stairway to heaven." The most-played track in radio history, it began like many Zeppelin classics...on a tape from Page's home studio. Recording at Headley Grange, a converted poorhouse in Hampshire, Page first played the track to John Paul Jones. "Bonzo and Robert had gone out for the night, and I worked really hard on the thing. Jonesy and I then routined it together, and later we ran through it with the drums and everything. Robert was sitting there at the same time, by the fireplace, and I believe he came up with 80% of the lyrics at that time. He was just sort of writing away and suddenly there it was...."

Plant picks up the story: "Yeah, I just sat next to Pagey while he was playing it through. It was done very quickly. It took a little working out, but it was a very fluid, unnaturally easy track. It was almost as if--uh-oh--it just had to be gotten out at that time. There was something pushing it, saying ''you guys are okay, but if you want to do something timeless, here's a wedding song for you."

Houses of the Holy came next. Released in may 1973, this richly atmospheric album was not an easy first listen. ("It usually takes people a year to really catch up on our albums," page once said.) The band hit the road again with new material. Their popularity was now so great that they served as a test-case. They were selling out massive stadiums that had never hosted rock and roll before. Records were breaking at every stop, yet in 1973, it was the Rolling Stones who were getting all the magazine covers. Led Zeppelin was still rock's best-kept secret. In the entire history of the band, they had never even hired a publicist.

The lack of press accessibility had kept the band mysterious, but the mystery cut both ways. What press reports did reach the papers usually centered on a) riots over concert tickets, or b) motorcycles-in-the-hallway-type road behavior. Peter Grant found himself involved in constant crisis management.

(Once introducing himself to Bob Dylan at an L.A. party, Grant offered a warm handshake. "I'm Peter Grant, manager of Led Zeppelin," he said. Dylan replied, "I don't come to you with my problems, do I?" It was the only time I'd ever seen Grant at a loss for words.)

The roguish reputation dogged Led Zeppelin for years. In 1972, Elvis Presley wanted to meet the band. Their mutual promoter at the time, Jerry Weintraub, took Page and Plant up to Presley's Las Vegas hotel suite. For the first few minutes, Elvis ignored them. Page--who had first picked up a guitar after hearing "Baby Let's Play House" on overseas radio-began to fidget. What was going on ? Did he really want to meet them? Should they say something?

Elvis finally turned to them. "Is it true," he said, "these stories about you boys on the road?"

Plant answered, "Of course not. We're family men. I get the most pleasure out of walking the hotel corridors, singing your songs." Plant offered his best Elvis impersonation. "Treat me like a foooool, treat me mean and cruuuel, but loooooove me...."

For a moment Elvis Presley eyed them both very carefully. Then he burst out laughing. Then his bodyguards burst out laughing. For the next two hours he entertained them in his suite. He had never heard their records, he said, except for when his stepbrother played him 'stairway to Heaven." "I liked it," said Presley.

Later, walking down the hallway from the hotel room, Page and Plant congratulated themselves on a two-hour meeting with the King.

"Hey," came a voice from behind them. Presley had poked his head out the door. "Treat me like foooool...."

The double-lp Physical Graffiti was recorded over several months at Headley Grange. The intention was to make a straight-forward rock album. One song stood out early on. The album was planned to culminate in the hypnotic new track, "Kashmir." Fifteen years later, all three members point to this song as quintessential Zeppelin, the truest of their many recordings. "It's all there," explains John Paul Jones, "all the elements that defined the band..."

The "Kashmir" riff first appeared on Page's home-studio work tapes. It was first a tuning, an extension of a guitar-cycle that Page had been working on for years. (The same cycle that would produce "White Summer," "Black Mountain Side," and the unreleased "Swan-song.") "The structure of it was strange, weird enough to continue exploring," remembers Page. Jones had been late for the sessions, and Page used the time to work on the riff with John Bonham. Plant added the middle section and, Jones later added all the string parts.

Originally called "Driving to Kashmir," the lyrics were inspired by the long drive from Goulimine to Tantan in Southern Morocco, the area once called the Spanish Sahara. "The whole inspiration came from the fact that the road went on and on and on," Plant explains. "It was a single track road which neatly cut through the desert. Two miles to the East and West were ridges of sandrock. It basically looked like you were driving down a channel, this dilapidated road, and there was seemingly no end to it. 'Oh, let the sun beat down upon my face, stars to fill my dreams..." It's one of my favorites...that, 'All My Love' and 'In The Light' and two or three others really were the finest moments. But 'Kashmir' in particular. It was so positive, lyrically.

"I remember at the time there were a lot of musicians who were really insensitive about their audiences interpretation of their work. You'd get all this negatively coming out, as if to be mysterious is to be negative, to be dark. Mystery is not about darkness. It's about intrigue. There's a fine line in between, of course. Not even a fine line...it's a gossamer thread.

"How on earth do you want to purport yourself? I believe that it had to be Light. Lyrically, you have to stand by your words! There was a lot of gloom purported by guys who went back and took off their stage-clothes and played golf. And I didn't want to be one of those guys. I wanted whatever I was saying to represent what I was doing.

"But 'Kashmir' was tremendous for the mood. A lot of that was down to Bonzo, what he played. Page and I couldn't have done it without Bonzo's thrift. He was a real thrifty player. It was what he didn't do that made it work...."

There are many successful bands who function like co-workers. They clock-in, clock-out, they exchange cards at Christmas. Thank you, and see you on stage. In my time around them, Led Zeppelin functioned like four very different brothers. It was the kind of closeness that allowed for friendly competition, for privately griping over another member, and for fiercely defending that same person in the next breath. Their comraderie stood in direct opposition to the often-heavy image of Led Zeppelin.

Once on the road, Robert Plant popped into a McDonald's for lunch. Slowly, the patrons began to recognize him. The room began to tilt towards him. Before long he was surrounded by young fans, and it's a tribute to his disarming personality that soon they were treating him not as Robert Plant, but as a co-conspirator and a fellow fan of the band.

"Hey, what's Jimmy Page really like?"

"He's my mate," Plant replied simply.

To this day, Page remains an inscrutable presence. He is ethereal, yet extremely forceful. Steely, yet soulful. Jimmy Page is one of the most powerful figures ever to be over-described as 'fragile." One afternoon in Chicago in 1975, Page let the room go dark as the sun set. He quietly, defiantly, described his future.

"To be able to fuse all these styles was always my dream in the early stages," he said, "but now the composing side of it is just as important. I think it's time to travel again...it could be a good time for that now. We've been in all these hotel rooms, touring. The balance has got to swing exactly the opposite, to the point where you've got an instrument and nothing else. I think it's time to travel, start gaining some really right-in-there experiences. There's always this time thing. Especially musically. I know what I want to get down and I haven't much time to do it in. I've got a real wanderlust right now. I want to move."

By July 1975, Zeppelin had accomplished all they'd dreamed of. The world tour had been a smash. Physical Graffiti was a big hit, and all five albums had re-entered the charts. The band had lived in each other's pockets for years, and their spirit was still strong. Now it was time to travel, to recharge.

Within three weeks Page had flown to Marrakesh to meet up with Plant, who traveling with his wife Maureen. Veering off the tourist paths, Page and Plant rented a Range Rover and drove deep into Morocco. The mission was to discover street music, to soak up the experiences that might enhance the next album. Bob Marley tapes blasting, they traveled through Ovazazatte, Zagora, Tagora, Tafraoute, the Atlas Mountains, moving north through Casablanca and Tangier to meet up with the rest of the band in Montreux, Switzerland.

Page took a brief break, flying to London to check the editing of the "Dazed and Confused" sequence for The Song Remains the Same. (The band had all but decided to shelve the 1973 concert film in favor of something filmed on their upcoming summer tour.) He had planned to catch up with Plant in a few days. Their wanderlust tour wasn't over yet, and soon they would be gearing up to perform live again.

Bad luck struck when Plant's car plunged off a cliff on the Greek island of Rhodes. Plant's wife suffered a fractured skull, and a broken leg and pelvis. Plant fractured his elbow and broke his ankle. They were taken to a small local emergency ward. Just how pervasive was Zeppelin's popularity? "I was lying there in some pain," Plant says with understatement, "trying to get cockroaches off the bed and the guy next to me, this drunken soldier, started singing 'the Ocean' from Houses of the Holy."

Plant's accident would keep the band off the road for two years. The Song Remains the Same, the film and soundtrack, were released to fill the vacuum.

The band is not fond of their only concert recording. After years of revelatory live shows, the concert captured for posterity was achingly average. "As far as the studio recordings went," says Page, "everyone single one of them has a certain ambiance, certain atmospherics that made them special. When it came to the live shows, we were always trying to move things forward and we certainly weren't happy leaving them as they were. The songs were always in a state of change. On 'song Remains the Same' you can hear the urgency and not much else. The live shows were an extension of the albums."

Plant's accident would thrust the band into their darkest period. For 18 months, it wasn't known if he'd be able to use his leg again. Plant spent a lengthy period of time drinking beer and "tinkering on the village piano." Clearly, Zeppelin needed a new album, and needed to feel their ability to make a great one. The plan was to record fast, to push the limits, to paint themselves in a corner and dare themselves to escape.

Rehearsals for Presence began in Malibu, California. It was an odd sight--Led Zeppelin with Robert Plant in a wheelchair. The band soon moved to Munich for the sessions. Every waking hour was spent in the studio, located in the basement of their hotel.

In 1977, Page described the album with a real fervor. "The general urgency and the pent-up whoa was in all of us. The mechanism was perfectly oiled. We started steaming in rehearsals. We did a lot of old rock and roll numbers just to loosen up a bit. 'For Your Life' was made up in the studio, right on the spot. I particularly enjoyed the guitar playing on the blues things. The solos never had that coloring before. I was so happy about it...especially since I have to warm up to solo. I get nervous about that kind of guitar playing. Really, very insecure about it. But that's the way I can really concentrate. I'm usually at my best when I' really exhausted or under pressure or both. When you're exhausted all you want to know is what you have to do. The Golden question is why this was done so fast, and why the others take so long. The fact is that this one, we lived all the way through...under circumstances that were extremely frustrating. We weren't sure about Robert, weren't sure what was going to happen. Everyone manage to pull it all in...it was great.

If each Zeppelin album was, as Jimmy Page says, a concept album detailing the mental state of the band at the time...then this one was a story of anxiety and frenzy and blues and pain. Presence, he says, is the most important album. It's a snapshot of a time when the group was stripped of its legendary power. They were running on pure heart and soul.

A dangerous period of inactivity followed Presence. ("You gotta keep your mind active," said Page at the time, "you can never just 'go on holiday."" Plant continued therapy on his ankle. Jones tried farming. Page retreated to Switzerland to produce "Bonzo's Montreux" with John Bonham. Each member was being asked the same question with alarming frequency--had the band broken up?

The day of gardening would soon come to an end. Plant's leg improved, and the band held their collective breath when he elected to get up on stage with Bad Company at a New York concert. It was a triumphant evening for Plant. He found he could still move the way he wanted to on a stage. It was a little wobbly, but it would improve. Yellow lights were switched to green. A Led Zeppelin tour was planned for the next year.

Meanwhile, rock had changed. Punk was raging through England, threatening to sweep all the old-time arena-size acts under the carpet. While Page admired the work of the Sex Pistols and the Damned, he was surprised to see that some of the younger musicians had their guns aimed directly for Zeppelin. (Said a member of the Clash: "I don't even have to listen to their music. Just looking at one of their album covers makes me want to vomit...") After winning the Melody Maker poll at the outset of 1977, Page had earnestly explained that "Zeppelin is not a nostalgia band." They rehearsed for two months, carefully assembling the set that would prove it.

The 1977 Zeppelin show was a three-hour tour de force. Page's guitar blazed, Plant's soul was on nightly display, Jones and Bonham swung. It was a thunderous break in the two-year silence. For the first time, critics and audiences agreed. This was Zeppelin at their tightest and loosest. The response was overwhelming. As Plant joked on-stage at Madison Square Garden, plucking up some roses left by a fan: "I didn't know you cared."

In Los Angeles in 1977, Page gave a particularly stunning description of the Zeppelin alchemy: "The motto of the group is definitely 'ever onward." If there ever is to be a total analysis, it's that. The fact is that it's like a chemical fusion...there's so much ESP involved in it. It sounds pretentious, but it's true. That's just what it is. When there are three people playing on stage, instrumentally, and I'm in the middle of a staccato thing, and Bonzo just for some unknown reasons happens to be there doing the same beats on the snare drum...that sort of thing is definitely a form of trans-state...it is sort of communication on that other plane. People get so scientific about it, I experience it every day. There is such a great creative thing there within all of us, you just want to keep going. People really bring it down to earth when they say 'Have you ever really thought of splitting up?''

But things would never be easy for Led Zeppelin. Tragic news hit as the band was preparing to leave the US at the end of the tour. Plant's young son Karac had died suddenly from a virus infection. The effect was devastating. Plant disappeared into the country to mend the wounds. His bandmates worried about him, wondered about the future of the group, but within a year Plant had re-emerged with new dedication.

In January of 1978, Zeppelin flew to Stockholm to begin recording a new lp. In Through The Out Door was an album of new sounds and wide style-shifts, odd directions and even the gorgeous Zeppelin ballad "All My Love." "The whole search is for the unknown," Page once said. "We're always looking..."

The band came roaring back to full-power in the summer of 1979. The seventies had been their decade, and they were closing it out in style. In August, two huge appearances at Knebworth had turned out to be emotional affairs for the homeland audiences. The band swept the Melody Maker polls again. "Fool in the rain," a rare Zeppelin single, was released in December.

After Knebworth, what would be the next step for the biggest band in the world? The answer came that next July as the group stealthily began their first European tour in three years. "Zeppelin Over Europe 80" opened with little fanfare--it was almost a dream for the Zeppelin faithful. There was playful and generous spirit about the show. (Page had even handled some of the stage introductions himself.) The set opened with "Train Kept A Rollin'," the first song the band performed together twelve years earlier.

Rehearsals quietly began for an American tour. The group had acquired a new motto for the States, "cut the waffle," as in no-frills and fewer solos. In early September they announced the US dates with a press release entitled "Led Zeppelin-The Eighties."

On September 25th, the band was locked in rehearsals at Page's home. The work was over for the day. John Paul Jones and Zeppelin associate Benjie LeFevre had playfully decided to visit John Bonham's room "just to watch him sleep." They found him dead. Bonham had turned the wrong way, accidentally, after a night of drinking. The tragic sight, according to Jones, looked shockingly arbitrary.

The decision to end the band came instantly. In a group this close, the loss was immeasurable. When the three members met in a London hotel room, it was only a matter of wording the statement.

"It was impossible to continue, really," says Page today. "Especially in light of what we'd done live, stretching and moving the songs this way and that. At that point in time especially, in the early 80's, there was no way one wanted to even consider taking on another drummer. For someone to 'learn' the things Bonham had done...it just wouldn't have been honest. We had a great respect for each other, and that needed to continue...in life or death."

After a time, Plant embarked on a solo career. Page recorded and toured with The Firm, then released his own first solo album. Jones continued to arrange and produce. All have maintained a stance defiantly apart from "Zeppelin nostalgia." They had accomplished the rarest of feats. Led Zeppelin were the most popular group in the world, and there would be no downward slide, no selling of "Whole Lotta Love" to a detergent company.

On July 13th, 1987, the band performed at Live-Aid, at JFK Stadium. There were priceless moments, but I'll remember Page's smile when Robert sang his familiar added-line to "Stairway to Heaven"--"does anybody remember laughter." It was a look that came from way down deep, and it carried with it a memory of a hundred Zeppelin shows gone by. In subsequent years the band would sometimes perform with Jason Bonham on drums, popping up at the 40th Anniversary concert for Atlantic Records or at Bonham's own wedding party.

"I look back at it all and laugh," Robert Plant says today. "I was just 19 when I got off the plane. It's like having a child, and I am part of that child. Shit. The answer to it all is growing up, developing a balance. So much of the time was like being in the middle of a knitting pattern which hadn't been finished. There were no instructions, and the pages were re-written every day...."

Still, the sound on the Zeppelin CD catalog had been bothering the members. Two years ago, on tour with his own band, Plant had traveled to Robinsonville, Mississippi, hometown of blues legend Robert Johnson. Sitting on the porch of the post office, looking down the dusty street of Johnson's youth, Plant slipped on a pair of headphones and listened to "Preachin' The Blues."

"The romance was great," says Plant, "listening to the scratchy recording. But the same thing wouldn't work for Led Zeppelin. In real terms, Zeppelin is as competitive now as it was in 1980. So it should be heard right. What we did back then was always make sure it sounded good. It was time to put Zeppelin, sonically, in their rightful place. For me, it's timeless stuff and it needed a Million Mile service."

For Page, the job of remastering and choosing a running order was a delicate matter. "You don't want to tamper with it," he says, "because the music means so much to people. But I'll tell you, it was great to hear it all again. I sort of re-lived every second of my life over those years. I could really tell why it was what it was...or is. On any given night, we played with our whole hearts. There was never a routine. There were always areas, within all the numbers, that challenged us. We had to be there totally, with everything...."

And Page is particularly fond of the new recording, an ingenious layering of Bonham's "Bonzo's Montreux" with his earlier solo "Moby Dick." "I had an internal whim that it might work," says Page. "When I tried it, I felt it was meant to be. It's a fitting tribute to John Bonham. I'm very proud of it."

"Some day," Plant says "I really want to write with Jimmy again. I'd like to see if we can get back to 'In My Time of Dying." That would be amazing. But I'm not sure we should call it Led Zeppelin. Once it happens, it becomes something so much bigger....

"Really, Led Zeppelin was Jimmy. I was a great foil. He was very much...there's a word, not ''perpetrator,'' but definitely he had a premeditated view of the whole thing. Even though with my lyrics and some of my melodies it took off in directions he might not have been ready for...a couple times later on, when I got more confident I might have turned his head around a little...but the big role was his. The risks were his. The risks made it memorable. Without Jimmy it would have been no good. When people talk about how good other guitarists are, they're talking about how they play within the accepted structures of contemporary guitar plating, which Pagey plays miles outside of. He plays from somewhere else. I like to think of it as...a little left of heaven."

Led Zeppelin Boxed Set More Info

Led Zeppelin LED ZEPPELIN
Atlantic 82144-2 (U.S.) / 7567-82144-2 (U.K.)
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals and Harmonica
Jimmy Page: Electric & Acoustic Guitars, Mandolin
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion, Backing Vocals
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Piano

CD ONE
1. Whole Lotta Love 5:34 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
2. Heartbreaker 4:14 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
3. Communication Breakdown 2:27 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
4. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You 6:41 (Anne Bredon/Page/Plant)
5. What Is And What Should Never Be 4:44 (Page/Plant)
6. Thank You 4:47 (Page/Plant)
7. I Can't Quit You Baby 4:16 (Willie Dixon)
8. Dazed And Confused 6:26 (Page)
9. Your Time Is Gonna Come 4:14 (Page/Jones)
10. Ramble On 4:23 (Page/Plant)
11. Travelling Riverside Blues 5:09 (Page/Plant/Robert Johnson)
12. Friends 3:54 (Page/Plant)
13. Celebration Day 3:28 (Page/Plant/Jones)
14. Hey Hey What Can I Do 3:56 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
15. White Summer/Black Mountain Side 8:01 (Page)

All songs published by Superhype Publishing Inc.,
all rights administered by WB Music Corp., ASCAP.
except 4, published by Songs of Polygram International Inc., BMI./
Superhype Publishing Inc., all right administered by
WB Music Corp., ASCAP; Track 7 published by Hoochie Coochie Music,
administered by BUG, BMI; nad Track 11 published by Flames of Albion
Music, Inc., ASCAP/Horoscope Music Publishing Co., BMI.

CD TWO
1. Black Dog 4:54 (Page/Plant/Jones)
2. Over The Hills And Far Away 4:47 (Page/Plant)
3. Immigrant Song 2:23 (Page/Plant)
4. The Battle Of Evermore 5:51 (Page/Plant)
5. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp 4:16 (Page/Plant/Jones)
6. Tangerine 2:57 (Page)
7. Going To California 3:31 (Page/Plant)
8. Since I've Been Loving You 7:24 (Page/Plant/Jones)
9. D'yer Mak'er 4:22 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
10. Gallows Pole 4:56 (Traditional, arr. by Page/Plant)
11. Custard Pie 4:13 (Page/Plant)
12. Misty Mountain Hop 4:38 (Page/Plant/Jones)
13. Rock And Roll 3:40 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
14. The Rain Song 7:39 (Page/Plant)
15. Stairway To Heaven 8:00 (Page/Plant)

All songs published by Superhype Publishing Co., all right administered by
WB Music Corp., ASCAP. Except Track 11 published by Flames of Albion
Music Inc., ASCAP.

CD THREE
1. Kashmir 8:31 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
2. Trampled Underfoot 5:35 (Page/Plant/Jones)
3. For Your Life 6:20 (Page/Plant)
4. No Quarter 6:59 (Page/Plant/Jones)
5. Dancing Days 3:41 (Page/Plant)
6. When The Levee Breaks 7:07 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Memphis Minnie)
7. Achilles Last Stand 10:22 (Page/Plant)
8. The Song Remains The Same 5:28 (Page/Plant)
9. Ten Years Gone 4:22 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
10. In My Time Of Dying 11:04 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)

Tracks 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10 published by Flames of Albion Music, Inc., ASCAP.
Tracks 4, 5, 6, 8 published by Superhype Publishing Inc., all rights
administered by WB Music Corp., ASCAP.

CD FOUR
1. In The Evening 6:49 (Page/Plant/Jones)
2. Candy Store Rock 4:07 (Page/Plant)
3. The Ocean 4:30 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
4. Ozone Baby 3:35 (Page/Plant)
5. Houses Of The Holy 4:01 (Page/Plant)
6. Wearing And Tearing 5:28 (Page/Plant)
7. Poor Tom 3:02 (Page/Plant)
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine 6:27 (Page/Plant)
9. Fool In The Rain 6:12 (Page/Plant/Jones)
10. In The Light 8:44 (Page/Plant/Jones)
11. The Wanton Song 4:06 (Page/Plant)
12. Moby Dick/Bonzo's Montreux 3:50 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
13. I'm Gonna Crawl 5:30 (Page/Plant/Jones)
14. All My Love 5:53 (Plant/Jones)

All tracks published by Flames of Albion Music, Inc., ASCAP. Except Track 3
published by Superhype Publishing Inc., all rights administered by WB Music
Corp., ASCAP; and Track 12 ("Moby Dick"/"Bonzo's Montreux") published
by Superhype Publishing Inc., all right administered by WB Music Corp.,
ASCAP/Flames of Albion Music Inc., ASCAP.

Length: 289:05

Produced by Jimmy Page
(except "Travelling Riverside Blues" produced by John Walters for the BBC and
"White Summer/Black Mountain Side" produced by Jeff Griffin for the BBC.)

Digital Transfers and Editing: Rhonda Schoen at Sterling Sound, New York
Additional Transfers: John Kubrick at Sterling Sound, New York and John Almeleh at Atlantic Studios, New York.

Digitally remastered by Jimmy Page and George Marino at Sterling Sound, New York, in May 1990.

Cover Images: Mission Control, Bristol, England
Design Coordination: Richard Hutchinson
Imaging and Photography: Chris Wroe and Jenny Moore
Booklet Design: Larry Freemantle

Boxed Set Production: Yves Beauvais

Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin
[Click above for album images]

The box-set comes with a brilliant booklet, filled with great essays on Zep from people like Cameron Crowe and Robert Palmer, topped off with great photos of the band & concise recording information for each song. Added to that the sequence of each CD and sound was remastered by Jimmy Page. The box-set touches on every Zep release, bar the live collection The Song Remains the Same.

CD One takes in tracks from the first three albums, from the obvious Whole Lotta Love, Ramble On, Communication Breakdown and Dazed And Confused to the more obscure, such as the Coda take of I Can't Quit You Baby from a soundcheck at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970; the Jimmy Page solo White Summer/Black Mountain Side, Immigrant Song and b-side Hey Hey What Can I Do. Other highlights include the rarity Travelling Riverside Blues, the divine Thank You and the underrated Your Time Is Gonna Come. The second CD is more varied (perhaps more accurately descibed as loaded)- the 15 tracks coming from the bestselling untitled fourth album. I like the way Houses Of The Holy's The Rain Song precedes Stairway To Heaven, or how we have several acoustic tracks The Battle Of Evermore, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Tangerine and Going To Califonia before the epic blues of Since I've Been Loving You. Black Dog and Misty Mountain Hop and D'yer Mak'er are rather fun tunes.

The third CD takes in the more epic side of the band, probably my favorite of the four. Physical Graffiti is well represented by the vast Eastern-inflected Kashmir, Trampled Underfoot, the fragile beauty of Ten Years Gone and the 11-minute In My Time Of Dying. There are three tracks from Houses Of The Holy: the rockin' Dancing Days, the powerfully-structured The Song Remains The Same & the epic keyboard-based No Quarter. When The Levee Breaks is included here and still sounds great- the drumbeat being sampled/mimicked on records such as Beastie Boys' Rhymin' & Stealin' and Chapterhouse's Pearl. Great to see two of the best tracks from the underrated Presence album: the huge hurt of For Your Life and possibly the band's finest moment -- the 10-minute primal thrash of Achilles Last Stand.

The final CD contains 14 tracks -- a reworked Coda-track Moby's Dick/Bonzo's Montreux, programmed by Jimmy Page, alongside several other Coda-songs: Ozone Baby, Poor Tom and Wearing and Tearing. There's also another Houses Of The Holy song, the somewhat overplayed The Ocean. There are more delights from Physical Graffiti: the experimental In the Light, the belated title track Houses Of The Holy and the acoustic-based The Wanton Song. Single Fool In The Rain is another uniquely-sounding track and the other songs from Presence are great: single Candy Store Rock and Nobody's Fault But Mine is another classic. Finally we have a few songs from the somewhat patchy In Through the Out Door album: the vast In The Evening, the blues-based I'm Gonna Crawl and the best track from that album -- the touching All My Love-- which ends a suitably great boxset from a suitably great band.

Essay 1 | Essay 2 | Essay 3

Statistics

Released:
Oct. 29, 1990 (US)
Oct. 29, 1990 (UK)

Chart Position:
#18 (US) #48 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: 12-11-1990
Multi Platinum: 10x 3-02-2001

Tracks

CD ONE
1. Whole Lotta Love
2. Heartbreaker
3. Communication Breakdown
4. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
5. What Is And What Should Never Be
6. Thank You
7. I Can't Quit You Baby
8. Dazed And Confused
9. Your Time Is Gonna Come
10. Ramble On
11. Travelling Riverside Blues
12. Friends
13. Celebration Day
14. Hey Hey What Can I Do
15. White Summer/Black Mountain Side

CD TWO
1. Black Dog
2. Over The Hills And Far Away
3. Immigrant Song
4. The Battle Of Evermore
5. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
6. Tangerine
7. Going To California
8. Since I've Been Loving You
9. D'yer Mak'er
10. Gallows Pole
11. Custard Pie
12. Misty Mountain Hop
13. Rock And Roll
14. The Rain Song
15. Stairway To Heaven

CD THREE
1. Kashmir
2. Trampled Underfoot
3. For Your Life
4. No Quarter
5. Dancing Days
6. When The Levee Breaks
7. Achilles Last Stand
8. The Song Remains The Same
9. Ten Years Gone
10. In My Time Of Dying

CD FOUR
1. In The Evening
2. Candy Store Rock
3. The Ocean
4. Ozone Baby
5. Houses Of The Holy
6. Wearing And Tearing
7. Poor Tom
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine
9. Fool In The Rain
10. In The Light
11. The Wanton Song
12. Moby Dick/Bonzo's Montreux
13. I'm Gonna Crawl
14. All My Love
Quick Fact

At each the four corners of the box set front cover there is a number. The numbers and what they represent are:

54: The number of songs on the box set.
69: (19)69, the year the first studio album was released.
79: (19)79, the year the last studio album was released.
(X): The sideways '8' is the mathematical symbol for infinity, representing of course, how long the music will last.

Celebration Day More Info

Celebration Day (2012) CELEBRATION DAY (2012)
Warner Music Catalog No. 532631-R2
RECORDED LIVE DECEMBER 10TH, 2007
O2 ARENA, LONDON

Jason Bonham: drums, percussion; backing vocals on "Good Times Bad Times" and "Misty Mountain Hop"
John Paul Jones: bass guitar, Korg OASYS, Korg X50
Jimmy Page: guitar, theremin, production
Robert Plant: vocals; harmonica on "Nobody's Fault But Mine", tambourine on "In My Time of Dying" and "Stairway to Heaven"

CD 1
1. Good Times Bad Times 3:12 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
2. Ramble On 5:45 (Page/Plant)
3. Black Dog 5:53 (Jones/Page/Plant)
4. In My Time Of Dying 11:11 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
5. For Your Life 6:40 (Page/Plant)
6. Trampled Under Foot 6:20 (Jones/Page/Plant)
7. Nobody's Fault But Mine 6:44 (Page/Plant)
8. No Quarter 9:22 (Jones/Page/Plant)

CD 2
1. Since I've Been Loving You 7:52 (Jones/Page/Plant)
2. Dazed And Confused 11:44 (Page; inspired by Jake Holmes)
3. Stairway To Heaven 8:49 (Page/Plant)
4. The Song Remains The Same 5:47 (Page/Plant)
5. Misty Mountain Hop 5:08 (Jones/Page/Plant)
6. Kashmir 9:07 (Bonham?Page/Plant)
7. Whole Lotta Love 7:26 (Bonham/Willie Dixon/Jones/Page/Plant)
8. Rock And Roll 4:35 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)

Big Mick: Live Sound Mixing
Dick Carruthers: Direction
John Davis: Mastering
Alan Moulder: Audio Mixing (Recorded music)
Victor Riva: Special Effects

Celebration Day

Celebration Day (2012)
[Click above for album images]

Contrary to popular perception, Led Zeppelin isn't exactly averse to reunions. If anything, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant can't keep away from each other. Just four years after John Bonham's 1980 death, Page laid down guitar on Robert Plant's oldies act the Honeydrippers, and not long after that, John Paul Jones joined the pair for a performance at 1985's Live Aid. That set was trashed by the public and band alike, as was their subsequent 1988 appearance at Atlantic Records' 40th Anniversary celebration, but despite these lackluster gigs, rumors of a full-fledged reunion continued to circulate well into the new millennium, even after Page & Plant recorded a pair of albums in the mid-'90s -- a project that caused tension with Jones, who was unaware of the collaboration until its release. Eventually, all the bad blood cooled and the trio once again reunited, this time with Bonham's son Jason on drums, for a full-fledged set as the headliners for the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert. Five years later, this reunion was finally released as Celebration Day, a live album available either as an audio or a CD/DVD set, letting the world at large experience what was roundly and rightly acclaimed as a near-perfect reunion. Why is Celebration Day such a resounding success? The snide answer is rehearsal: Zeppelin knew their previous two returns to the stage weren't up to snuff so they spent a great deal of time woodshedding, realizing their reputation was on the line. And since none of the participants were truly tempted by an ongoing reunion, one where they would have to hawk the same set list at every corner of the globe for over a year, they decided to pour all they had into this one-off concert, betting that one great gig would trump a globe-conquering tour. They were right. Celebration Day is an ideal coda for Led Zeppelin, proof that the group's skills only deepened with age. Never once does the group sound as if they're grasping at re-creating their youth; they've selected a set heavy on blues, atmosphere, and hits, songs that allow each member -- including Jason Bonham -- to stretch out and casually flaunt his skills. Plant may no longer be able to reach the soaring highs he did in the '70s, but his lowered range gives "Black Dog" and "The Song Remains the Same" gravity, and helps give "Trampled Under Foot" a gut-level punch. Page still can muff a note or two -- so can the band, actually, with Plant missing a line on the opening "Good Times Bad Times," a mistake that's thankfully left uncorrected -- but his imagination is unchained, and, when compared to the Page/Plant records of the '90s, it becomes clear how much Jones contributed to the band's chemistry, lending it grit and funk ("Misty Mountain Hop" grooves more than any song without bass should), deepening and coloring Page's riffs, letting the band bounce out and return to center. All of this unique chemistry is evident on Celebration Day -- underscored ever so slightly by the presence of Jason Bonham, the son of the king who now seems like the only possible heir to the throne, emphasizing that the band is a family affair -- and while this reunion is so unexpectedly, impossibly good that you'd want to experience this in the flesh, it also underscores the wisdom of leaving this as a one-time thing. This is so good that this is how you want to remember them: older, perhaps wiser, and still majestic. From http://www.allmusic.com/album/celebration-day-mw0002423203

Statistics

Released:
Nov. 19, 2012 (CD)
Feb. 12. 2013 (Vinyl)

Chart Position:
#9 (US) #4 (UK)

Certified:

Tracks

DISC ONE
1. Good Times Bad Times
2. Ramble On
3. Black Dog
4. In My Time Of Dying
5. For Your Life
6. Trampled Under Foot
7. Nobody Fault But Mine
8. No Quarter


DISC TWO
1. Since I've Been Loving You
2. Dazed And Confused
3. Stairway To Heaven
4. The Song Remains The Same
5. Misty Mountain Hop
6. Kashmir
7. Whole Lotta Love
8. Rock And Roll
Quick Fact

Led Zeppelin earned their first Grammy award, the Best Rock Album, for Celebration Day in 2014.

How The West Was Won More Info

How The West Was Won HOW THE WEST WAS WON
Atlantic 83587-2 (U.S. & U.K.)
Vocals and Harmonica: Robert Plant
Acoustic and Electric Guitars: Jimmy Page
Bass Guitar, Keyboards and Mandolin: John Paul Jones
Drums and Percussion: John Bonham

DISC ONE
1. LA Drone* 0:14 (Page/Jones)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

2. Immigrant Song* 3:42 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

3. Heartbreaker* 7:25 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

4. Black Dog** 5:41 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

5. Over The Hills And Far Away** 5:08 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

6. Since I've Been Loving You* 8:02 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

7. Stairway To Heaven* 9:38 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

8. Going To California* 5:37 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

9. That's The Way** 5:54 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

10. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp* 4:55 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

DISC TWO
1. Dazed And Confused** 25:25 (Page)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP
Medley contains Walter's Walk, (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP
The Crunge, (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

2. What Is And What Should Never Be* 4:41 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

3. Dancing Days* 3:42 (Page/Plant)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

4. Moby Dick** 19:20 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

DISC THREE
1. Whole Lotta Love** 23:08 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham and Willie Dixon)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP
Medley contains Boogie Chillun, 2:37, (John Lee Hoker, Bernard Besman)
Admin. by BMG Music/Sony/ATV Music
Let's Have A Party, 1:52, (Jerry Leiber), Carlin Music Corp.
Hello Marylou, 3:08, (Gene Pitney), Warner Chappell
Going Down Slow, 8:39, (James B Oden), Universal/MCA Music Group

2. Rock And Roll* 3:56 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

3. The Ocean** 4:21 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

4. Bring It On Home** 9:30 (Willie Dixon)
Hoochie Coochie Music, BMI, Admin. by Bug Music
Medley contains Bring It On Back, (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Admin. by WB Music Corp. ASCAP

*Long Beach Arena **LA Forum

Length: 150:27

Produced by Jimmy Page

Original recording at LA Forum (June 25, 1972) and Long Beach Arena (June 27, 1972) by Eddie Kramer
Engineered and mixed at SARM West Studios, London by Kevin Shirley
Sound Assistant: Drew Griffiths
Design and Artwork: Phil Lemon
Creative Consultant: Ross Halfin
Photography: Jim Cummins/Star File; James Fortune/Rock and Roll Gallery; Jeffrey Mayer; Michael Putland/Retna

How The West Was Won

How The West Was Won
[Click above for album images]

This collection of performances from 2 shows in 1972 (June 25th at LA Forum, June 27th at Long Beach Arena) represent Led Zeppelin at their best. The versions of Whole Lotta Love, Dazed and Confused, and Bring It On Home are all at least 10 minutes in length and are sure to please every Zeppelin fan out there. Whole Lotta Love is here in all its live glory, containing the medley of covers that extended it to 23+ minutes of pure Zeppelin bliss. As expected, Dazed and Confused features Jimmy Page playing his guitar with the violin bow, and is yet another stellar version of this song to add to our CD collections. The acoustic set here is also present, featuring excellent versions of Going to California, That's The Way, and Bron-Y-Aur Stomp. The medley of LA Drone & Immigrant Song kicks the set off with a bang, and an excellent version of Heartbreaker follows, with Page totally kicking but during his solo, incorporating Bach's Bouree in E-Minor into it. There are stellar versions of Stairway to Heaven, Since I've Been Loving You, and What Is and What Should Never Be on here as well. As expected, the 23-minute Whole Lotta Love medley is a definite highlight, as is Dazed and Confused. Drummers are bound to be impressed by the late, great John Bonham's extended drum solo on Moby Dick.

Although the Houses of the Holy album had yet to be released, those in attendence were treated to previews of some of the songs, and the versions of Over the Hills and Far Away, Dancing Days, and The Ocean all kick massive behind. A just-under-10-minute version of Bring It On Home closes off this CD with a bang, and leaving the listener in awe.

Also when listening to it, one cannot help but notice how good the sound quality is. Any Zeppelin fan knows that Jimmy Page, producer for all the albums and a key songwriter, settles for nothing but the best, and only that. When Led Zeppelin's catalogue was first released on CD, the sound quality was inferior, so Jimmy Page himself remastered the CDs, showing that he not only cares about the old fans, but the young fans growing in the 1990s discovering the group. With BBC Sessions, Jimmy was in charge of that, and gave us a great sounding album of BBC material. And once again, he has proven his loyalty to the fans (and to himself and his band) and given us an amazing-sounding live record with great material on it.
Statistics

Released:
May 27, 2003 (US)
May 27, 2003 (UK)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #5 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: May 27, 2003
Multi Platinum: May 27, 2003

Tracks

CD ONE
1. LA Drone
2. Immigrant Song
3. Heartbreaker
4. Black Dog
5. Over The Hills And Far Away
6. Since I've Been Loving You
7. Stairway To Heaven
8. Going To California
9. That's The Way
10. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp

CD TWO
1. Dazed And Confused
2. What Is And What Should Never Be
3. Dancing Days
4. Moby Dick

CD THREE
1. Whole Lotta Love
2. Rock And Roll
3. The Ocean
4. Bring It On Home
Quick Fact

Plant said, "When we did the LA Forum, we made some recordings of the rehearsal, and we did about an hour's run through which we ended up getting an echo set going. I think we played every number on Elvis' 'Golden Discs Volume One'."

BBC Sessions Liner Notes

LED ZEPPELIN - BBC SESSIONS

Precious few broadcast documents of Led Zeppelin can be found, and until recently, none of them in an official release.

These BBC sessions capture the essence of early Led Zeppelin at its rawest and freshest.

For a pefection-obsessed studio group like Zeppelin, the concept of broadcasting 'just so' performances, improvised and mostly withou overdubs, seemed like an extreme challenge. But in reality, it was the kind of challenge that early fans of Zeppelin could expect from the band ... they were in league with those few performing artists who could do ten versions of the same song, roughly the same time length, and all of them still sounding radically different.

Led Zeppelin were essentially an improvisational band. The thrill for any attendant to their concerts was to get into a trip where nobody really knew where or how far they would be taken ...

Because of their concert reputation, Zeppelin were always wary of how the media would package their image. The sixties radio broadcasts treated the artists as two-minute hit commodities. Led Zeppelin were there to break and transcend the traditional media treatment of those ages. None of the material released in this set was meant to go beyond the boundaries of the radio. Ironically, the studio and broadcast constraints actually concentrated the intensity of the Live Led Zeppelin Experience.

But first, let's understand these performances in their historical context. Led Zeppelin selected the highly reputable John Peel's 'top Gear', Chris Grant's 'tasty Pop Sundae' and Radio One's 'In Concert' series for their British radio appearances.

The earliest Top Gear selection of sessions included in this set was recorded on March 3, 1969 and broadcast March 23. They had just finished the successful first US tour and were about to embark on a second Scandinavian tour. You Shook Me, I Can't Quit You and Dazed And Confused are deliberately slow, minimalistic, compact and adventurous ... pure blues pastiche. So much so that the inexhaustible blues baggage inside Plant's head lets him rework the songs using Nineteen Years Old from Muddy Waters as part of I Can't Quit You and create new lyrics for Dazed And Confused. This was the first British broadcast test for Led Zeppelin ... short but intense.

Chris Grant's Tasty pop Sundae sessions were recorded on June 16, 1969 (broadcast June 22) - only three months later than the previous sessions - but there is a world of difference. They had started working on Led Zeppelin II and were about to start the third American tour. Adamant and more devastating than the March sessions, these are also benefited from the use of overdubs. The Girl I Love, with its infectious riff and allusions to Sleepy John Estes (underlined by the heavy hammer of John Bonham and a fine Jimmy Page solo) was never officially released. Nor was a fiery Somethin' Else, Communication Breakdown has a slow and provocative Just A Little Bit funky interlude.

The second John Peel's Top Gear (recorded June 24, 1969, broadcast June 29) finds Led Zeppelin embarking on their most ambitious set ever, this time including two songs from the future second album and an unreleased track. What Is And What Should Never Be is heavily treated with echoing slide guitar and John Paul Jones' most intricate bass lines, and also includes John Bonham's broadcast gong debut. Travelling Riverside Blues is a Robert Johnson blues pastiche ... Plant squeezes the lemon wrapped inside a rollercoaster of slide guitar workouts. But it is the first broadcast of Whole Lotta Love that really sweeps us into a tidal wave of sound. A radically different, perhaps even superior version compared to the second album release: Page gets straight into pure muscular riffing, while the pristine voice of Plant creeps over it, waiting for the rest of the group to set the stage on fire. The Theremin section leads to a uniquely dynamic wah-wah solo guitar break (extended two bars). A vocal-instrumental race finishes the piece.

After these extremely strong sessions, the group was ready to take a risk: the recreation of a typical June '69 Led Zeppelin concert in a radio broadcast and in front of a live audience ... The Playhouse Theatre performance for the BBC Rock Hour (June 27, 1969) was a landmark that set standards for the presentation of Rock Music in the radio. And they were on top form. The dual introduction of Communication Breakdown and I Can't Quit You contrasts with the slow mayhem of You Shook Me (highlighted this time by an extraordinary, moody organ solo by Jones). The apotheosis of How Many More Times has changed compared to early 1969 versions: no violin bow psycho-interlude here anymore ... instead there is the 'Bolero' guitar solo, and by this time, if you listen attentively, in the middle of the non-stop instrumental rollercoaster, Plant recognises that he doesn't know what he's saying but he's having a good time ... a sharp and eloquent 'squeeze My Lemon' (Robert Plant's self-parody of the sarcastic, sour blues crying of the legendary Robert Johnson) caps the frenzy to keep the balance.

One of the fascinating aspects of Led Zeppelin is that in those days they performed as if every concert would be the last. And this is the reason why these sessions have aged so well ... they sound as if recorded yesterday.

For the last sessions we will have to travel two years in time to John Peel's BBC Rock Hour which takes place at the Paris Studios in London, April 1, 1971 (broadcast 4 April). This is probably the most famous of the group's radio appearances, bootlegged a myriad of times and released in every conceivable form (including being spliced and edited together with fragments of the 1969 sessions!) It is a typical early '71 concert, precisely in the middle of the British 'Return To The Clubs' polemic tour.

Highlights include previews of the Fourth album (eight months before its release) like Black Dog (including Bonham's Out On The Tiles introduction), Going To California and the first ever broadcast of Stairway To Heaven. No applause greets the opening bars, just expectation from the very quiet studio audience. In this primtive version you can almost 'see' Page changing fret boards of the new double-necked guitar. There's tension in the air in contrast to the distended frenzy of 1969. The magic moments are less visceral and more cerebral. Page's Dazed And Confused has everybody flying high in a specially spaced-out finale. An almost accidental, precise full stop after the psycho-Theremin frenzy of Whole Lotta Love is pure tight-but-loose.

The famed side of Led Zeppelin as cover group is well represented here: the medley of classics flows, starting with the group's version of John Lee Hooker's Boogie Chillun'; Truckin' Little Mama; Fixin' To Die; That's Alright Mama; and A Mess Of Blues enhanced with an excellent Jimmy Page guitar solo. The organ of John Paul Jones introduces Thank You, finishing a tight and compact (even if nervous at times) performace.

This double CD set is much more than just a compilation from the BBC Broadcasts. It captures the group in its heyday and it is an historical document and a tribute to music and to Led Zeppelin's integrity as musicians. Perhaps the sound quality of these recordings is not at the level of Zeppelin's original releases ... for some, this is Led Zeppelin warts an' all. But technocratic perfection isn't what really counts for us; we demand creativity and risk.

A captured moment of spontaneous creativity is worth more than a thousand hours of computerised perfection. And anyone can still find that creativity in these Led Zeppelin performances.

BBC Sessions More Info

BBC Sessions BBC SESSIONS
Atlantic 75678-83061-2 (U.S. & U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Piano

CD ONE
1. You Shook Me 5:14 (Willie Dixon, J.B. Lenoir)
"Top Gear"
Recorded 3.3.69. Transmitted 23.3.69
(Arc Music/Hoochie Coochie Music. BMI, adm. by Bug Music)

2. I Can't Quit You Baby 4:22 (Willie Dixon)
"Top Gear"
Recorded 3.3.69. Transmitted 23.3.69
(Hoochie Coochie Music. BMI, adm. by Bug Music. Contains sample of ''19 Years Old'' by Muddy Waters, published by Watertoons Music, BMI, adm. by Bug Music)

3. Communication Breakdown 3:12 (Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham)
"Chris Grant's Tasty Pop Sundae"
Recorded 16.6.69. Transmitted 22.6.69

4. Dazed And Confused 6:39 (Jimmy Page)
"Top Gear"
Recorded 3.3.69. Transmitted 23.3.69

5. The Girl I Love She Got Long Black Wavy Hair 3:00 (Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Robert Plant, John Bonham, John Estes)
"Chris Grant's Tasty Pop Sundae"
Recorded 16.6.69. Transmitted 22.6.69
(Southern Music Publishing Company Inc. ASCAP)

6. What Is And What Should Never Be 4:20 (Page, Jones, Bonham)
"Chris Grant's Tasty Pop Sundae"
Recorded 16.6.69. Transmitted 22.6.69

7. Communication Breakdown 2:40 (Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham)
"Top Gear"
Recorded 24.6.69. Transmitted 29.6.69

8. Travelling Riverside Blues 5:12 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, Robert Johnson)
"Top Gear"
Recorded 24.6.69. Transmitted 29.6.69

9. Whole Lotta Love 6:09 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, Willie Dixon)
"Top Gear"
Recorded 24.6.69. Transmitted 29.6.69

10. Somethin' Else 2:06 (Sharon Sheeley, Bob Cochran)
"Chris Grant's Tasty Pop Sundae"
Recorded 16.6.69. Transmitted 22.6.69
Money Honey Music/Robert Cochran Music, adm. by EMI Unart Catalog Inc, BMI)

11. Communication Breakdown 3:05 (Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham)
"One Night Stand" - Playhouse Theatre.
Recorded 27.6.69. Transmitted 10.8.69

12. I Can't Quit You Baby 6:21 (Willie Dixon)
"One Night Stand" - Playhouse Theatre.
Recorded 27.6.69. Transmitted 10.8.69
(Hoochie Coochie Music. BMI, adm. by Bug Music)

13. You Shook Me 10:19 (Willie Dixon, J.B. Lenoir)
"One Night Stand" - Playhouse Theatre.
Recorded 27.6.69. Transmitted 10.8.69
(Arc Music/Hoochie Coochie Music. BMI, adm. by Bug Music)

14. How Many More Times 11:51 (Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham)
Contains sample from 'the Lemon Song' by Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, Chester Burnett) published by Arc MusicCorp., BMI/Sunflower Music Inc, ASCAP
"One Night Stand" - Playhouse Theatre.
Recorded 27.6.69. Transmitted 10.8.69

CD TWO
1. Immigrant Song 3:20 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant)

2. Heartbreaker 5:16 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham)

3. Since I've Been Loving You 6:56 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones)
Not transmitted

4. Black Dog 5:17 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones)
Not transmitted

5. Dazed And Confused 18:36 (Jimmy Page)

6. Stairway To Heaven 8:49 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant)

7. Going To California 3:54 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant)

8. That's The Way 5:43 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant)

9. Whole Lotta Love (Medley) 13:45 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham and Willie Dixon)
'Boogie Chillun'
'Fixin' To Die'
'that's Alright Mama'
'A Mess Of Blues
Contains samples from 'Boogie Chillun' by John Lee Hooker, Bernard Besman, published by La Cienega Music Company. BMI; 'Fixin' To Die' by Bukka White, published by MCA Music Publishing, a division of Universal Studios Inc, ASCAP; 'that's Alright Mama' by Arthur Crudup, published by Unichappell Music Inc/Crudup Music. All rights admin. by Unichappell Music Inc, BMI; 'A Mess Of Blues' by Doc Pomus, Mort Shuman, published by Elvis Presley Music, admin. by R&H Music World, BMI

10. Thank You 6:37 (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant)
Not transmitted

All songs on CD 2 recorded at the Paris Theatre, London 1.4.71 - 'In Concert' (Unedited)
All songs published by Superhype Publishing Inc. All rights administered by WB Music Corp, ASCAP unless otherwise indicated.

Length: 138:58

Artwork/Design: Andie Airfix at Sartori.
Research: Ross Halfin.
Photography: Chris Walter/Photo Features; Penny Smith; Christian Rose, Barry Plummer; Jean Pierre Leloir; Claude Gassian; Hugh Crymble; Dick Barnet/Redferns

Compilation and Mastering: Jimmy Page
Mastering engineer: Jon Astley

BBC Sessions

BBC Sessions
[Click above for album images]

Led Zeppelin's BBC Sessions were among the most popular bootleg items of the rock & roll era, appearing on a myriad of illegal records and CDs. They were all the more popular because of the lack of official Led Zeppelin live albums, especially since The Song Remains the Same failed to capture the essence of the band. For anyone that hadn't heard the recordings, the mystique of Zeppelin's BBC Sessions was somewhat mystifying, but the official 1997 release of the double-disc BBC Sessions offered revelations for any fan who hadn't yet heard this music. While some collectors will be dismayed by the slight trimming on the Whole Lotta Love Medley almost all of the group's sessions are included here, and they prove why live Zeppelin was the stuff of legend.

The 1969 sessions, recorded shortly after the release of the first album, are fiery and dynamic, outstripping the studio record for sheer power. Early versions of You Shook Me, Communication Breakdown, What Is & What Should Never Be and "Whole Lotta Love" hit harder than their recorded counterparts, while covers of Sleepy John Estes' The Girl I Love She Got Long Black Wavy Hair, Robert Johnson's Travelling Riverside Blues and Eddie Cochran's Something Else are welcome additions to the Zeppelin catalog, confirming their folk, blues and rockabilly roots as well as their sense of vision.

Zeppelin's grand vision comes into sharper relief on the second disc, which is comprised of their 1971 session. They still have their primal energy, but they're more adventurous, branching out into folk, twisted psychedelia, and weird blues-funk. Certainly, BBC Sessions is the kind of album that will only appeal to fans, but anyone who's ever doubted Zeppelin's power or vision will be set straight with this record.
~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

Included in this 2-CD set is an essay, written by Luis Rey, that can be found here.

Statistics

Released:
Nov. 18, 1997 (US)
Nov. 17, 1997 (UK)

Chart Position:
#12 (US) #23 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Dec. 16, 1997
Multi Platinum: 2x Aug. 7, 2001

Tracks

CD ONE
1. You Shook Me
2. I Can't Quit You Baby
3. Communication Breakdown
4. Dazed And Confused
5. The Girl I Love (She Got Long Black Wavy Hair)
6. What Is And What Should Never Be
7. Communication Breakdown
8. Travelling Riverside Blues
9. Whole Lotta Love
10. Somethin' Else
11. Communication Breakdown
12. I Can't Quit You Baby
13. You Shook Me
14. How Many More Times

CD TWO
1. Immigrant Song
2. Heartbreaker
3. Since I've Been Loving You
4. Black Dog
5. Dazed And Confused
6. Stairway To Heaven
7. Going To California
8. That's The Way
9. Whole Lotta Love (Medley)
10. Thank You
Quick Fact

Another session was recorded on Friday, March 21, 1969 by the BBC. The band recorded Communication Breakdown at 5:45PM in Studio G of the BBC Lime Grove Studios.

After being transmitted that night at 10:50PM, the master tapes were wiped.

The Song Remains The Same Liner Notes

LED ZEPPELIN - THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME

The exact city has faded, but the isolated moment is still clear. Somewhere on the East Coast during Led Zeppelin's most recent tour of America, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones and Robert Plant were speeding from the stage to their touring plane. Now, heading down the runway to the next stop, they collapsed in exhausted heaps around the on-board video tape machine.

Little Richard was on the screen, bashing his piano keys, rocking the bandstand and howling "Tutti Frutti" in the 1957 classic film The Girl Can't Help It. Page watched, took a weary slug of Jack Daniels and began to grin. "You know somthing?", he toasted. "No escaping our roots."

Three years later, with that credo very much in mind, Led Zeppelin have released a feature film of their own. The Song Remains The Same captures all the power and force of a Led Zeppelin concert from the ultimate vantage point. The view is from the second row, the sound as if the viewer were on stage. A multiple track playback sends the music from every direction of the theatre.

The tension takes hold immediately. The opening moments of The Song Remains The Same show the band gather in Britain, fly to the States, and pile into cars that will take them to a long-packed Madison Square Garden in the heart of New York City. The pace accelerates; there is no chance to rest. They hurtle down the freeways; and then Zeppelin is on stage, tearing into the music, from "Rock And Roll" to "Whole Lotta Love"; it is some of their most blazing live material. Peter Clifton and Joe Massot have admirably captured the total event on celluloid. For the first time, a Led Zeppelin performance is not just a memory. The film as well as this soundtrack, can be experienced again and again.

The film, though, is much more than a movie of Led Zeppelin in concert; it is a rare series of glimpses into the visions and symbolism of the men who make the music. Fulfilling a long-held desire to express themselves in a cinematic setting, each band member and manager Peter Grant, have contributed their own "fantasy sequence". For the first time, one can view the images in Page's mind during "Dazed And Confused", see life breathed into "Stairway To Heaven"...

It would be impossible to detail those sequences here. The band has never really discussed their concepts or reasons. Now it's easy to see why. It's been quite a ride since that first album was released in late '68, inventing a new repertoire, raw and brimming with fresh ideas and explorations into rock.

Since then, Zeppelin's made six more albums, resulting in an ever-increasing legion of followers, whose loyalty can only be described as staggering, whilst the group record and live their music from L.A. to Kasmir. Now, their first adventure into cinema, The Song Remains The Same, is cinematic proof that amidst it all, while living the reflections of their music, they have neither forgotten nor denied that original premise - The Roots.

The Song Remains The Same More Info

The Song Remains The Same THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME
Swan Song SS 2-201 (U.S.) / SSK 89402 (U.K.) [1976]
Rhino / WEA Catalog No. 328252 [2007]
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion
John Paul Jones: Bass, Electric Piano, Mellotron

1976 Release
1. Rock And Roll 4:03 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
2. Celebration Day 3:49 (Page/Plant/Jones)
3. The Song Remains The Same 6:00 (Page/Plant)
4. The Rain Song 8:25 (Page/Plant)
5. Dazed And Confused 26:53 (Page)
6. No Quarter 12:30 (Page/Plant/Jones)
7. Stairway To Heaven 10:58 (Page/Plant)
8. Moby Dick 12:47 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
9. Whole Lotta Love 14:25 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)

Length: 99:45

Recorded in July 27-29, 1973 at Madison Square Garden, New York, New York.

Engineered by: Eddie Kramer
Mixed at: Electric Ladyland, New York, New York on April 1975 and Trident Studios, London on August 1976.

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Sleeve by: Hipgnosis / Hardie

2007 Release
DISC ONE
1. Rock And Roll 3:56 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones)
2. Celebration Day 3:37 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones)
3. Black Dog 3:46 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones)
4. Over The Hills And Far Away 6:11 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant)
5. Misty Mountain Hop 4:43 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones)
6. Since I've Been Loving You 8:23 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones)
7. No Quarter 10:38 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones)
8. The Song Remains The Same 5:39 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant)
9. The Rain Song 8:20 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant)
10. The Ocean 5:13 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones/John Bonham)

DISC TWO
1. Dazed And Confused 29:18 (Jimmy Page)
2. Stairway To Heaven 10:53 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant)
3. Moby Dick 11:02 (John Bonham/John Paul Jones/Jimmy Page)
4. Heartbreaker 6:19 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones/John Bonham)
5. Whole Lotta Love 13:51 (Jimmy Page/Robert Plant/John Paul Jones/John Bonham/Willie Dixon)

Length: 131:49

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant
Recorded live at Madison Square Garden by Eddie Kramer
Mixed at Metropolis Studios, London, by Kevin Shirley
Mastered by Bob Ludwig, Gateway Mastering, Portland, ME.
Sleeve by Hipgnosis/Hardie
Reissue Design by Peter Halm

Original soundtrack from the film
"The Song Remains The Same"
A Swan Song Inc. Production
A Warner Bros. Inc., Motion Picture

The Song Remains The Same

The Song Remains The Same (1976)
[Click above for album images]

Ever since Royal Albert Hall on January 9, 1970, Led Zeppelin had a select few concerts professionally filmed. Until 2003's DVD, this was the only official video release that Zeppelin fans had to sink their teeth into.

All three nights, July 27, 28 and 29, 1973 were filmed and recorded and later mixed down by Eddie Kramer at Electric Ladyland Studios. More filming was to be done on their 1975 World Tour, but that never happened due to Plant's accident in Rhodes in August 1975. This soundtrack contains most of the songs that were located on the video/DVD. Black Dog and Since I've Been Loving You were songs from the movie that did not make it to the soundtrack.

There is some criticism that this another example of the 1970s excess and that it is not a true live album due to the fact that the movie and the soundtrack and made up of the three nights spliced together, however the official word is that, besides the music, there is very little splicing done with the lyrics, merely to correct cracks and mistakes in Plant's voice.

Included in the soundtrack is an essay, written by Cameron Crowe, that can be found here.

Statistics

Released:
1976 Release
Oct. 22, 1976 (US)
Oct. 22, 1976 (UK)

2007 Release
Nov. 20, 2007 (US)
Nov. 19, 2007 (UK)

Chart Position:
1976 Release
#2 (US) #1 (UK)

2007 Release
#11 (US) #73 (UK)

Certified:
1976 Release
Gold: Nov. 3, 1976
Multi Platinum: 4x Feb. 5, 1997

2007 Release
Gold: Feb. 5, 1997
Platinum: 4x Feb. 5, 1997

Tracks

1976 Release
1. Rock And Roll
2. Celebration Day
3. The Song Remains The Same
4. The Rain Song
5. Dazed And Confused
6. No Quarter
7. Stairway To Heaven
8. Moby Dick
9. Whole Lotta Love


2007 Release
DISC ONE
1. Rock And Roll
2. Celebration Day
3. Black Dog (inc. Bring It On Home)
4. Over The Hills
5. Misty Mountain Hop
6. Since I've Been Loving You
7. No Quarter
8. The Song Remains The Same
9. The Rain Song
10. The Ocean
DISC TWO
1. Dazed And Confused
2. Stairway To Heaven
3. Moby Dick
4. Heartbreaker
5. Whole Lotta Love
Quick Fact

A stage replica was constructed at Shepperton Studios in August 1974 to re-shoot some close-up shots that were missed last July during filming.

Those with a trained eye will notice it is the Shepperton footage because of Page's shorter hair and Plant's capped teeth.

"Everything was reassembled from the ground up. The original soundtrack lives only in the old version, which is almost an excuse for having both because there are two different versions now. The new version is newly assembled audio. That's why when Warner Bros. says it's 'remastered,' that's not really descriptive, it's re-done. As Jimmy says, 'It's been revisited,' which is about as accurate as you can get." -- Kevin Shirley (2007)

Coda More Info

CODA
Swan Song 9 00511 (U.S.) / 79 00511 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Sub Octivider, Acoustic Guitar, Electronic Treatments
Robert Plant: Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Drum Orchestra
John Paul Jones: Bass, Keyboards, Piano

1. We're Gonna Groove 2:36 (Ben E. King/James Bethea)
Recorded on Jun. 25, 1969 at Morgan Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
2. Poor Tom 3:03 (Page/Plant)
Recorded on May 6, 1970 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
3. I Can't Quit You Baby 4:16 (Willie Dixon)
Recorded during sound rehearsal on January 9, 1970 at the Royal Albert Hall, London. Engineered by Vic Maille with the Pye Mobile Truck.
4. Walter's Walk 4:24 (Page/Plant)
Recorded on May 15, 1972 with The Rolling Stones Mobile at Stargroves. Engineered by Eddie Kramer.
5. Ozone Baby 3:35 (Page/Plant)
Recorded on November 14, 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden. Engineered by Leif Masses.
6. Darlene 5:04 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded on November 16, 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden. Engineered by Leif Masses.
7. Bonzo's Montreux 4:15 (Bonham)
John Bonham Drum Orchestra. Jimmy Page - electronic treatments. Recorded on September 12, 1976 at Mountain Studios, Montreux, Switzerland. Engineered by John Timperly.
8. Wearing And Tearing 5:27 (Page/Plant)
Recorded on November 21, 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm. Engineered by Leif Masses.

Length: 33:04

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

All tracks mixed at The Sol Studio, Cookham, Berkshire.
Engineer: Stuart Epps

Sleeve by: Hipgnosis / Assorted Images

1990 CD Mastering: Barry Diament
Remastering: George Marino

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISCS

1. We're Gonna Groove (Alternate mix) 2:40 (Bethea/King)
2. If It Keeps On Raining ("When the Levee Breaks") (Rough mix) 4:11 (Bonham/Jones/Memphis Minnie/Page/Plant)
3. Bonzo's Montreux (Mix construction in progress) 4:57 (Bonham)
4. Baby Come On Home 4:30 (Berns/Page/Plant)
5. Sugar Mama (mix) (Led Zeppelin outtake) 2:50 (Page/Plant)
6. Poor Tom (Instrumental mix) 2:16 (Page/Plant)
7. Travelling Riverside Blues (BBC Sessions) 5:08 (Johnson/Page/Plant)
8. Hey, Hey, What Can I Do 3:52 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)

1. Four Hands ("Four Sticks") (Bombay Orchestra) 4:43 (Page/Plant)
2. Friends (Bombay Orchestra) 4:25 (Page/Plant)
3. St. Tristan's Sword (Rough mix) (Led Zeppelin III outtake) 5:40 (Page)
4. Desire ("The Wanton Song") (Rough mix) 4:08 (Page/Plant)
5. Bring It On Home (Rough mix) 2:32 (Dixon)
6. Walter's Walk (Rough mix) 3:18 (Page/Plant)
7. Everybody Makes It Through ("In The Light") (Rough mix) 8:31 (Jones/Page/Plant)

Length: 1:04:02

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

Coda

Coda
[Click above for album images]

Consisting of unreleased leftovers put out to fulfill contract obligations after the band’s breakup, Coda should be purchased only after obtaining all of the band’s other original albums. That said, these songs are pretty damn good for a bunch of rejects, though my guess is that none of them would qualify for your Led Zeppelin mix tape. Considering that the album barely passes the 33-minute mark and consists of a mere eight songs, it would also be nice to see the three previously unavailable songs from the box set tacked onto a future reissue, which would give the band’s fans more bang for their buck while also boosting this album’s stock considerably.

However, as for what’s already here, their cover of B.B. King's We're Gonna Groove and their own Wearing And Tearing both rock hard and well, Walters Walk and Ozone Baby are garage rockers bashed out with plenty of energy and enthusiasm, and Darlene is a funky 1950s-styled rocker. Though none of the material here is first rate, it certainly is well played, and it’s good to hear Bonham pound away one last time. Bonham's showcase tune Bonzo’s Montreux is quite enjoyable, as is the Led Zeppelin III-styled folk rocker Poor Tom, though I Can’t Quit You Baby doesn’t seem completely necessary a second time around. Like I said before, this isn’t an essential Led Zeppelin release, but fans who already love this great band will be likely glad that they own it.
Statistics

Released:
Nov. 19, 1982 (US)
Nov. 22, 1982 (UK)
Jul. 31, 2015 (Reissue)


Chart Position:
#6 (US) #4 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Feb. 7, 1983
Platinum: Feb. 7, 1983

Tracks

1. We're Gonna Groove
2. Poor Tom
3. I Can't Quit You Baby
4. Walter's Walk
5. Ozone Baby
6. Darlene
7. Bonzo's Montreux
8. Wearing And Tearing


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISCS
1. We're Gonna Groove (Alternate Mix)
2. If It Keeps On Raining ("When The Levee Breaks") (Rough Mix)
3. Bonzo's Montreux (Mix Construction in Progress)
4. Baby Come On Home
5. Sugar Mama (Mix)
6. Poor Tom (Instrumental Mix)
7. Travelling Riverside Blues
8. Hey Hey What Can I Do

1. Four Hands ("Four Sticks") (Bombay Orchestra)
2. Friends (Bombay Orchestra)
3. St. Tristan's Sword (Rough Mix)
4. Desire ("The Wanton Song") (Rough Mix)
5. Bring It On Home (Rough Mix)
6. Walter's Walk (Rough Mix)
7. Everybody Makes It Through ("In The Light") (Rough Mix)
Quick Fact

The 34 photos that appear on the inside of the gatefold cover span Led Zeppelin's entire career, suggesting that this is a "Best Of" album without really saying so.

In Through The Out Door More Info

IN THROUGH THE OUT DOOR
Swan Song SS 16002 (U.S.) / SSK 59410 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
John Bonham: Drums, Percussion
John Paul Jones: Bass, Synthesizer, Piano

1. In The Evening 6:48 (Jones/Page/Plant)
2. South Bound Saurez 4:11 (Jones/Plant)
3. Fool In The Rain 6:08 (Page/Plant/Jones)
4. Hot Dog 3:15 (Page/Plant)
5. Carouselambra 10:28 (Jones/Page/Plant)
6. All My Love 5:51 (Jones/Plant)
7. I'm Gonna Crawl 5:28 (Jones/Plant)

Length: 42:25

Recorded in Nov./Dec. 1978 at Polar Studios, Stockholm, Sweden.
Engineered by: Leif Masses
Assistant Engineer: Lennart Ostlund
Mixed at: Plumpton Studios, Sussex.

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Designed by: Aubrey Powell
Sleeve by: Hipgnosis

1990 CD Mastering: Barry Diament
Remastering: George Marino

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. In the Evening (Rough mix) 6:54 (Jones/Page/Plant)
2. Southbound Piano ("South Bound Saurez") (Rough mix) 4:14 (Page/Plant)
3. Fool in the Rain (Rough mix) 6:13 (Jones/Page/Plant)
4. Hot Dog (Rough mix) 3:17 (Page/Plant)
5. The Epic ("Carouselambra") (Rough mix) 10:48 (Jones/Page/Plant)
6. The Hook ("All My Love") (Rough mix) 5:52 (Page/Plant)
7. Blot ("I'm Gonna Crawl") (Rough mix) 5:31 (Jones/Page/Plant)

Length: 42:49

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

In Through The Out Door

In Through The Out Door
[Click above for album images]

After a three-year lapse between releases that was caused in part by the tragic death of Plant’s son Karac, Led Zeppelin’s final studio album was a significant departure from anything that had come before it. More than any other Zeppelin album this one belongs to John Paul Jones, who co-wrote all but one song, and gave the synthesizer/piano parts a major presence. The album begins with the eerie effects and powerful guitar swirl of In The Evening, which also contains a cocky Plant vocal that confidently told the punk pretenders (who had cropped up in the band’s absence and who were supposed to render older rockers such as Led Zeppelin irrelevant) who was still boss. South Bound Saurez is an upbeat piano rocker highlighted by Page’s guitar solo and some sunny “sha la la” harmonies, while the #21 (in US charts) single Fool In The Rain presented more catchy piano pop while also creatively making use of the studio.

Hot Dog is a barrelhouse Texas rocker and the 10+ minute Carouselambra is rather low-key compared to past epics. It’s still a solid song with a bright synthesizer melody, but it definitely doesn't completely warrant its long running time. All Of My Love continues the album with a pretty, if somewhat schmaltzy, song that registers due to the band’s beautifully understated playing and Plant’s heartfelt vocals, while I’m Gonna Crawl enjoyably closes the album with a slow, confident blues performance, albeit one that still features modern synthesizers most prominently.

In short, this album was an enjoyable affair that saw the veteran band keeping pace with the snarling young punk upstarts by, ironically enough, toning things down. Yet Zeppelin’s slicker new sound was notably less powerful than on previous albums, and though the band was still very relevant they were no longer revelatory. Ironically, John Bonham’s death by asphyxiation and Led Zeppelin’s subsequent breakup prevented the band from hanging around past their prime, leaving an untarnished musical legacy.

Statistics

Released:
Aug. 15, 1979 (US)
Aug. 20, 1979 (UK)
Jul. 31, 2015 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Jan. 7, 1980
Multi Platinum: 6x Nov. 25, 1999

Tracks

1. In The Evening
2. South Bound Saurez
3. Fool In The Rain
4. Hot Dog
5. Carouselambra
6. All My Love
7. I'm Gonna Crawl

,br /> DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. In The Evening (Rough Mix)
2. Southbound Piano ("South Bound Saurez") (Rough Mix)
3. Fool In The Rain (Rough Mix)
4. Hot Dog (Rough Mix)
5. The Epic ("Carouselambra") (Rough Mix)
6. The Hook ("All My Love") (Rough Mix)
7. Blot ("I'm Gonna Crawl") (Rough Mix)
Quick Fact

All six of the album covers, both the front and back side, are of the same scene, but with a completely different perspective.

When released, the sleeve covers were prepared so that if exposed to warm water, their colors change.

Presence 'The Object'

by: Rick Barrett

I get LOTS of questions about the famous statue that was on the cover of Led Zeppelin's Presence album, which is called "The Object". Hopefully this feature will give some background on it and answer some questions that commonly arise!

First of all, after Hipgnosis designed the Presence album cover, in which The Object was painted into the various scenes, Led Zeppelin had real Objects produced. That's what was used to photograph the album's black and white inner sleeves. Shortly thereafter, Alva Museum Graphics in New York was contracted to produce 1000 individually numbered 12" tall black Objects for Swan Song to use in their promotion of the record. On the base of each Object was imprinted the following on four sides:

1) LED ZEPPELIN (1/4" tall lettering)
2) "THE OBJECT" c 1976 SWAN SONG INC (VERY small lettering)
3) PRESENCE (1/4" tall lettering)
4) ____/1000 (The individual number was here; this information was etched by hand onto each Object

The originals came in brown cardboard boxes taped shut with brown paper filament tape. On the side of each box was a flat white sticker with "The Object" and "Copyright 1976 Swan Song" written in red. Some boxes have the number of the Object inside written in black magic marker on the outside of the box, on top. These brown cardboard boxes were nothing fancy; without the sticker it was just a plain brown cardboard box. When opened, one could see that The Object was packed in a brownish padded blanket of sorts...like those padded mailers filled with that shredded newspaper stuff. (Originals were NOT packaged with bubble wrap, and the cardboard boxes did NOT originally come shrink wrapped.) This is the only way and the only time The Object was ever released by Swan Song/Atlantic Records.

In the late 1970's-early 1980's, somewhere in the vicinity of 500 reproductions were made. Seems like there were lots more than that, but this is fact. There WERE many variations of the bogus Objects and they were all from the same source. None of the repros were numbered higher than 650 if memory serves me well, though there was one numbered 666! I do recall that there happened to be an overlap of some numbers on the fakes. I doubt there are any more than three of the same number on any of the repros. The numbering of these were done by hand, but they were not done chronologically; it seemed like whatever suited the bootleggers at the time was the norm. Most of the first run of repros had some cheap green felt on the bottom of The Object; subsequent ones were just plain black bottomed.

The differences between the originals and the 1980’s reproductions are as follows:

1) Originals: flat black paint;
Repros: glossy or semi-gloss black paint

2) Originals: very smooth sides and base; little or no imperfections
Repros: bulges and pits were prevelant, though not all that noticeable from a fair distance away; various flaws abound...brush marks from the paint, difficult to read etchings on the base, bulging top edge

3) Originals: underneath the thin coat of paint, a flesh-color appears IF a scratch or chip is not very deep; if deep then white shows through
Repros: Only a white color shows through if scratched or chipped

A REAL Object is on the left in all of these photos; a reproduction Object from the 1980’s is on the right:


**Both Originals and Repros were made of a hard plaster called hydrocale, and weighed the same. The originals were made of a higher quality material, which is one reason why there are less flaws than the hastily produced fakes. Both are also the same height.

It is fairly safe to say that once one has seen an original Object, then you'll always be able to tell the difference between genuine and fakes. The differences are subtle enough for some to have been fooled by bootleg ones. Original Objects are not easy to find; most people who have them seem to want to keep them. Unlike many Zep items that seem to just appeal to hardcore Zeppelin fans, there are a LOT of music fans and collectors of promo items that want or have an Object. Real ones in an unopened box are becoming very rare; most people that get them open them up! I can't tell you how many people opened ones that we sold when we had a batch in the early 90's; one of our foreign customers had the unfortunate experience of having their original Object in the box opened by a Customs agent.

Finally, there has been another incarnation of reproduction Objects, manufactured by an artist in Oregon. These are very easy to tell from both the originals and reproduction Objects from a several decades ago because they have very rounded edges, are lighter in weight, and are usually numbered 310/1000.


The Object is a REALLY cool item; it's a GREAT conversation piece in any room and is quite an attention getter on a coffee table or shelf. If you're looking for an Object, good luck in your search!

If you have any questions about Led Zeppelin memorabilia or would like to contact Rick Barrett, just email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Presence More Info

PRESENCE
Swan Song SS 8416 (U.S.) / SSK 59402 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums
John Paul Jones: Bass, Keyboards

1. Achilles Last Stand 10:26 (Page/Plant)
2. For Your Life 6:21 (Page/Plant)
3. Royal Orleans 2:58 (Bohnam/Jones/Page/Plant)
4. Nobody's Fault But Mine 6:15 (Page/Plant)
5. Candy Store Rock 4:10 (Page/Plant)
6. Hots On For Nowhere 4:42 (Page/Plant)
7. Tea For One 9:27 (Page/Plant)

Length: 44:25

Recorded and mixed on Nov. 9-27, 1975 at Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany
Engineered and mixed by: Keith Harwood
Tape Engineer: Jeremy Gee

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Sleeve by: Hipgnosis and George Hardie

"The Object" ©1976 Swan Song Inc.
All rights reserved. Used by permission.

1990 CD Mastering: Barry Diament
Remastering: George Marino

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. Two Ones Are Won ("Achilles Last Stand") (Reference mix) 10:28 (Page/Plant)
2. For Your Life (Reference mix) 6:28 (Page/Plant)
3. 10 Ribs & All/Carrot Pod Pod (Reference Mix) 6:49 (Jones/Page)
4. Royal Orleans (Reference mix) 3:00 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
5. Hots On for Nowhere (Reference mix) 4:44 (Page/Plant)

Length: 31:32

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

Presence

Presence
[Click above for album images]

This is the forgotten Led Zeppelin album, largely because it features less memorable material than any of their other albums. Hastily recorded after the massive success of Physical Graffiti, this album was rushed together before they had gathered the customary allotment of first-rate material. That said, Presence is still a damn good album whose relatively simple songs are driven by powerful performances.

For example, Robert Plant, whose voice has grown rougher over the years, gives a compelling, stuttered vocal performance on Nobody's Fault But Mine, an excellent, hard rocking song in part due to some uncredited help from Blind Willie Johnson. Other highlights include For Your Life and Hots On For Nowhere, which feature strutting riffs and funky backbeats, with the latter adding a catchy “la la la” chorus as well.

The band remains an amazing instrumental unit, and though their reliance on overly repetitive song structures marks Presence as something of a placeholder release, Page still grabs many a great guitar part from his resourceful bag of tricks. Granted, Royal Orleans is forgettable, and the slow, understated blues of Tea For One is interminable, but Achilles Last Stand stands as one of the bands most powerful epics. In fact, this 10 minute track alone is worth the price of admission, led by its unwavering groove, a particularly haunting Plant vocal, and several show stopping give and take segments between Page and Bonham. During these thrilling exchanges, Bonham's volcanic drum fills interlock with Page's wailing guitar parts, seizing several moments of tension that build to the bursting point.

And, oh yeah, what's up with that statue?
Statistics

Released:
Mar. 31, 1976 (US)
Apr. 5, 1976 (UK)
Jul. 31, 2015 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Apr. 1, 1976
Multi Platinum: 3x Nov. 25, 1997

Tracks

1. Achilles Last Stand
2. For Your Life
3. Royal Orleans
4. Nobody's Fault But Mine
5. Candy Store Rock
6. Hots On For Nowhere
7. Tea For One


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. Two Ones Are Won ("Achilles Last Stand") (Reference Mix)
2. For Your Life (Reference Mix)
3. 10 Ribs & All/Carrot Pod Pod (Pod) (Reference Mix)
4. Royal Orleans (Reference Mix)
5. Hots On For Nowhere (Reference Mix)
Quick Fact

This is the only studio album without any keyboards in the songs.

The completion of Presence just prior to Thanksgiving prompted Jimmy to suggest "Thanksgiving" as an album title.

Physical Graffiti 64 Windows

Physical Graffiti Sleeve 1
A nun, ?, ?, ?, Charles Atlas
?, Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra, ? , Jimmy Page
A Zeppelin blimp, ?, ?, ?
John Bonham & Robert Plant, Jerry Lee Lewis, ?, The Queen

Physical Graffiti Sleeve 2
King Kong, Robert Plant, ?, ?, ?
?, Some indians or Aztecs, Lee Harvey Oswald, John Bonham
?, Jimmy Page, An old lady, ?
Someone and an ape (!), A lady in her kitchen, A group of what appears to be naked Bonzo look-a-likes..., The Queen
Physical Graffiti Sleeve 3
Planes, Peter Grant, Marlene Dietrich, ?, Neil Armstrong
?, John Bonham, ?, ?
A horse, An indian guru of some sort?, A religious looking painting, ?, Two children, Scene from an old movie, ?, John Bonham, The Queen
Physical Graffiti Sleeve 4
?, A cat, A foot on a doll, ?
John Paul Jones, ?, John Bonham, Robert Plant & Roy Harper
A cowboy, Robert Plant, The Virgin Mary, a medieval looking painting, An angel
A woman putting on stockings, Jimmy Page with someone who is obviously a Buddhist, Jimmy Page & John Paul Jones, The Queen

Physical Graffiti More Info

PHYSICAL GRAFFITI
Swan Song SS 2-200 (U.S.) / SSK 89400 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Pedal Steel Guitar, Backing Vocal
Robert Plant: Lead Vocal, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Tympani, Backing Vocal
John Paul Jones: Bass, Mellotron, Synthesiser, Organ, Grand Piano, Synthesiser Piano, Synthesised Bass, Backing Vocal
Ian Stewart: Piano on Boogie With Stu

Disc One
1. Custard Pie 4:20 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
2. The Rover 5:44 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves by Eddie Kramer, in the garden, with The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London. Guitar lost courtesy Nevison. Salvaged by the grace of Harwood.
3. In My Time Of Dying 11:08 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
4. Houses Of The Holy 4:01 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz. Mixdown in June 1972 by Eddie Kramer at Electric Lady, New York.
5. Trampled Under Foot 5:38 (Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
6. Kashmir 8:31 (Bonham/Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

Disc Two
1. In The Light 8:46 (Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
2. Bron-Yr-Aur 2:07 (Page)
Recorded in Jul. 1970 by Andy Johns, Island Studios, London. Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
3. Down By The Seaside 5:15 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Feb 1971 by Andy Johns, Island Studios, London. Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
4. Ten Years Gone 6:55 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
5. Night Flight 3:37 (Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Andy Johns with The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Overdubs in Feb. 1971 by Andy Johns, Island Studios, London. Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
6. The Wanton Song 4:10 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
7. Boogie With Stu 3:45 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant/Ian Stewart/Mrs. Valens)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire by Andrew Johns with The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
8. Black Country Woman 4:30 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves by Eddie Kramer, in the garden with The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.
9. Sick Again 4:40 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan-Feb 1974 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Mixed by Ron Nevison with Ronnie Lane's Mobile Studio. Overdubs & Mixdown in Oct. 1974 by Keith Harwood, Olympic Studios, London.

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Package Concept and Design: AGI - Mike Doud, London / Peter Corriston, NY
Photography: Elliot Erwitt, B.P. Fallen, Roy Harper
Tinting Extraordinaire: Maurice Tate
Window Illustration: Dave Heffernan

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. Brandy & Coke ("Trampled Under Foot") (Initial/Rough Mix) 5:38 (Jones/Page/Plant)
2. Sick Again (Early Version) 2:20 (Page/Plant)
3. In My Time of Dying (Initial/Rough Mix) 10:45 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
4. Houses of the Holy (Rough Mix with Overdubs) 3:51 (Page/Plant)
5. Everybody Makes It Through ("In the Light") (Early Version/In Transit) 6:29 (Jones/Page/Plant)
6. Boogie with Stu (Sunset Sound Mix) 3:36 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant/Stewart)
7. Driving Through Kashmir ("Kashmir") (Rough Orchestra Mix) 8:33 (Bonham/Page/Plant)

Length: 41:29

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

Physical Graffiti

Physical Graffiti
[Click above for album images]

Jimmy Page's desire for a double album resulted in Physical Graffiti. A majority of the tracks were recorded in 1974 at Headley Grange. The remainder were leftover tracks that didnt make it to previous albums. Houses Of The Holy was recorded in 1972, obviously as the title track for that album, at Olympic Studios. Black Country Woman and The Rover were recorded at the same time as D'Yer Mak'er. Bron-Y-Aur was originally recorded for Led Zeppelin III.

An amazing feat to note was that when Physical Grafitti hit the stores in 1975, all previous Zeppelin albums were still in the Top 100 charts.

Physical Graffiti featured no less than seven tracks with John Paul Jones at the keyboard. It also was one of the first rock albums to capture a major string section on one of its tracks (Kashmir).
Statistics

Released:
Feb. 24, 1975 (US)
Feb. 24, 1975 (UK)
Feb. 23, 2015(Reissue)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Mar. 6, 1975
Multi Platinum: 16x Jan. 30, 2006
Diamond Award: Nov. 15, 1999

Tracks

1. Custard Pie
2. The Rover
3. In My Time Of Dying
4. Houses Of The Holy
5. Trampled Under Foot
6. Kashmir
7. In The Light
8. Bron-Yr-Aur
9. Down By The Seaside
10. Ten Years Gone
11. Night Flight
12. The Wanton Song
13. Boogie With Stu
14. Black Country Woman
15. Sick Again


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. Brandy & Coke ("Trampled Under Foot") (Initial/Rough Mix)
2. Sick Again (Early Version)
3. In My Time Of Dying (Initial/Rough Mix)
4. Houses Of The Holy (Rough Mix with Overdubs)
5. Everybody Makes it Through ("In The Light") (Early Version/In Transit)
6. Boogie With Stu (Sunset Sound Mix)
7. Driving Through Kashmir ("Kashmir") (Rough Orchestra Mix)
Quick Fact

The building on the cover of 97 St. Marks Place in New York City. The actual building has one more story that was cut off for the album cover.

There are 64 windows in the four sleves to the album, each of which have a picture in it. Physical Graffiti bears a striking resemblance to Jose Feliciano's 1973 album Compartments and a vague resemblance to the Rolling Stone's 1978 album Some Girls.

Houses Of The Holy More Info

HOUSES OF THE HOLY
Atlantic SD 7255 (U.S.) / K 50014 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Backing Vocals
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals
John Bonham: Drums, Backing Vocals
John Paul Jones: Bass, Mellotron, Synthesiser, Organ, Grand Piano, Synthesiser Piano, Synthesised Bass, Backing Vocals

1. The Song Remains The Same 5:24 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios with Keith Harwood.
2. The Rain Song 7:32 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios with Keith Harwood.
3. Over The Hills And Far Away 4:42 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in June 1972 at Electric Lady, New York, with Eddie Kramer.
4. The Crunge 3:10 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in June 1972 at Electric Lady, New York, with Eddie Kramer.
5. Dancing Days 3:40 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in June 1972 at Electric Lady, New York, with Eddie Kramer.
6. D'yer Mak'er 4:19 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in June 1972 at Electric Lady, New York, with Eddie Kramer.
7. No Quarter 6:57 (Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in May 1972 at Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
8. The Ocean 4:28 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Eddie Kramer. Mixed in June 1972 at Electric Lady, New York, with Eddie Kramer.

Length: 40:58

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Sleeve by: Hipgnosis
Photography: Aubrey Powell

1990 CD Mastering: Barry Diament
Remastering: George Marino 

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. The Song Remains the Same (Guitar overdub reference mix) 5:29 (Page/Plant)
2. The Rain Song (Mix minus piano) 7:45 (Page/Plant)
3.Over the Hills and Far Away (Guitar mix backing track) 4:22 (Page/Plant)
4. The Crunge (Rough mix - keys up) 3:16 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
5. Dancing Days (Rough mix with vocals) 3:46 (Page/Plant)
6. No Quarter (Rough mix with JPJ keyboard overdubs - No vocals) 7:03 (Jones/Page/Plant)
7. The Ocean (Working mix) 4:26 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)

Length: 36:10

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

Houses Of The Holy

Houses Of The Holy
[Click above for album images]

By the time Houses Of The Holy was released in stores in the Spring of 1973, Led Zeppelin was one of the top established bands in the world. On the first two days on their Summer 1973 US Tour, over 100,000 fans came to see them in concert.

By this time, they had been playing material from Houses Of The Holy for about six months in Japan, Australia and the UK. With Houses Of The Holy, the band branched out from the same styles from the four previous albums. D'yer Mak'er showed their interest in reggae, while The Crunge showed the funk style of the Jones-Bonham rhythm section. Epics like The Song Remains The Same and The Rain Song cemented Zeppelin's position as the number one act in the world.

Houses Of The Holy was the first album covered commissioned by the band from the firm Hipgnosis. According to Page, (The cover) "denoted the feeling of expectancy for the music contained within."
Statistics

Released:
Mar. 18, 1973 (US)
Mar. 26, 1973 (UK)
October 27, 2014 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Apr. 10, 1973
Multi Platinum: 11x Nov. 15, 1999
Diamond Award: Nov. 15, 1999

Tracks

1. The Song Remains The Same
2. The Rain Song
3. Over The Hills And Far Away
4. The Crunge
5. Dancing Days
6. D'yer Mak'er
7. No Quarter
8. The Ocean


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. The Song Remains The Same (Guitar Overdube Reference Mix)
2. The Rain Song (Mix Minus Piano)
3. Over The Hills And Far Away (Guitar Mix Backing Track)
4. The Crunge (Rough Mix - Keys Up)
5. Dancing Days (Rough Mix with Vocal)
6. No Quarter (Rough Mix with JPJ Keyboard Overdubs - No Vocal)
7. The Ocean (Working Mix)
Quick Fact

The scenic background for Houses Of The Holy is Northern Ireland's Giant's Causeway. It is thought that the causeway was created more than 60 million years ago as a result of intense volcanic activity.

The two children who modelled for the cover were siblings Stefan and Samanatha Gates.

72px-zoso More Info


Atlantic SD 7208 (U.S.) / 2401 012 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Mandolin
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Backing Vocals
John Paul Jones: Bass, Electric Piano, Synth, Backing Vocals
Ian Stewart: Piano on Rock And Roll
Sandy Denny appears on The Battle of Evermore courtesy of Island Records

1. Black Dog 4:55 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
2. Rock and Roll 3:40 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios and Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
3. The Battle of Evermore 5:38 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed at Olympic Studios with George Chkiantz.
4. Stairway To Heaven 7:55 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
5. Misty Mountain Hop 4:39 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
6. Four Sticks 4:49 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Feb. 1971 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
7. Going To California 3:36 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns. Mixed in Feb. 1971 at Olympic Studios, London, with Andy Johns.
8. When The Levee Breaks 7:08 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Memphis Minnie)
Recorded in Dec 1970-Jan 1971 at Headley Grange, Hampshire with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Engineered by Andy Johns.

Length: 42:25

Recorded and mixed in October 1971 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles
Engineered by Glyn Johns

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Illustration "The Hermit" by: Barrington Colby M O M
Design Co-ordination: Graphreaks

1990 CD Mastering: Joe Sidore
Remastering: George Marino 

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. Black Dog (Basic track with guitar overdubs) 4:34 (Jones/Page/Plant)
2. Rock And Roll (Alternate mix) 3:39 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
3. The Battle of Evermore (Mandolin/Guitar mix from Headley Grange) 4:13 (Page/Plant)
4. Stairway to Heaven (Sunset Sound mix) 8:03 (Page/Plant)
5. Misty Mountain Hop (Alternate mix) 4:45 (Jones/Page/Plant)
6. Four Sticks (Alternate mix) 4:33 (Page/Plant)
7. Going to California (Mandolin/Guitar mix) 3:34 (Page/Plant)
8. When the Levee Breaks (Alternate UK mix) 7:08 (Bonham/Jones/Minnie/Page/Plant)

Length: 40:32

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

72px-zoso Album Images

Untitled front

Untitled back

Untitled inside

Untitled sleeve front

Untitled sleeve back

Untitled

Untitled
[Click above for album images]

Also known as Led Zeppelin IV, Runes, Four Symbols and Zoso, this album extended Led Zeppelin's previous work. This album was recorded at an old workhouse known as Headley Grange. At one time, they were going to release the fourth album in 4 EPs, but, because of various delays, a single album was produced. Effortless confidence seeped through quality rockers like Black Dog and Rock And RollThe Battle Of Evermore and Going To California carried on the band's acoustic tradition as displayed in Led Zeppelin III. The merging of acoustics and electric styles ultimately resulted in Stairway To Heaven. When The Levee Breaks shows Bonham at his best. The opening drum beat of Levee has become one of the most sampled drum tracks, cutting across all genres.

At one time in the 1970s, Stairway recieved more airplay than any other song. It still is being played an estimated 4,200+ times per year.

Statistics

Released:
Nov. 8, 1971 (US)
Nov. 12, 1971 (UK)
October 27, 2014 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#2 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Nov. 16, 1971
Multi Platinum: 23x Jan. 30, 2006
Diamond Award: Nov. 15, 1999

Tracks

1. Black Dog
2. Rock And Roll
3. The Battle Of Evermore
4. Stairway To Heaven
5. Misty Mountain Hop
6. Four Sticks
7. Going To California
8. When The Levee Breaks


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. Black Dog (Basic Track with Guitar Overdubs)
2. Rock And Roll (Alternate Mix)
3. The Battle Of Evermore (Mandolin/Guitar Mix From Headley Grange)
4. Stairway To Heaven (Alternate Mix)
5. Misty Mountain Hop (Alternate Mix)
6. Four Sticks (Alternate Mix)
7. Going To California (Mandolin/Guitar Mix)
8. When The Levee Breaks (Alternate U.K. Mix)
Quick Fact

The picture of the man in white on top of a mountain with a lantern was drawn in pencil and gold paint by Barrington Colby (allegedly a Jimmy Page pseudonym) and is titled View in Half or Varying Light.

The Hermit character from a Tarot card, a symbol of self-reliance and wisdom, was originally illustrated by Pamela Colman Smith.

The Hermit

"The image of the hermit that we used for the artwork of Led Zeppelin IV and in the movie actually has its origins in a painting of Christ called "The Light of the World" by the pre-Raphaelite artist William Holman Hunt. The imagery was later transferred to the Waite tarot deck [the most popular tarot deck in use in the English-speaking world]. My segment was supposed to be the aspirant going to the beacon of truth, which is represented by the hermit and his journey toward it." -Jimmy Page
Guitar World
December 2007

Led Zeppelin III More Info

LED ZEPPELIN III
Atlantic SD 7201 (U.S.) / 2401 002 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Pedal Steel Guitar, Backing Vocals
Robert Plant: Vocals and Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Tympani, Backing Vocals
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Backing Vocals

Viram Jasani:
Tabla Drums on Friends


1. Immigrant Song 2:26 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.
2. Friends 3:55 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.
3. Celebration Day 3:29 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.
4. Since I've Been Loving You 7:25 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.
5. Out On The Tiles 4:04 (Page/Plant/Bonham)
Recorded in June 1970 at Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
6. Gallows Pole 4:58 (Traditional, arr. by Page/Plant)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.
Mixed in August 1970 at Electric Lady, New York, with Eddie Kramer.
7. Tangerine 3:12 (Page)
Recorded in July 1970 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
8. That's The Way 5:38 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in July 1970 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
9. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp 4:20 (Page/Plant/Jones)
Recorded in May 1970 at Headley Grange, Hampshire. Engineered by Andy Johns.
10. Hats Off To (Roy) Harper 3:41 (Traditional, arr. by Charles Obscure)
Recorded in July 1970 at Island Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.

Length: 43:04

Mixed in August 1970 at Ardent Studios, Memphis
Engineered by: Terry Manning

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Gatefold Sleeve Designer: Richard Drew
Visual Creations: Zacron

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. The Immigrant Song (Alternate mix) 2:25 (Page/Plant)
2. Friends (Track, no vocal) 3:43 (Page/Plant)
3. Celebration Day (Alternate mix) 3:18 (Page/Plant)
4. Since I've Been Loving You (Rough mix of first recording) 7:16 (Jones/Page/Plant)
5. Bathroom Sound ("Out on the Tiles") (Track, no vocal) 4:00 (Bonham/Page/Plant)
6. Gallows Pole (Rough mix) 5:17 (Traditional, arr. Page/Plant)
7. That's The Way (Rough mix with dulcimer & backwards echo) 5:22 (Page/Plant)
8. Jennings Farm Blues ("Bron-Y-Aur Stomp") (Rough mix of all guitar overdubs that day) 5:54 (Jones/Page/Plant)
9. Keys to the Highway/Trouble in Mind (Rough mix) 4:05 (Big Bill Broonzy/Charlie Segar/Richard M Jones)

Length: 41:29

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

Credit must be given to BRON-Y-AUR a small derelict cottage in South Snowdonia for painting a somewhat forgotten picture of true completness which acted as an incentive to some of these musical statements - August, 1970.

Led Zeppelin III

Led Zeppelin III
[Click above for album images]

Easily one of 1970's most highly-anticipated albums, Led Zeppelin III shocked the world with acoustic songs like Friends, Gallows Pole, That's The Way and Bron-Y-Aur Stomp.

"The element of change has been the thing, really. We put out the first one, then the second... then a third LP totally different from them. It's the reason we were able to keep it together," said Jimmy Page.

For those die hard fans, songs like Immigrant Song, Celebration Day and Out On The Tiles were a familiar sound. Since I've Been Loving You, a blues tune in C minor that was recorded live in the studio, features excellent organ work by Jones and a killer solo by Jimmy Page.

This is definitely one of Led Zeppelin's most underrated albums. On the B-Side to Immigrant Song, another acoustic masterpiece, Hey Hey What Can I Do, was released as part of the first Boxed Set in 1990, twenty years after the single was released.

An advanced copy, Atlantic #ST-PR-A-157, of Gallows Pole was released to radio stations prior to release of Led Zeppelin III and clocked in with an additional 11 second outro from the final release.
Statistics

Released:
Oct. 5, 1970 (US)
Oct. 23, 1970 (UK)
Jun. 2, 2014 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Oct. 10, 1970
Multi Platinum: 6x May 3, 1999

Tracks

1. Immigrant Song
2. Friends
3. Celebration Day
4. Since I've Been Loving You
5. Out On The Tiles
6. Gallows Pole
7. Tangerine
8. That's The Way
9. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
10. Hats Off To (Roy) Harper


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. The Immigrant Song (Alternate Mix)
2. Friends (Track, No Vocal)
3. Celebration Day (Alternate Mix)
4. Since I've Been Loving You (Rough Mix of First Recording)
5. Bathroom Sound (Out On The Tiles) (Track, No Vocal)
6. Gallows Pole (Rough Mix)
7. That's The Way (Rough Mix with Dulcimer & Backwards Echo)
8. Jennings Farm Blues (Bron-Y-Aur Stomp) (Rough Mix of All Guitar Overdubs That Day)
9. Key To The Highway / Trouble in Mind (Rough Mix)
Quick Fact

The inner spinning wheel, conceptualized by Jimmy Page and realized by Zacron, was supposed to be based on crop rotation charts. "There are some silly bits--little chunks of corn and nonsense like that," Jimmy Page said in a 1996 interview.

Led Zeppelin II More Info

LED ZEPPELIN II
Atlantic SD 8236 (U.S.) / 588 198 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Backing Vocals
Robert Plant: Lead Vocals, Harmonica
John Bonham: Drums, Backing Vocals
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Backing Vocals

1. Whole Lotta Love 5:34 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in May 4-6, 1969 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles & June 1969, Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz.
2. What Is And What Should Never Be 4:44 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in June 1969 at Groove Studios, New York & June 1969, Olympic Studios, London. Engineered by George Chkiantz.
3. The Lemon Song 6:20 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in May 4-6, 1969 at Mirror Sound, Los Angeles & Aug. 5, 1969 at Mystic Studios, Los Angeles. Engineered Chris Huston.
4. Thank You 3:50 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in June 1969 at Morgan Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
5. Heartbreaker 4:15 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
Recorded in May 30-31, 1969 at A&R Studios, New York. Engineered by Eddie Kramer.
6. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) 2:40 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in June 25, 1969 at Morgan Studios, London. Engineered by Andy Johns.
7. Ramble On 4:35 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in June 1969 at Juggy Sound Studio, New York. Engineered by Eddie Kramer.
8. Moby Dick 4:25 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
Recorded in May 4-6, 1969 at Mirror Sound, Los Angeles & June 1969 at Mayfair Studios, New York. Engineered by Chris Huston.
9. Bring It On Home 4:19 (Page/Plant)
Recorded in Aug. 5, 1969, Mystic Studios, Los Angeles. Harmonica recorded May 10, 1969, Vancouver. Engineered by Eddie Kramer.

Length: 41:24

Mixed in August 29-30, 1969 at A&R Studios, New York
Engineered by: Eddie Kramer

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Artwork: David Juniper

1990 CD Mastering: Barry Diament
Remastering: George Marino

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC

1. Whole Lotta Love (Rough mix with vocal) 5:38 (Bonham/Dixon/Jones/Page/Plant)
2. What Is And What Should Never Be (Rough mix with vocals) 4:33 (Page/Plant)
3. Thank You (Backing track) 4:21 (Page/Plant)
4. Heartbreaker (Rough mix with vocal) 4:24 (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant)
5. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) (Backing Track) 3:08 (Page/Plant)
6. Ramble On (Rough mix with vocal) 4:43 (Page/Plant)
7. Moby Dick (Backing track) 1:37 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
8. La La (Intro/Outro rough mix) 4:07 (Jones/Page)

Length: 32:39

2014 remastered CD engineering: John Davis

Led Zeppelin II

Led Zeppelin II
[Click above for album images]

By the time Led Zeppelin II was released in the US on October 22, 1969, it already had a half million advanced orders. It was written and recorded on the road. In between shows, the band would find the nearest recording studio and lay some tracks down.

Led Zeppelin II was the first album to credit Robert Plant as a songwriter. What Is And What Should Never Be and Thank You showcase his tender songwriting abilities. Moby Dick was John Bonham's spotlight song and The Lemon Song or Killing Floor, as it was known in live performances, showed their blues roots, while hard-rockers Whole Lotta Love and Living Lovin' Maid (She's Just A Woman) made their way to US Radio.

Many critics call this the first heavy metal album, but that (as usual) undersells Zeppelin's eclecticism, and II really isn't any heavier than Led Zeppelin. However, it is another classic, though II is a little less consistent than the debut album.

Whole Lotta Love, along with Communication Breakdown from the first album, were also released on Atlantic Records' 1969 release Age Of Atlantic. [Front Pic] [Inside Pic] [Disc Front] [Disc Rear]
Statistics

Released:
Oct. 22, 1969 (US)
Oct. 31, 1969 (UK)
Jun. 2, 2014 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#1 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Nov. 10, 1969
Multi-Platinum: 12x Nov. 15, 1999
Diamond Award: Nov. 15, 1999

Tracks

1. Whole Lotta Love
2. What Is And What Should Never Be
3. The Lemon Song
4. Thank You
5. Heartbreaker
6. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman)
7. Ramble On
8. Moby Dick
9. Bring It On Home


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. Whole Lotta Love (Rough Mix with Vocal)
2. What Is And What Should Never Be (Rough Mix with Vocal)
3. Thank You (Backing Track)
4. Heartbreaker (Rough Mix with Vocal)
5. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) (Backing Track)
7. Moby Dick (Backing Track)
8. La La (Intro/Outro Rough Mix)
Quick Fact

The album cover has been dubbed "The Brown Bomber", due to the color and theme of the cover. The group of men on the front cover is a photograph of the Jasta Division of the German airforce with the band members faces inserted in place of those of the pilots.
Led Zeppelin II OriginsThe faces of band manager Peter Grant and Richard Cole were also added. The woman in the picture is Glynis Johns, the mother from "Mary Poppins". Her presence in the photo is an obvious play on the name of recording engineer Glyn Johns. The other face added was that of bluesman Blind Willie Johnson.

Led Zeppelin More Info

LED ZEPPELIN
Atlantic SD 8216 (U.S.) / 588 171 (U.K.)

Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Pedal Steel Guitar, Backing Vocals
Robert Plant: Vocals, Harmonica
John Paul Jones: Bass, Organ, Backing Vocals
John Bonham: Drums, Tympani, Backing Vocals

Viram Jasani: Tabla Drums on Black Mountain Side

1. Good Times Bad Times 2:46 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You 6:41 (Anne Bredon/Page/Plant)
3. You Shook Me 6:28 (Willie Dixon & J.B. Lenoir)
4. Dazed And Confused 6:26 (Jimmy Page)
5. Your Time Is Gonna Come 4:14 (Page/Jones)
6. Black Mountain Side 2:05 (Page)
7. Communication Breakdown 2:27 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
8. I Can't Quit You Baby 4:42 (Willie Dixon)
9. How Many More Times 8:28 (Page/Jones/Bonham)

Length: 44:26
Recorded and mixed in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London

Engineered by: Glyn Johns

Produced by Jimmy Page
Executive Producer: Peter Grant

Cover design: George Hardie
Back liner photo: Chris Dreja

1990 CD Mastering: Barry Diament
Remastering: George Marino

DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
1. Good Times Bad Times/Communication Breakdown 3:52 (Page/Jones/Bonham)
2. I Can't Quit You Baby 6:41 (Dixon)
3. Heartbreaker 3:50 (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham)
4. Dazed And Confused 15:01 (Page, inspired by Jake Holmes)
5. White Summer/Black Mountain Side 9:19 (Page)
6. You Shook Me 11:56 (Dixon/Lenoir)
7. Moby Dick 9:51 (Bonham/Jones/Page)
8. How Many More Times 10:43 (Page/Jones/Bonham)

Length: 1:11:12
Live Olympia, Paris, France, 10 October 1969

2014 Reissue Remastering: Jimmy Page

Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin
[Click above for album images]

This album, Led Zeppelin's 1969 debut begins with the crunching bare chords of Good Times, Bad Times. This heavy start to the album gives it the jump start it needs to belt out more rock classics further up the track listing and sets the tone for Zeppelin's brand of guitar-based rock. "Is that all there is to expect from this album?" I hear you say. Well, as soon as the second track Babe I'm Gonna Leave You begins Led Zep's dual-pronged acoustic/heavy rock approach is fully exposed to the listener.

The classic song from this album to most fans is Dazed and Confused, a Jimmy Page-written piece which starts with a brooding riff from John Paul Jones' bass then moves up a gear for the solo, in which Page takes his trademark violin bow to the guitar for the first time. On the excellent Black Mountain Side, Page gets the chance to show off his nimble acoustic finger picking on the acoustic guitar, whereas on songs like You Shook Me and Your Time Is Gonna Come John Paul Jones shines on the keyboards. How Many More Times is a lengthy, high energy exit to the first album. This spontaneous medley contains, excellent wah-wah action and a bow solo by Page.

Led Zeppelin is the band's rawest and most blues based recording. Page's guitar is on fire throughout, Bonham's drums thunder away in awe-inspiring fashion, Jones plays some terrific bass guitar and keyboards, and Plant's high-pitched vocal wail (with many a "baby baby" lyric) became the template for all future hard rock singers. Yet for all of their individual excellence, and they do all take spectacular solo turns here (particularly Page), it is the band's ensemble playing that remains most mind-blowing over 30 years later.

Communication Breakdown, along with Whole Lotta Love from the second album, were also released on Atlantic Records' 1969 release Age Of Atlantic. [Front Pic] [Inside Pic] [Disc Front] [Disc Rear]
Statistics

Released:
Jan. 12, 1969 (US)
Mar. 28, 1969 (UK)
Jun. 2, 2014 (Reissue)

Chart Position:
#2 (US) #1 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Jul. 22, 1969
Multi-Platinum: 10x Mar. 2, 2001
Diamond Award: Mar. 2, 2001

Tracks

1. Good Times Bad Times
2. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
3. You Shook Me
4. Dazed And Confused
5. Your Time Is Gonna Come
6. Black Mountain Side
7. Communication Breakdown
8. I Can't Quit You Baby
9. How Many More Times


DELUXE EDITION BONUS DISC
Live-L'Olympia Music Hall, Paris, France - 10 October 1969

1. Good Times Bad Times / Communication Breakdown
2. I Can't Quit You Baby
3. Heartbreaker
4. Dazed And Confused
5. White Summer / Black Mountain Side
6. You Shook Me
7. Moby Dick
8. How Many More Times
Quick Fact

This album was recorded in approximately 30 studio hours over a period of 9 days, with a reputed cost of £1,782. This, coming from an album that has sold over 10 million units to date, is a remarkable feat.
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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

March 17, 1969 - A four-song performance is filmed for TV Byen in Denmark (aired on May 19, 1969)
March 21, 1969 - Zeppelin’s debut TV appearance on "How It Is"
March 25, 1969 - Filming session for the Supershow
March xx, 1970 - The band turns down many TV offers worth large sums
March 05, 1971 - Led Zeppelin started a 12-date "Thank You" tour for British fans, appearing at the clubs from their early days and charging the same admission prices as in 1968. The first show was at Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland where they played songs from their upcoming fourth album, including the first public performances of Black Dog, Stairway To Heaven, Going To California and Rock And Roll.
March 12, 1972 - Page and Plant rehearse some songs with the Bombay Orchestra
March 25, 1973 - Led Zeppelin finally release Houses of the Holy after production issues with the album cover
March 28, 1973 - Led Zeppelin released Houses Of The Holy in the UK. The album title was a dedication by the band to their fans who appeared at venues they dubbed "houses of the holy". Houses Of The Holy has now been certified 11 times Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for US sales in excess of 11 million copies.
March xx, 1974 - The band decide to release a double album due to the amount of left over studio material
March 29, 1975 - Led Zeppelin saw all six of their albums in the US Top 100 chart in the same week, alongside their latest album Physical Graffiti at No.1. Physical Graffiti has now been certified 16 times Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for US sales in excess of 16 million copies.
March 15, 1975 - Tickets for the Earls Court shows sellout within four hours
March xx, 1976 - Jimmy speaks with reporters mentioning the new album due out called Presence
March 31, 1976 - Presence is released
March 28, 1977 - Zeppelin arrive in Dallas, Texas to rehearse before opening the eleventh tour of the US
March xx, 1978 - Robert and John spend some time hanging around the Midlands
March 26, 1979 - Robert takes lead vocal at a Bad Company gig in Birmingham
March 04, 1980 - John Bonham makes a TV appearance on "Alright Now" with Bill Connolly
March 26, 2006 - Readers of Total Guitar magazine voted the guitar solo by Jimmy Page in Led Zeppelin’s Stairway To Heaven as the greatest guitar solo of all time. The 1971 track was voted ahead of tracks by Van Halen, Queen, Jimi Hendrix and The Eagles. On the 20th anniversary of the original release of the song, it was announced via US radio sources that the song had logged up an estimated 2,874,000 radio plays - back to back, that would run for 44 years solid.
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