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Jimmy Page WINS planning battle with Robbie Williams after proposals are withdrawn



Rock legend Jimmy Page appears to have won his planning battle with Robbie Williams after the pop star sensationally withdrew all proposals to develop his mansion.

Williams, 41, bought the late Michael Winner's home in Holland Park in 2013 for £17.5 million.

He submitted two sets of plans for the property, known as Woodland House, which included relatively minor improvements along with a massive subterranean extension.

But the plans went down like a Led Zeppelin with his next door neighbour, Jimmy Page, who has lived in Grade I listed Tower House since 1972.

Page kicked off a planning row by writing a strongly worded objection letter about the proposals.

It escalated last month when Page hired two architectural experts to back his opinion that Tower House is so historically important it should be protected from any nearby development.


Jimmy Page's home

Another neighbour objected while one critic of the plans sent an objection letter to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea - from MELBOURNE.

On Thursday, the architects behind the planned project, Harper Downie, withdrew the plans. The firm today declined to comment.

It represents a big kick in the teeth for Williams, who bought 46-room Woodland House in 2013 for £17.5 million.

The property is one of the borough's best known homes thanks, in part, to its late former owner, the film director and food critic Michael Winner.


Jimmy Page pictured at the BRIT Awards

Williams first wanted to carry out a number of interior alterations to turn the Victorian mansion into a contemporary family pad.

He then submitted fresh plans for a two-storey, underground extension, measuring around 3,600sq/ft.

This is almost four times the size of the average new build in England and Wales and would have made up 11 per cent of the total accommodation.

In a letter to Kensington and Chelsea Council, submitted last month, Page expressed serious concern about how work could cause damage to the "irreplaceable interior" of his home.


Robbie's pad is on the right

He said: "Similar schemes have been carried out on other properties in the area locally and each time the level of vibration cause during the works has caused concern about the effect on decorative finished in The Tower House.

"The work now proposed to Woodland House is much nearer than other major excavations carried out so far and the consequences for the building fabric and decorative finished of The Tower House may well be catastrophic if this project is allowed to proceed."

Page's concerns were supported by a report carried out by historical building consultants Andrew Townsend Architects.

Mr Townsend, who has been practising as an architect for nearly 30 years, described The Tower House as "one of the most important houses built in this country in the nineteenth century".


Backing down: Robbie Williams

He said there would be "serious and very real concern" that major vibrations will be transferred to the building fabric of The Tower House during the proposed works.

This would create "the potential for damage to the fabric of the house and especially to the decorative finishes in the rooms on the east side of the house", he added.

The view has been supported by surveyors from civil engineering firm Clive Hudson Associates.

It is not the first time Williams, who is married to Ayda Field, has had a high profile property setback.

In 2009, the former Take That star paid £8.1 million for Compton Bassett House, which is regarded as one of Wiltshire's grandest privately owned properties.

However, four-years later it was back on the market and failed to sell despite a £5.5 million price-tag.

A spokesperson for Williams declined to comment.

From: The Mirror

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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

March 17, 1969 - A four-song performance is filmed for TV Byen in Denmark (aired on May 19, 1969)
March 21, 1969 - Zeppelin’s debut TV appearance on "How It Is"
March 25, 1969 - Filming session for the Supershow
March xx, 1970 - The band turns down many TV offers worth large sums
March 05, 1971 - Led Zeppelin started a 12-date "Thank You" tour for British fans, appearing at the clubs from their early days and charging the same admission prices as in 1968. The first show was at Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland where they played songs from their upcoming fourth album, including the first public performances of Black Dog, Stairway To Heaven, Going To California and Rock And Roll.
March 12, 1972 - Page and Plant rehearse some songs with the Bombay Orchestra
March 25, 1973 - Led Zeppelin finally release Houses of the Holy after production issues with the album cover
March 28, 1973 - Led Zeppelin released Houses Of The Holy in the UK. The album title was a dedication by the band to their fans who appeared at venues they dubbed "houses of the holy". Houses Of The Holy has now been certified 11 times Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for US sales in excess of 11 million copies.
March xx, 1974 - The band decide to release a double album due to the amount of left over studio material
March 29, 1975 - Led Zeppelin saw all six of their albums in the US Top 100 chart in the same week, alongside their latest album Physical Graffiti at No.1. Physical Graffiti has now been certified 16 times Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for US sales in excess of 16 million copies.
March 15, 1975 - Tickets for the Earls Court shows sellout within four hours
March xx, 1976 - Jimmy speaks with reporters mentioning the new album due out called Presence
March 31, 1976 - Presence is released
March 28, 1977 - Zeppelin arrive in Dallas, Texas to rehearse before opening the eleventh tour of the US
March xx, 1978 - Robert and John spend some time hanging around the Midlands
March 26, 1979 - Robert takes lead vocal at a Bad Company gig in Birmingham
March 04, 1980 - John Bonham makes a TV appearance on "Alright Now" with Bill Connolly
March 26, 2006 - Readers of Total Guitar magazine voted the guitar solo by Jimmy Page in Led Zeppelin’s Stairway To Heaven as the greatest guitar solo of all time. The 1971 track was voted ahead of tracks by Van Halen, Queen, Jimi Hendrix and The Eagles. On the 20th anniversary of the original release of the song, it was announced via US radio sources that the song had logged up an estimated 2,874,000 radio plays - back to back, that would run for 44 years solid.
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